Daha Rajput

In this post, I wll look at the Daha Rajput tribe, now found mainly in Khanewal District of Punjab. The Daha were rulers of an independent principality in the Neeli Bar and are an extremely influential tribe in Khanewal District. I would ask the reader to look at my post on the Kathiato give more information on the Bar nomad tribes.

The Daha are a branch of the Panwar Rajputs (also pronounced as Parmar), who ancestor was Mahrajah Shri Khand, ruler of the state of Dharanagri in Malwa region of Central India. The ancient Paramar kings of Dharanagri claimed to be members of the Agnikula or Agnivansha (“fire clan”). The Agnikula myth of origin, which appears in several of their inscriptions and literary works, goes like this: The sage Vishvamitra forcibly took a wish-granting cow from another sage Vashistha on the Arbuda mountain (Mount Abu). Vashistha then conjured a hero from a sacrificial fire pit (agni-kunda), who defeated Vashistha’s enemies and brought back the cow. Vashistha then gave the hero the title Paramara (“enemy killer”). The earliest known source to mention this story is the Nava-sahasanka-charita of Padmagupta Parimala, who was a court-poet of the Paramara king Sindhuraja (ca. 997-1010). The Parmar ruled an important state in Malwa until their decline in the 13th Century.

Coming back now to the the Daha, 20th in descent of Shrikhand was an individual by the name of Dohaj. Dohaj was a prince of Dharanagri, and it was his son Daha, from which the Daha Rajputs get their name. Twentieth in descent from Daha, was an individual who converted to Islam and took the name Taqi Khan. A descentdant of Taqi Khan by name of Singhaar Khan left Malwa and settled in the Neeli Bar, near where Khanewal is located. This migration is set to have occurred in the 13th Century. The Daha were pastoralist at this point, although they built a fort near present day Khanewal. Both the Delhi Sultanate and Mughal Empire maintained a very light control over the Bar nomads.

According to another tribal tradition, Daha, who was said to be a Muslim holy man, was married the daughter of Parihar Rajput, who were said to be the rulers of Multan. They claim kinship with the Bohar and Parhar Jats, who are also of Parihar Rajput ancestry. While another tribal tradition claims the tribe originated in Dharwar in central India, from where they migrated to Pakpattan. The tribe then spread to Khanewal and Multan. There original name was dharawal, or in English people of the town of Dharwar, which was shortened to Daha. During the period which saw the break up of the Mughal Empire (circa 18th Century), the Daha became effective rulers of the portion of the Neeli Bar that forms the modern Khanewal District. The town of Khanewal is name after Khan Daha, the founder.

With the collapse of Mughal authority in the 18th Century, the Daha chief Hasan Khan carved out an independent principality. The principality included Tulamba, Luddan and Tibbi Sultanpur. However, like many of these petty Muslim Rajput principalities, the Daha also saw the arrival of the Sikhs. During the rule of Ziarat Khan, the Daha chiefs acknowledged Sikh overlordship (around 1790). The Daha chiefs were granted lands in Bahawalpur such as Khairpur Tamiwali, to which they paid tribute to the Daudputra rulers of that state. When the region came under British rule in 1849, the Daha chief was Khan Mohammad Khan, who was made a zamindar by the new authorities. Like other Bar chiefs, Khan Mohammad lost his indipendence. When Khanewal was founded by the British, and the area opened up to canal colonization, the Daha were granted extensive estates by the colonial authorities. The current member of national assembly from Khanewal is Muhammad Khan Daha .

In terms of distribution, they are found mainly in Vehari, Khanewal, D G Khan, D I Khan,Faisalabad, Multan and Rajanpur districts. Important Daha villages starting with Khanewal District include Dera Nishat Khan Daha, Rajanpur District Kotla Esan and Kotla Daha, and in Muzaffargarh District, their main villages are Head Bakaini, Mahiwal Daha, Sardar Mohammed Daha, Mohammed Daha, Chak Ali Daha and Ali Daha. 

Noon / Nun Rajput

In this post, I will look at the Noon, sometimes spelt Nun, tribe of Rajputs. Two of their branches, those of Shujabad near Multan and Hamooka near Khushab achieved political power, although Noons are  also found in Bhakkar, Jhang and Faisalabad.  The Noons of Khushab are closely connected with  the Tiwana, and I would ask the reader to look at my post on that tribe.

Origin Myth
The Noon are a tribe of Jat and Rajput status, found in mainly in Shujabad Tehsil of Multan District. According to one of their traditions, they are descended Noon, a Bhatti Rajput, who said to have left Delhi. According to other traditions, Kalyar was a son of Rana Raj Wadhan, who had four other sons, (1) Utterā, (2) Nun, (3) Kanjun, (4) Hatar. The tradition is that the ancestors of Raj Wadhan lived in ancient times near Ghajni (which is said to have existed near Rawalpindi), from where they migrated to Delhi, which after a time they left for Bhatner (now known as Hanumangarh). In the 7th century of the Hijra Raj Wadhan together with his tribe left Bhatner and settled near Chhanb Kulyar (now in the Lodhran District), which in those days lay on the southern bank of the Sutlej and formed part of the dominions of Rai Bhutta, the ruler of a city, the greater part of which was destroyed by the Sutlej flowing over it; but parts of its ruins are still to be seen on the right bank of the Ghāra (in Lodhran District). Rana, Raj Wadhan had a beautiful daughter whom Rai Bhutta, desired to marry. The request was refused by Kalyar, the eldest son of Raj Wadhan ; and the result was that a sanguinary battle took place in which Rai Bhutta, was slain. The tract of the country thus conquered by the Kalyars became known as Chhanb Kalyar, which name it still retains. At this time Sher Shah Sayyid Jalal was living in Uch, where Rana Raj Wadhan and his sons went to see him and embraced Islam. Raj Wadhan remained at Uch, Uttera, occupied the  Viah  (Bias), Nun, also known as Nano began to live on the banks of the Ravi, (and that tribe is now dominant in Shujabad tahsil), Kanjun at the Donari Mari, and Kalyar made Chhanb Kulyar his residence. Hatar was deprived of his share of the inheritance. Although, as my post on the Hattars show, they are now a substantial tribe in Sargodha District. Rajah Nanoo had sevens sons. One was said to have settled in Mitha Tiwana, another at Kahror Pacca in Lodhran District, one was settled in Shikarpur in Sindh and four were settled in Shujabad in Multan after accepting Islam on the hands of Makhdoom Jalaluddin Jahanian Jahangasht of Uch. All Noons except of those Sargodha write Rana as their title, except those of Mitha Tiwana, who use the title Malik.

Noon of Shujabad

There is however another tradition among the Noon of Shujabad, who claims descent from a Rajah Ganj, a Chandravanshi Rajput. The Rajah was prince of Thana Bhawan, which is a town in Uttar Pradesh, located  near the city of Delhi. A descendent of Rajah by the name of Nano converted to Islam at the hands of Makhdum Jahanian (b 1308- d 1384). The tribe, according to this tradition, gets its name Noon from Nano, and after their conversion to Islam they settled near Multan. They remained a pastoralist tribe living near the banks of the Chenab until the rule of the Mughal Emperor Akbar (r. 1556 to 1605). He granted the title of rana, which is a historical title meaning lord, and used by Rajput groups in South Asia, to their chiefs. The various Noon of Shujabad claim descent from six brothers, Ranjha, Janah, Ali Sher, Langa, Umar and Walan. These six brothers are said to have fled from near Multan, and founded the town of Bangala. From this original settlement, they founded further villages such as Basirpur, Mohanpur, Kachotha, Sat Burji and Jalalabad. A number of further settlements were established during the rule of the  governor of Multan, Nawab Muzaffar Khan. Two of the most important villages were those of Basti Mithu, Mari Noon and Dadu, while their other villages include Garwezpur, Basti Dad and Panoi. During the later Mughal period (18th Century), the Noon of Shujabad were independent, their most important chief being Rana Mithu. Rana Mithu’s son, Rana Gamah acknowledge Sikh sovereignity, and was an important courtier in Ranjit Singh’s court. When Sikh rule ended in 1848, his nephew, Rana Ahmed Yar Khan  was appointed zaildar. The Noon’s of Shujabad are still active in politics, with Rana Ijaz Ahmad Noon , serving as a Member of the Punjab Assembly.

In addition to the Shujabad Noons, another branch of the family is settled in Kahror Pacca in Lodhran District.

Noon of Kahror Pakka

Another branch of the Noon are found in the town of Kahror Pakka, in Lodhran District. According to some traditions, the Noon are a branch of the Kanju tribe. Rana Alhaj Rabnawaz Noon, a Kahror Pakka who authored the Tareekh Noon Rajput (Moeenabad, 1986), wrote the following about the Kehror Pakka branch:

 

The Noon clan resides mostly in Sargodha district and Multan district of Punjab.The Noon clan migrated from Dehli and settled in the Bhalwal and the Shujabad areas. Great legater of Noon cast was Rana Fateh Mohammad who with his family came from District Shahpur (Sargodha) and settled in Mouzas Sangu and Chori Noon Tehsil Shorkot District Jhang. After settlement of a half century here, they populated in Khanqah Shah Hussain near Shatabgarh in Tehsil Mailsi. During this settlement Rana Fateh Mohammad came with his family to Noqabilwah of Kahror Pacca which was known as chak Bangar Shirqi and permanently settled here

According to the Kehror Pakka. they arrived in the region from Sargodha and Jhang almost 250 years ago. Alhaj Rabnawaz writes further:

In Sikhs regime, a senior member of Joiya family constructed a rivulet from Qabilwah to Mari Bhagowah. That part of rivulet which was constructed in the area of Bhago Khan was known as Mari Bhagowah and remaining part of rivulet which was constructed in Bangar Shirqi was given the name of Noqabilwah. That is why the old name was converted into new name Noqabilwah and majority of Noon family of Kahror Pacca is resided in Noqabilwah.

The Noon’s were subject to the Pathan Nawabs of Multan, but were semi-independent, until Multan fell to the armies of Maharaja Ranjit Singh in 1817. The Noon then sack to the position of zamindars under Sikh and then from 1848, British rule/

Noon of Khushab / Sargodha

This branch of the Noon tribe also traces its descent from Rajah Ganj. Rajah Nano here did not settle in Shujabad, but arrived with his kinsmen in the Thal.  Here they established close relationship with their neighbours, the Tiwanas, with whom they have long inter-married. While the arrival of the Sikh reduced the power of the Shujabad Noons, the Sikh power strengthened the Khushab Noons. Their chiefs, Malik Bakhsh Khan and his son Malik Jahan Khan served in the army of Maharaja Ranjit Singh, and held some villages in jagir, which were then lost in the last period of Sikh rule. Malik Fateh Khan, the Noon chief at time of the annexation of Punjab by the British in 1848, helped the British put down a Sikh uprising in 1849. The Malik was giving an estate by the British as a reward. From this branch of the Noon family came the Pakistani prime minister Feroze Khan Noon.

The Noon established fifteen villages in Sargodha District in the late 19th Century, after a grant of the large jagir. The most important of which are Alipur Noon, Nurpur Noon, Sardarpur Noon and Sultanpur Noon.

Distribution of Noon Rajputs According to the 1901 Census of India

District / State
Population
Multan 3,653
Shahpur 1,213
Total Population 4,866

Population of Noon Jats According to the 1901 Census

District / State
Population
Chenab Colony 172
Other Districts 205
Total Population 377

Khichi Chauhans of Punjab

In this post, I will look at the clan of the Khichi Chauhans, a tribe that was centred and still found in the Neeli Bar region. The Neeli Bar is a geographical region in Punjab, Pakistan. It consists of the uplands between the rivers Ravi and Satluj. “Bar” is the name given to areas in Punjab which were thick forests before the arrival of the modern canal irrigation system. Its soil is very fertile, as this plain is formed by the mud that has been collected by rivers flowing from the Himalayas. This region consists of the districts Sahiwal, Okara and Pakpattan . In my post on the Kathia, I give a bit more on the conditions and history of the tribal communities found in this region of Punjab. The Khichi family of Mailsi, are often referred to as the classic feudals of Punjab, having dominated local politics of Mailsi for the last seventy years since independence from the British. The current Member of the Punjab Assembly is for Mailsi is Muhammad Jahanzeb Khan Khichi. However, most present day Khichi are largely farmers.

Khichi, sometimes spelt Khichee, are a branch of the Chauhan clan of Agnivanshi Rajputs (please look at posting on Tribes of Potohar for a definition of Rajput). I shall start off by giving some brief information on the Chauhans. The Chauhan kingdom became the leading Rajput state in Northern India under Prithviraj III (1165–1192), also known as Prithviraj Chauhan or Rai Pithora . The Chauhan state collapsed after Prithviraj was defeated by Mohammed of Ghor in 1192 at the Second Battle of Tarain, but the Chauhans remained in Ajmer as feudatories of Mohammed of Ghor and the Sultans of Delhi until 1365, when Ajmer was captured by the rulers of Mewar, finally ending Chauhan rule. This also led to the dispersal of the Chauhans, with some migrating towards Punjab. The Chauhan kingdom collapsed after Prithviraj was defeated by Mohammed of Ghor in 1192 at the Second Battle of Tarain, but the Chauhans remained in Ajmer as feudatories of Mohammed of Ghor and the Sultans of Delhi until 1365, when Ajmer was captured by the rulers of Mewar. According to Khichi tribal traditions, the descend from Manak Rai, a semi-mythical Chauhan ruler of Ajmer. Manik Rai was said to be the brother of Dula Rai, the Chauhan king of Ajmer. In 684 CE, he fled from Ajmer after Dula Rai was killed by their enemies, and regained control managed of the area around Sambhar Lake with the blessings of the goddess Shakambh. The Khichi claim descent from Ajai Rao, the second son of Manik Rai, the legendry seventh century ruler of Sambhar in Rajasthan.

While the main Chauhan state was extinguished by 1365, cadet branches such as the Khichi, split up, some groups nmoving to the central Indian region of Malwa such as Asalgarh in Nimar. After being driven from Asalgarh, the Malwa Khichi founded the principality of Khilchipur, which lasted till the end of British rule in India and formed part of the Bhopal Agency under the administration of the Central India Agency. Another branch moved to Gagraun, in central Rajasthan, where they became tributaries of the Jhala Rajputs. The Khichi of Chota Udaipur state claim descent from this branch of the Khichis.

The Khichi of Punjab have slightly different origin story. According to their traditions, they claim descent from a Khichi ruler of Ajmer. Driven out of Delhi by one of the Sultan of Delhi, his descendants Sisan and Vidar migrated to Multan. The Khichis then fought with the Joiyas, then paramount in the region, expelling them from the Sutlej valley near the where the town of Mailsi is located. At sometime following their settlement in the Neeli Bar, the tribe converted to Islam. According to tribal traditions, they founded the villages of Shitab Garh, Sargana, Sheer Garh, Haleem Khichi, Aliwah, Tarki, Omar Khichi, Dhoda, and Fadda. One of their tradition refers to their conversion at the hands of the Sufi Bahaudin Zakaria of Multan. They then established a state based in the town of Mailsi, which finally conquered by the Sikhs in the 18th Century. Another branch established a state near the town of Gugera. Mailsi however remains the centre of the tribe. In addition to Punjab, branches of the Khichi tribe are still found in Rajasthan, especially in Jaisalmer, in India, who have remained Hindu, and have very similar origin stories as the Khichi of Punjab.

Groups of Khichi began migrating northwards, and the largest concentration of the Khichi are found in the Bhera Bar, a portion of the Kirana Bar located near the town of Bhera in Sargodha District. Khichi villages include Khichi Jagir, and Daulutpur Khichi in the Sahiwal Tehsil of Sargodha District, Khichi in the Talagang Tehsil and Khichi in Chakwal Tehsil of Chakwal District, and Khichi in Pind Dadan Khan Tehsil of Jhelum District. According to the 1901 Census of India, the Khichi were distributed in the following districts.

Khichi Rajput Population According to the 1901 Census of India

District Population
Chenab Colony 1,870
Multan 1,563
Montgomery 1,342
Bahawalpur 921
Shahpur 838
Jhang 733
Firuzpur 717
Mianwali 514
Other Districts 1,632
Total Population 10,130

Most of the Khichi population is still concentrated in the regions where they were found in 1901. The Khichi of Multan District were found near the town of Mailsi, which is now in Vehari, while the bulk of the Mianwali Khichi were found in the Bhakkar Tehsil, which is now a separate district.
Major Khichi Villages By District

Bhakkar District

1) Basti Cheena,

2) Chah Khichi

3) Khichi Kalan,

4) Khichi Khurd

5) Jhok Khichi

6) Wadhay Wali

Layyah District

1) Chak 459 TDA

2) Chak 465 TDA

Chiniot District

Chani Khichi

Faisalabad District

Chak106JB Khichian,

Shakeel Ahmed Khichi,

Chak 275 Mudooana

Hafizabad District.

Dera Mian Ali Khichi

Khanewal District

Khichiwala

Mandi Bahauddin District

1) Chakori

2) Sanda

Sargodha District

Chak No. 132 NB (Silanwali Tehsil),

Chak No. 139 SB (Silanwali Tehsil)

Okara District

Dholi Khichi,

Jawaya Khich

Nota Khichi

Sialkot District

Rahimpur Khichian

Khichi of Mailsi Region

But the greatest number of Khichi villages are still found in Mailsi region of Vehari District and include Sargana, Aliwah, Fadah, Halim Khichi, Umar Khichi, Shergarh, Shatabgarh, Tarki, Kilanj, Dhamakki, Dhodan and Jiwan Khichi. The Khichi have dominated the local politics in Vehari District, providing many of the members of the National Assembly.

Mahra, Naich and Waiha tribes of South Punjab

In this post I shall look at three tribes, namely the Mahra, Naich and Waiha or Vehas, that are found mainly in South Punjab. I would recemend the reader to look at the Multan Gazetteers, which has more information on the tribes. They all have traditions of migration from Rajasthan, leaving the desert of the Thar and settling in the valley of the Indus or Sutlej. The Jats and Rajputs of this region are said to have came from Rajputana and Jaisalmer and converted to Islam in the reign of Feroz Shah Tughlak (ruler 1351 to 1388). According to tribal traditions, as the Bhati rulers of Jaiselmer extended their control, they extinguished the independence of the various Jat of the what was then known as the Jangal Desh. As the tribes moved west towards the valley of the Sutlej, they encountered a Sufi saint who converted them to Islam. One of the Sufi often referred to in the conversion story was Jalaluddin Surkh-Posh Bukhari (1199–1291), which conflicts with the migration story under Tughlak. In Punjab, a claim of conversion at the hands of Sufi often adds prestige, therefore it is possible the migration occured latter under Tughlak, but the Sufi story was added later. One more point I wish to make that in Southern Punjab, the word Jat refers to any tribe that does not claim to be Saiyads, Baloch, Pathan and Qureshis and is somehow connected with agriculture. Therefore, according this definition, all these tribes are Jat.

Mahra

I start off by looking at the Mahra. According to tribal traditions, the Mahra were descended from a group of Chaghtai Mughals who were orignally settled in Delhi. However misfortune struck these group of Chaghtais, and in a feud, the entire tribe was slain, save a young boy. As he was found lying among the corpses, he was named Mars or Mehra, literally the dead one in Sindhi. He and his descendants migrated to the banks of the Indus. Here they contracted marriages with locally settled Jat tribes, and became Jat. However, despite this claim of Mughal origin, its worth mentioning that there are still several communities of Hindu Mahra Jats in Nagaur district such as Silanwad suggesting that the Mahra like the Naich and Waiha are also immigrants from the Jangal Desh.

They are still found along the banks of the Indus in Rajanpur District on the west bank and also in larger numbers in Alipur tehsil of Muzaffargarh District.Their main villages include Kot Mahra in Multan District, Bahadur Mahra, Mahra Faraz and Mahra Sharqi in Muzaffargarh District, Hazrat Wala in Rajanpur District, and Shaidani Sharif in Rahim Yar Khan District. A small number of Mahra are also found in northern Sindh.

Naich

The next tribe I will look at are the Naich, eastern neighbours of the Mahra. They are found largely in the valley of the Sultlej. The Naich claim to be Suryavanshi Rajputs, descended from Rajah Karan of the Mahabharata. Ninth in descent from Karan was a prince called Wadhol, Raja of Nainwal, who is said to have five sons – Langah, Naich, Shajra, Dahir and Bhutta. Naich is said to have a married a Jat, and his descendents became Jat. It is interesting to note the the other four names are all well known Jat tribes of South Punjab. According to their tribal traditions, they were converted to Islam by Jalaluddin Surkh-Posh Bukhari, the famous saint of Uch Sharif at the same time as their hereditary foes the Bohar. However, despite both groups converting to Islam, their feud continued. The region around Uch Sharif became extremely dangerous as a result of this feud. The Sayyid had enough and arranged that they should intermarry. The Bohars obeyed, but when it came to their turn to give a daughter to the Bohar they not only refused to do so but killed their Bohar son-in-law. As a result of the feud, the Bohar moved to the Cholistan, and the Naich became effective rulers of the territory which is now known as Rahim Yar Khan, until the arrival of the Daudpotras in the 18th Century.

Their clans are :

Dandra.
Nawal.
Tarapa.
Ladhrini
Malhni.
Murani
Budhani
Hajani

Villages

Bahawalpur District

Ahmad Naich

Amin Naich

Basti Fazal Ilahi Naich

Basti Muhammad Naich

Channi Goth

Hamad Naich

Jhok Naich

Kotla Naichan

Mauza Laalo Naich

Mauza Mahand Naich

Naichan Wala

Tahir Wali

Qadra Naich

Rahim Yar Khan District

Allahabad

Ali Haider Naich

Azizpur

Basti Atta Muhammad Naich

Basti Gul Muhammad Naich

Basti Huzoor Bakhsh Naich

Basti Imam Bakhsh Naich

Basti Laala Naich

Basti Malik Ahmad Bakhsh Naich

Basti Malik Bakht Ali Naich

Basti Malik Ghulam Rasool Naich

Basti Muhammad Panah Naich

Basti Muhammad Hussain Naich

Basti Noor Ahmad Naich

Basti Wasaya Naich

Chak No. 15/A

Changni Chowk

Dandli Naich

Dub Naich

Hazary Wala

Janpur Naichan

Kachi Muhammad Khan

Kanjaki Wala

Khan Bela

Naich Wala

Naich

Noorpur

Pakka Laran

Pakka Naich

Patti Naich

Unra Shareef

Wahi Wala

Muzaffargarh_District

Basti Islamabad

Basti Naich

Bhambhoo Sandeela

Jalasar Wala

Khakwani Wala

Khathar Wala

Sabu Wala

Khanewal District

Arry Wala

Basti Allah Yar Naich

Bohar Wala

Chak No. 8/9R Qasba

Dhory Wala

Dilawar Wala

Dinga Naich

Goh Wala

Jallah Naich

Vehari District

Bair Wala

Chah Baqar Khan Naich

Chah Kor Wala

Chak No. 65/KB

Chak No. 200 EB/33

Dingi Pul

Gehli Chak No. 37/WB

Ghara Mor

Karampur Qasba

Kassi Wala

Mauza Khahi Peer

Mauza Mustafa Abad

Bhakkar District

Basti Naich

Bhamban Wala

Dera Naich

Mohallah Naichan Wala Kallar Kot

Mohallah Naichan Wala Kohawar Kalan

Mohallah Naichan Wala Kotla Jam

Layyah District

Jhok Naich

Naich Nagar

Naich Wala

Toba Tek_Singh_District

Baggi Saidpur

Basti Faram

Chak No. 690/32 GB

Rajanpur District

Basti Malik Amanullah Naich

Naich Wala

Lodhran District

Chah Naichan Wala

Dhanot

Jangal Naich

Dera Ghazi Khan District

Chah Qutab Wala

Naich Wala

Multan District

Basti Naich

Naich

Wahi Naich

Other Villages

Chak No. 19 NB (Punjab, Sargodha), Chak No. 99/12L (Chichawatni, Sahiwal), Goth Fateh Muhammad Naich (Pind Dadan Khan, Jehlum), Kassowal (Chichawatni, Sahiwal), Katana (Punjab, Noor Pur Thal, Khushab), Chak No. 52 AMB (Sargodha), Manda Khel (Isa Khel, Mianwali), Naich Naich (Pind Dadan Khan, Jehlum) and Nizamabad Naich (Thathi Muzamil, Shahpur, Sargodha).

Waiha / Veha

The last tribe I will look at this in this post are the Waiha or sometimes written as Veha.

They trace their origin to Jaisalmer and according to tribal traditions that in the 4th century of the Hijra (913 CE – 1009 CE) the Raja of that State gave Rurar, the modern Tajgarh, in dower to his daughter Huran, and that the place was named after her. This region is now part of the arid region of Cholistan, a region that was part of the Bhati state of Jaisalmer until the arrival of the Daudpotras from Sindh in the 18th Century. At the close of the 10th CE, the Sufi saint Sayyid Ahmad Billauri settled in the this part of Cholistan in a place now called Amingarh close to Rurar which is now found in the modern Rahim Yar Khan District. The Sayyid began to preach Islam among the tribes of this desert region. This region was then ruled by Raja Bhunak Bhati who became a convert to Islam. Therefore, by ancestry the Waiha are Bhati Rajputs.

There are a number of traditions as to why these the Raja and his family acquired the name Waiha. One of the tradition point to a change in their name on conversion, for one derives Veha from vih, the Seraiki word for twenty, as it was that leading members of the tribe having been converted with Raja Bhunak. Another derives the name from wahi cultivation, because the Raja of Jaisalmer, Bhunak’s overlord as well as kinsman, confiscated their lands on their conversion, and the Sayyid told them to take to cultivation. A third fanciful etymology derives Veha from wah, because their conversion was applauded by the Sayyid’s followers. The Waiha were largely pastoralist, but most of their homeland now has a network of canals, and they are now settled farmers.

Most Waiha villages are located near the town of Allahabad, in Liaqatpur Tehsil of Rahim Yar Khan District. Two other clusters are found in Tulamba near Multan and in Dera Ismail Khan District in the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa.

Population of Jat clans of Faisalabad, Multan and South Punjab according 1901 Census of India

The British province of Punjab comprised five administrative divisions — Delhi, Jullunder, Lahore, Multan and Rawalpindi — and a number of princely states. This post gives a breakdown of the Jat clans enumerated as part of the 1901 Census of India. In 1901, the Multan Division comprised the following districts:

 

Multan District

The total Muslim Jat population in 1901 was 137,718, out of a total of 140,315, therefore almost all of Jat were Muslim.

Tribe Total
Athangal  308
Atwal  386
Aulakh  205
Autrah  2,979
Bachh  175
Bains 2,097
Bajwa  266
Bhangu  134
Bhullar  141
Bhutta  4,872
Buttar  141
Chaj  123
Chadhar 3,734
Channar 1,696
Cheema  311
Chhajra  168
Daha  472
Dhillon  82
Dhudhi  254
Gaun  349
Ghallu 2,761
Gill  536
Hanjra  190
Heer 370
Jakhar  1,822
Kachela 1,010
Kalyar  1,123
Kalru  1,362
Kanju 626
Khaira 467
Khaki  1,465
Lak  303
Lang  1,883
Langah  2,927
Langrial  3,171
Maan  122
Mahe  953
Mahota  271
Maitla  1,751
Naich  108
Nain  21
Nonari  617
Panuhan  268
Pandah 165
Phor 2,019
Raad  616
Rak  432
Rawn  1,813
Randhawa  113
Sahi  127
Sahota / Sahotra  379
Sahu  3,413
Sanda  286
Sandhel  2,118
Sandhu  606
Shajra  539
Sipra  749
Soomra  1,458
Tarar  140
Thaheem  4,540
Warraich  390
Wasir  1,586
Virk  1,571

Chenab Colony

The total Muslim Jat population in 1901 was 150,602 (65%)  out of a total of 230,529. Unlike the other parts of the erstwhile Multan Division, the Chenab Colony was a site a British Imperial colonization scheme, that brought large number of settlers from central Punjab. Among these settlers, the Jat were encouraged to come, and the Chenab Colony latter Lyalpur District had a large presence of Hindu and Sikh Jats. The Muslim Jat population included both long settled Jats such as the Bhutta, Khichi, Wagha and Wasir, and settlers from East Punjab such as the Bal, Dhariwal and Sandhu.

Tribe Total
Atwal  1,361
Aulakh  635
Bains  2,599
Bajwa  4,229
Bal  189
Balani  167
Bar  628
Bhangu  330
Bhatti 4,594
Bhullar 80
Bhutta 351
Buttar 247
Butta 563
Chahal 355
Chadhar 8,678
Chatha 692
Cheema 4,755
Chhina 1,054
Deo or Dev 492
Dhariwal 479
Dhillon 1,159
Gawanis 262
Ghumman 1,372
Gill 3,430
Gondal 768
Goraya 2,132
Hanjra 1,505
Harral 2,671
Heer 266
Jaj  382
Jakhar  248
Kahlon  594
Kahu  1,331
Kajla  364
Khake  120
Kang  308
Kathia  199
Khichi  120
Lak  609
Lali  207
Langah  214
Lidhar  132
Maan  190
Mahe  332
Mahil  97
Mangat  139
Naul  438
Noon  172
Pannu  352
Pawania  113
Rajoka  667
Randhawa  1,999
Sahi  699
Sahmal  778
Sandhu  2,467
Sarai  467
Sidhu  499
Sian  131
Sipra  3,385
Siroha  144
Sohal  67
Tatla  117
Tarar 1,154
Thaheem  158
Virk  1,683
Wagha  616
Wahla  756
Warraich  3,708
Wasir  1,112
Wattu  411

Jhang District

The total Muslim Jat population in 1901 was 50,596, out of a total of 50,769, therefore almost all of Jat were Muslim.

Tribe Total
Aura  437
Bains  257
Bar 271
Batth  145
Bhangu  179
Bhutta  477
Chadhar  6,345
Dab  805
Gil 539
Gilotar 1,393
Hanjra 370
Harral 3,491
Hasnana  104
Hidan  426
Jappa  706
Kalasan  252
Kasra  204
Kathia  119
Kudhan  216
Lak  394
Lali  1,932
Langah  112
Mahe  97
Maitla  238
Mangon  204
Matmal  149
Murali  526
Naul  616
Noon  181
Sahmal  641
Sipra  1,945
Suddle  221
Tarar  158
Targar  150
Thaheem  469
Virk  234
Wagha  200
Waiha  314

Muzzafargarh District

In 1901 the entire Jat population of was Muslim and numbered 117,362.

Tribe Total
Aulakh  122
Autrah  843
Babbar  2,363
Bhullar  116
Bhutta  2,803
Chadhar 525
Chan  479
Chatha  544
Daha 1,454
Dhal 368
Dhotar  138
Dona  205
Ghallu 1,327
Hanjra  402
Hans 395
Heer 395
Jakhar  104
Janjua 778
Jatal  144
Kalasra  1,281
Kalru  1,488
Kang 629
Khaira 2,085
Khaki  1,822
Lakaul  1,518
Langah  700
Lar  778
Mallana  1,797
Naul  118
Nonari  1,454
Panuhan  455
Parhar  2,610
Sahota / Sahotra  630
Sahu  870
Sandhel  2,477
Sipra  123
Soomra  611
Thaheem  1,748

Dera Ghazi Khan District

The total Muslim Jat population in 1901 was 118,701, out of a total of 118,843, therefore almost all of the Jat were Muslim.

 

Tribe Total
Atra  493
Babbar  4,294
Bains /Waince
123
Barra  1,597
Batwani  895
Bhatti  700
Bhutta  1,835
Buttar  1,292
Chachar  1,156
Chadhar 181
Channar 263
Chhajra  913
Chhina  545
Dahya  436
Dhandla  643
Dumra  778
Hanbi 871
Heer 372
Jakhar  273
Janjua 3,861
Jehlan 1,584
Jhar 402
Kahlon  416
Kajla 558
Kalru  106
Kanera  765
Kang 978
Khaira 200
Khati  612
Kohawer  467
Lakaul  1,157
Lak  547
Langah  1,967
Mahar  773
Mahesar  648
Maitla  776
Mallana  1,358
Mohana  3,591
Panwar  189
Parhar  579
Phor  719
Sahota / Sahotra  994
Sandhel 916
Sangi  1,244
Sial  231
Soomra  2,508
Thaheem  1,234
Virk  548
Wagha  456

Bahawalpur State

The total Muslim Jat population in 1901 was 175,370, out of a total of 192,146, therefore almost all of Jat were Muslim.

Tribe Total
Atwal  351
Bains / Waince
177
Bhaya  923
Bhutt  475
Bhullar  43
Buttar 447
Bipar  508
Bohar  3,833
Burara  498
Chachar  8,923
Chadhar 334
Chaudhary 1,162
Chhlar 7,529
Chhina  159
Dahar / Dahiri  1,307
Daha  148
Dahya  1,508
Dala  1,364
Dakah  823
Dasa 459
Dhandu  643
Duran 977
Gabora 352
Ganja  1,047
Hamshira – Chauhan 233
Jaam  448
Jhak  246
Jhullan 1,285
Kahka 1,453
Kalhora 745
Kalwar 1,584
Khaki  514
Khalne  412
Kheri  219
Khal  512
Khombra  637
Kohadar  493
Kolar  661
Kont  288
Langah  2,474
Lodhra  446
Makwal  473
Malak  3,264
Manela  628
Markhand  155
Marral  880
Masson 563
Mohal  373
Naich  3,786
Nanwai 1,833
Nehon  184
Parhar  7,960
Panwar /Puar  7,702
Samma  3,084
Sangah  123
Sangi  1,094
Sanda  139
Shajra  259
Sipra  611
Soomra  4,393
Sutera  468
Thaheem  1,653
Tonwar / Tomar  1,038
Unnar  327
Uttera  1,817
Waraich 287

Population of Muslim Jat Clans of British Punjab According to the 1901 Census of India

Bellow is a breakdown of the larger Jat clans by population. I would also the reader to look at my posts Population of Muslim Jat Clans of British Punjab According to the 1891 Census of India/ and Major Muslim Jat clans, which gives a brief description of the main clans.

 

Tribe Population Distribution
Wariach 58,936 Gurdaspur, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Jhelum, Sialkot, Lahore and Amritsar
Cheema 39,358 Patiala, Lahore, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Gujranwala, Sialkot, Gujrat and Chenab Colony
Bajwa 27,609 Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Jallandhar and Patiala State
Chandhar/ Chadhar 27,422 Montgomery, Amritsar, Firuzpur, Lahore, Jhang, Muzaffargarh, Mianwali, Multan, Jhelum, Shahpur and Chenab Colony
Sandhu 25,786 Hissar, Ludhiana, Patiala, Montgomery, Gurdaspur, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Amritsar, Shahpur (Sargodha), Chenab Colony, Jhang and Multan
Tarar 25,606 Lahore, Gujrat, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Sargodha, Jhelum and Chenab Colony
Gill 19,894 Amritsar, Ludhiana, Jalandhar, Firuzpur, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Sialkot, and Chenab Colony
Virk 19,703 Gujranwala, Chenab Colony, Gujrat, Dera Ghazi Khan, Sialkot, Lahore and Amritsar
Ghumman 16,893 Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Sialkot, and Chenab Colony
Hanjra 15,892 Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Montgomery, Shahpur, Gujrat, Sialkot, and Chenab Colony
Bains 14,398 Ambala, Hoshiarpur, Gurdaspur, Sialkot, Gujrat, Jhelum, Rawalpindi, Shahpur, Chenab Colony, Multan and Dera Ghazi Khan
Bhutta 14,208 Shahpur, Jhelum, Mianwali, Multan and Chenab Colony
Goraya 14,076 Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Sialkot, and Chenab Colony
Bhatti 13,682 Shahpur, Jhelum, Mianwali and Chenab Colony
Langrial 12,960 Sialkot, Gujrat and Multan
Dhillon 12.913 Ambala, Hissar, Jalandhar, Kapurthala, Ludhiana, Amritsar, Lahore, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Sialkot Mianwali, and Chenab Colony
Sipra 12,558 Patiala, Montgomery, Gurdaspur, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Shahpur (Sargodha), Chenab Colony, Jhang, Multan and Bahawalpur
Heer 11,839 Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Montgomery, Shahpur, Mianwali, Gujrat, Sialkot, and Chenab Colony
Soomra / Samra 11,509 Mianwali, Muzaffargarh, Dera Ghazi Khan, Bahawalpur
Chatha 11,483 Patiala, Lahore, Gurdaspur, Gujranwala, Sialkot, Gujrat and Chenab Colony
Sahi 11,478 Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Patiala, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Gujrat, Jhelum and Sialkot
Sidhu 11,322 Hissar, Jallandhar, Ludhiana, Patiala, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Sialkot, Lahore, Gujranwala, Gujrat and Chenab Colony
Parhar 11,099 Shahpur, Bahawalpur, Muzaffargarh and Dera Ghazi Khan
Thaheem 11,023 Multan, Bahawalpur, Muzaffargarh and Dera Ghazi Khan
Kahlon 10,809 Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Kapurthala, Jalandhar and Chenab Colony
Langah 10,808 Shahpur, Muzaffargarh, Dera Ghazi Khan, Mianwali, Multan and Bahawalpur
Harral 10,599 Gujranwala, Shahpur, Mianwali, Gujrat, Jhang, and Chenab Colony
Chachar 10,079 Bahawalpur and Dera Ghazi Khan
Randhawa 9,617 Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Patiala, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Gujranwala and Sialkot
Chhina 8,492 Lahore, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Gujranwala, Sialkot, Gujrat, Rawalpindi, Mianwali, Chenab Colony and Dera Ghazi Khan
Panwar or Puar 7,900 Bahawalpur and Firuzpur
Chelar 7,529 Bahawalpur
Babbar 6,657 Multan, Dera Ghazi Khan and Muzaffargarh
Kang 6,580 Patiala, Lahore, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Gujranwala, Sialkot, Gujrat, Multan, Muzaffargarh and Chenab Colony
Sandhel 6,215 Dera Ghazi Khan, Mianwali, Muzaffargarh, Bahawalpur
Maan 5,939 Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Patiala, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Gujranwala, Sialkot and Chenab Colony
Aulakh 5,838 Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Amritsar, and Jallandhar
Sarai 5,746 Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Amritsar, Ludhiana, Ambala and Jallandhar
Janjua 5,394 Mianwali, Muzaffargarh and Dera Ghazi Khan
Jodhra 5,157 Attock
Mangat 5000 Patiala, Ludhiana, Gujrat, Gujranwala and Sialkot
Autrah 4,962 Multan, Mianwali and Muzaffargarh
Ghallu 4.906 Multan, Muzaffargarh and Bahawalpur
Buttar 4,923 Dera Ghazi Khan, Ludhiana, Firuzpur, Lahore, Gurdaspur, Gujranwala and Sialkot
Dhariwal 4,884 Ambala, Hissar, Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Amritsar, Lahore, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Sialkot and Chenab Colony
Chahal 4,466 Ambala, Ludhiana, Firuzpur, Amritsar, Lahore, Gurdaspur, Gujranwala, Sialkot and Chenab Colony
Sahu 4,294 Multan and Muzaffargarh
Dosanjh 4,198 Kapurthala and Jalandhar
Sial 4,169 Rawalpindi and Mianwali
Jakhar 4,165 Hissar, Firuzpur, Bahawalpur, Mianwali, Montgomery, and Multan
Lak 3,971 Shahpur, Jhang, Chenab Colony, Muzaffargarh and Dera Ghazi Khan
Bhullar 3,905 Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Jalandhar and Lahore
Naij 3,894 Bahawalpur
Bohar 3,833 Bahawalpur and Dera Ghazi Khan
Khaki 3,801 Multan, Muzaffargarh and Bahawalpur
Khokhar 3,735 Gujranwala
Malana 3,609 Muzaffargarh and Dera Ghazi Khan
Dahya 3,602 Ambala, Bahawalpur, Hissar, Karnal, Rohtak and Delhi
Mohana 3,591 Dera Ghazi Khan
Deo / Dev 3,549 Ludhiana, Patiala, Amritsar, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Mianwali and Chenab Colony
Lodike 3,269 Gujranwala
Malak 3,264 Bahawalpur
Atwal 3,200 Jalandhar and Amritsar
Lali 3,137 Shahpur and Jhang
Samma 3,084 Bahawalpur
Kharal 3,046 Gujranwala
Kalru 2,956 Multan and Muzaffargarh
Kanyal 2,944 Rawalpindi and Jhelum
Khera or Khaira 2,942 Lahore, Amritsar and Sialkot
Sahotra 2,805 Hoshiarpur, Jalandhar and Chenab Colony
Maitla 2,765 Dera Ghazi Khan and Multan
Phor 2,738 Multan and Dera Ghazi Khan
Lakaul 2,675 Muzaffargarh and Dera Ghazi Khan
Dhotar 2,545 Gujranwala and Gujrat
Gondal 2,508 Jhelum, Rawalpindi and Chenab Colony
Bassi 2,449 Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Sohal 2,383 Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Patiala, Amritsar, Gurdaspur and Sialkot
Sangi 2,338 Dera Ghazi Khan, Bahawalpur, Firuzpur and Kapurthala
Naul 2,311 Jhang
Aura 2,329 Rawalpindi
Kalasra 2,284 Mianwali and Muzaffargarh
Bahiniwal / Wahiniwal 2,227 Montgomery, Hissar, Rohtak and Firuzpur
Daha 2,222 Muzaffargarh, Multan and Bahawalpur
Dhamial 2,209 Rawalpindi and Jhelum
Johal 2,199 Amritsar, Kapurthala, Jalandhar and Chenab Colony
Nonari 2,086 Multan, Muzaffargarh, Montgomery and Bahawalpur
Channar 1,959 Multan and Bahawalpur
Lang 1,873 Multan
Mahil 1,861 Ambala, Hoshiarpur and Amritsar
Nanwai 1,833 Bahawalpur
Uttera 1,817 Multan and Bahawalpur
Kalial 1,791 Rawalpindi
Sudhan 1,765 Rawalpindi
Pannun 1,752 Amritsar, Lahore, Gujranwala, Sialkot and Chenab Colony
Chhajra 1,648 Dera Ghazi Khan
Barra 1,597 Dera Ghazi Khan
Bhachar 1,588 Mianwali
Jakhlan 1,584 Dera Ghazi Khan
Kalwar 1,582 Bahawalpur
Khatreel 1,578 Rawalpindi
Rehan 1,573 Jhang and Shahpur
Hans 1,542 Multan, Muzaffargarh and Montgomery
Waseer 1,513 Chenab Colony
Jhammat 1,508 Mianwali and Jhelum
Turk 1,499 Mianwali
Kohawer 1,487 Mianwali
Kahka 1,453 Bahawalpur
Gandhi 1,452 Mianwali
Bal 1,439 Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Lahore, Jalandhar and Ludhiana
Marral or Marhal 1,434 Karnal, Patiala and Jhang
Sahmal 1,417 Jhang and Chenab Colony
Tulla 1,403 Sargodha
Asar 1,400 Mianwali
Sanda 1,398 Bahawalpur and Mianwali
Gilotar 1,394 Jhang
Dumra 1,357 Mianwali and Dera Ghazi Khan
Turkhel 1,344 Mianwali
Sekhon 1,335 Gujranwala
Kahu 1,331 Chenab Colony
Dahar / Dahiri 1,327 Bahawalpur
Kalu 1,301 Mianwali
Kalu 1,301 Mianwali
Jhullan 1,285 Bahawalpur
Lohanch 1,275 Mianwali and Muzaffargarh
Wagha 1,273 Chenab Colony
Rawn 1,213 Multan
Bhidwal 1,207 Mianwali
Hanbi 1,207 Dera Ghazi Khan
Bhangu 1,186 Amritsar, Gurdaspur and Chenab Colony
Khandoa 1,168 Mianwali
Chaudhari 1,162 Bahawalpur
Ser 1,144 Mianwali
Uttra 1,145 Mianwali
Kalyar 1,123 Multan
Rawn 1,212 Multan
Talokar 1,096 Mianwali
Jhawari 1,092 Shahpur
Mahe 1,050 Multan
Ganja 1,047 Bahawalpur
Tonwar / Tomar 1,038 Bahawalpur
Dhindsa 1,032 Jalandhar, Kapurthala, Ludhiana, Amritsar, Lahore, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Sialkot, and Chenab Colony
Kachela 1,010 Multan
Samtia 1,007 Mianwali
Joiya 993 Bahawalpur, Firuzpur and Mianwali
Duran 977 Bahawalpur
Panjootha 966 Shahpur
Grewal 965 Ludhiana
Dhudhi 965 Mianwali
Dhandla 929 Dera Ghazi Khan
Bhaya 923 Bahawalpur
Kajla 922 Dera Ghazi Khan
Hidan 915 Jhang
Dab 908 Jhang
Bar 899 Chenab Colony
Minhas 824 Jhelum
Dakah 823 Bahawalpur
Gorchhar 807 Mianwali
Shajra 796 Multan and Bahawlpur
Bhumla 793 Mianwali
Lar 778 Multan and Muzaffargarh
Mahaar 773 Dera Ghazi Khan and Bahawalpur
Kanera 765 Dera Ghazi Khan
Wahla 756 Chenab Colony
Kalhora 725 Bahawalpur
Panuhan 723 Multan
Jora 718 Shahpur
Jappa 706 Jhang
Jatal 703 Rawalpindi
Kolar 661 Bahawalpur
Burana 657 Shahpur
Khichi 651 Bahawalpur
Mahesar 648 Dera Ghazi Khan and Bahawalpur
Baghial 647 Rawalpindi
Dhandhu 643 Bahawalpur
Khombra 637 Bahawalpur
Dhamtal 635 Rawalpindi
Manela 628 Bahawalpur
Kanju 626 Multan
Raad 618 Multan
Khatti 612 Dera Ghazi Khan
Butta 610 Chenab Colony
Rajoke 607 Chenab Colony
Mial or Miyal 599 Rawalpindi
Maghial 596 Rawalpindi
Bhakral 585 Jhelum
Pawania 581 Karnal, Hissar and Firuzpur
Lodhra 580 Multan
Pawania 576 Hissar, Karnal and Rohtak
Bedha 572 Mianwali
Masson 563 Bahawalpur
Nissowana 560 Shahpur and Jhang
Ghatwala or Malik 556 Hissar, Karnal, Rohtak and Delhi
Marath 549 Shahpur
Sanghera 544 Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Basra 540 Gurdaspur and Sialkot
Thathaal 534 Rawalpindi, Jhelum and Sialkot
Murali 526 Jhang
Khal 512 Bahawalpur
Bipar 508 Bahawalpur
Dharal 499 Mianwali
Burara 498 Bahawalpur
Kohadar 496 Bahawalpur
Badhan 494 Rawalpindi, Jhelum and Sialkot
Magrial 486 Rawalpindi
Chan 479 Muzaffargarh
Bhutt 475 Bahawalpur
Makwal 473 Dera Ghazi Khan and Bahawalpur
Sutera 468 Bahawalpur
Sehwag 462 Karnal and Rohtak
Dasa 459 Bahawalpur
Nain 456 Karnal, Rohtak and Delhi
Jaam 448 Bahawalpur
Sagoo 445 Shahpur (Sargodha)
Rak 435 Multan
Khalne 412 Bahawalpur
Wattu 411 Chenab Colony
Sandi 410 Mianwali
Jhar 402 Dera Ghazi Khan
Deshwal / Deswal 400 Hissar, Gurgaon, Karnal, Rohtak and Delhi
Khar 389 Muzaffargarh
Jaj 382 Chenab Colony
Noon 377 Multan
Dhal 374 Shahpur
Mohal 373 Montgomery and Bahawalpur
Budhwana 366 Mianwali
Rathi 363 Karnal, Rohtak and Delhi
Chauhan 361 Lahore and Amritsar
Gahora 352 Bahawalpur
Gaun 349 Multan
Manais 332 Montgomery
Sahgra 331 Multan
Unnar 329 Bahawalpur
Toor 329 Patiala State
Gangal 325 Rawalpindi
Kathia 320 Montgomery
Matyal 314 Rawalpindi
Athangal 308 Multan
Sarah 300 Firuzpur,
Dona 290 Multan
Kont 288 Bahawalpur
Siroha 281 Rohtak
Mahota 277 Multan
Bucha 275 Multan
Bhagiara 270 Rawalpindi
Gawanis 262 Chenab Colony
Wawana 258 Mianwali
Kalasan 252 Jhang
Jhak 246 Bahawalpur
Hurgan 236 Shahpur
Chauhan-Hamshira 233 Bahawalpur
Tama 231 Jhelum
Hundal 230 Amritsar and Chenab Colony
Mangral 226 Rawalpindi
Hattial 222 Rawalpindi
Suddle 221 Multan
Khehi 219 Bahawalpur
Kudhan 216 Jhang
Kassar 216 Jhelum
Rawana 215 Mianwali
Salhal 215 Rawalpindi
Mangon 204 Jhang
Kasra 204 Jhang
Bhindar 194 Gujranwala
Harrial 194 Rawalpindi
Nehon 184 Bahawalpur
Atar Khel 181 Mianwali
Waghora 173 Mianwali
Godara 170 Karnal, Rohtak and Delhi
Phira 170 Rawalpindi
Pala Khel 169 Mianwali
Balani 167 Chenab Colony
Pandah 165 Multan
Des 158 Mianwali
Markhand 155 Bahawalpur
Hannial 155 Rawalpindi
Mundra 150 Rawalpindi
Targar 150 Jhang
Matmal 149 Jhang
Dagur 148 Gurgaon, Rohtak and Delhi
Kalu Khel 147 Mianwali
Lidhar 141 Amritsar and Chenab Colony
Gallat 138 Rohtak
Phal 135 Rawalpindi
Walana 132 Rawalpindi
Sian 131 Chenab Colony
Birkan 130 Mianwali
Chal 123 Multan
Sangah 123 Bahawalpur
Tatla 117 Chenab Colony
Sahrawat 108 Karnal, Rohtak and Gurgaon
Hasnana 104 Jhang
Khalis 102 Rawalpindi
Narwal 101 Karnal
Dalal 97 Hissar, Gurgaon, Rohtak and Delhi
Bandecha 90 Lahore
Chandhran 76 Multan
Kookara 55 Jhang
Ahlawat 48 Rohtak
Baidwan 47 Ambala
Rohal 44 Karnal and Rohtak
Dhankar 42 Delhi and Rohtak
Sheoran 37 Hissar and Karnal
Salakhlan 25 Rohtak
Gulia 17 Rohtak and Delhi
Sethi 14 Ludhiana
Boparai 13 Ludhiana
Aujla Malerkotla 11
Kadian 11 Karnal

 

Population of Muslim Jat Clans of British Punjab According to the 1911 Census of India

Below is a breakdown of the larger Jat clans by population according to the 1911 Census of Punjab. I would also the reader to look at my post Major Muslim Jat clans, which gives a brief description of the main clans, and their present distribution. I would also ask the reader to look at my post on the Muslim Rajput Clans of Punjab according to the 1911 Census.

Prior to 1947, Punjab consisted of the following territories:

Punjab (British India): British Territory and Princely States
Division Districts in British Territory / Princely States
Delhi Division
Jullundur Division
Lahore Division
Rawalpindi Division
Multan Division
Total area, British Territory 97,209 square miles
Native States
Total area, Native States 36,532 square miles
Total area, Punjab 133,741 square miles

Source Wikipedia

Punjab 1909.jpg

Map of British Punjab: Source Wikipedia

Tribe Population Distribution
Gondal
68,850 Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Kapurthala, Faridkot, Lahore, Amritsar, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Shahpur, Jhelum, Jhang, and Rawalpindi
Warriach 67,191 Patiala, Hoshiarpur, Jalandhar, Lahore, Amritsar, Sialkot, Gujrat, Gujranwala, Shahpur, Jhelum, Lyallpur, and Multan
Sidhu 62,665 Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Firozpur, Lahore, Amritsar, Faridkot, Patiala, Nabha, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Shahpur, Lyallpur, Montgomery, and Multan
Sandhu 54,649 Karnal, Kapurthala, Faridkot, Patiala, Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Firozpur, Lahore, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Sialkot, Gujrat, Gujranwala, Shahpur, and Rawalpindi
Bhatti 41,529 Amritsar, Lahore, Sialkot, Shahpur, Gujrat, Jhelum, Dera Ghazi Khan, Mianwali, Montgomery, Multan and Bahawalpur
Cheema 37,076 Nabha, Jullundur, Kapurthala, Faridkot, Firozpur, Gurdaspur, Sialkot, Lahore, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Shahpur, Jhelum, Rawalpindi, and Lyallpur
Khokhar 33,032 Hisar, Firozpur, Lahore, Amritsar, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Shahpur, Mianwali, Jhang, Lyallpur, Muzaffargarh, and  Bahawalpur
Virk 26,028 Nabha, Patiala, Jalandhar, Firozpur, Lahore, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Sialkot, Montgomery, Lyallpur and Multan
Gill 25,146 Nabha, Patiala, Hoshiarpur, Jalandhar, Kapurthala, Ludhiana, Firozpur, Faridkot, Gurdaspur, Amritsar, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Shahpur, Lyallpur, Montgomery, and Multan
Kharal 24,702 Hisar, Jalandhar, Faridkot, Firozpur, Gujranwala, Montgomery, Lyallpur, Multan and Bahawalpur
Bajwa 23,501 Jalandhar, Gurdaspur, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Shahpur and Lyallpur
Tarar 22,351 Hoshiarpur, Amritsar, Lahore, Gujranwala, Sialkot, Gujrat, Jhelum, Shahpur and Lyallpur
Sial 21,251 Hoshiarpur, Ludhiana, Gurdaspur, Faridkot, Firozpur, Lahore, Gujrat, Jhelum, Shahpur, Rawalpindi, Dera Ghazi Khan, Mianwali and Bahawalpur
Awan 21,098 Gurdaspur, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Shahpur, Muzaffargarh, Jhang, Multan and Dera Ghazi Khan
Chadhar/Chandher 19,396 Firozpur, Amritsar, Lahore, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Jhelum, Shahpur, Mianwali, Montgomery, Jhang, Lyallpur, Multan, and Bahawalpur
Chhina 19,135 Ludhiana, Kapurthala, Firozpur, Faridkot, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Gujranwala, Sialkot, Gujrat, Shahpur, Lyallpur, Jhang, Multan, Mianwali, Dera Ghazi Khan and Bahawalpur
Ranjha 18,411 Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Jhelum, Attock, and Shahpur
Bhutta 16,772 Faridkot, Firozpur, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Sialkot, Gujrat, Jhelum, Shahpur, Multan, Dera Ghazi Khan, Muzaffargarh, Mianwali, Multan and Bahawalpur
Parhar 15,392 Firozpur, Lahore, Amritsar, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Shahpur, Jhelum, Mianwali, Dera Ghazi Khan, Muzaffargah, Jhang, and Multan
Joiya 15,374 Hisar, Firozpur, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Jhelum, Shahpur, Mianwali, Jhang, Lyallpur and Dera Ghazi Khan
Ghumman 13,826 Patiala, Jalandhar, Amritsar, Lahore, Gurdaspur, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Shahpur, Lyallpur and Montgomery
Mahaar 12,945 Hisar, Patiala, Nabha, Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Firozpur, Gurdaspur, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Jhelum, Shahpur, Montgomery, Multan and Bahawalpur
Hanjra 12,844 Hisar, Patiala, Faridkot, Firozpur, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Shahpur, Jhelum, Jhang, Montgomery, Muzaffargarh and Multan
Thaheem 11,974 Firozpur, Kapurthala, Amritsar, Gujrat, Shahpur, Mianwali, Jhang Dera Ghazi Khan, Muzaffargarh and Bahawalpur
Kahlon 11,942 Firozpur, Faridkot, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Sialkot and Gujranwala
Chachar 11,783 Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Jhelum, Shahpur,Montgomery, Lyallpur, Jhang, Multan, Muzaffargarh and Bahawalpur
Dhillon 11,561 Hisar, Jind, Ambala, Nabha, Patiala, Hoshiarpur, Jalandhar, Kapurthala, Ludhiana, Firozpur, Faridkot, Gurdaspur, Amritsar, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Lyallpur, and Montgomery
Bains /Waince 11,487 Karnal, Ambala, Jind, Patiala, Hoshiarpur, Jalandhar, Kapurthala, Ludhiana, Firozpur, Faridkot, Gurdaspur, Amritsar, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Jhelum, Shahpur, Mianwali, Lyallpur, Muzaffargarh, and Montgomery
Jora 10,166 Hisar, Karnal, Firozpur, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Jhelum,  Shahpur, Mianwali, Muzaffargarh and Multan
Khichi 10,067 Hisar, Firozpur, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Jhelum, Shahpur, Mianwali Jhang, Montgomery, Lyallpur, Multan and Bahawalpur
Noon 9,984 Gujranwala, Jhelum, Shahpur, Jhang, Multan and Bahawalpur
Harral 9,553 Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Jhelum, Shahpur, Jhang, Lyallpur and Multan
Panwar or Puar 9,367 Jind, Patiala, Amritsar, Firozpur,  Lahore, Sialkot, Gujrat, Gujranwala, Jhang, Lyallpur, Montgomery, Muzaffargarh, Multan, Dera Ghazi Khan, and Bahawalpur
Randhawa 9,261 Hoshiarpur, Ludhiana, Jalandhar, Faridkot, Firozpur, Amritsar, Gurdaspur,  Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Lyallpur, and Multan
Lak 9,129 Gujrat, Jhelum, Shahpur, Mianwali, Dera Ghazi Khan, Jhang, Lyallpur, Multan and Bahawalpur
Goraya 8,707 Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Firozpur, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Shahpur and Lyallpur
Nonari 8,236 Firozpur, Montgomery, Jhang, Lyallpur, Muzaffargarh, Multan, Dera Ghazi Khan and Bahawalpur
Chauhan 8,213 Ambala, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Jhelum, Shahpur, Mianwali, Dera Ghazi Khan, Muzaffargarh and  Bahawalpur
Langah 8,170 Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Firozpur, Gurdaspur, Sialkot, Gujrat, Jhelum, Shahpur, Mianwali, Dera Ghazi Khan, Muzaffargarh, Multan and Bahawalpur
Aujla 8,153 Jalandhar, Kapurthala, Hoshiarpur, Gurdaspur, Sialkot and Lyallpur
Sahi 7,947 Hoshiarpur, Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Firozpur, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Jhelum, Shahpur, Mianwali, Lyallpur and Dera Ghazi Khan
Soomra 7,742 Shahpur, Dera Ghazi Khan, Muzaffargarh, Mianwali and Multan and Bahawalpur
Chande / Chand 7,694 Hisar, Patiala, Firozpur, Lahore and Sialkot
Thathaal 7,550 Gurdaspur, Gujrat, Sialkot, Jhelum, Shahpur and Rawalpindi
Malana 7,237 Ambala, Hoshiarpur, Jalandhar, Gurdaspur, Sialkot, Gujrat, Shahpur, Mianwali, Muzaffargarh, Dera Ghazi Khan and Multan
Dhudhi 7,193 Firozpur, Gujrat, Shahpur, Jhelum, Mianwali, Montgomery, Muzaffargarh, and Bahawalpur
Chahal 6,914 Hisar, Karnal, Jind, Ambala, Hoshiarpur, Kapurthala, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Gujranwala, Sialkot, Gujrat, Shahpur, Montgomery and Lyallpur
Bulla 6,691 Multan and Bahawalpur
Babbar 6,657 Dera Ghazi Khan, Muzaffargarh, Multan and Bahawalpur
Bandar / Wandar 6,465 Hisar, Patiala, Hoshiarpur, Jalandhar, Kapurthala, Firuzpur, Amritsar, Gujranwala, Sialkot, Gujrat, Jhelum, Mianwali, Montgomery, Multan and Muzaffargarh
Dhamial 6,232 Shahpur, Jhelum and Rawalpindi
Jhammat 6,206 Lahore, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Jhelum, Shahpur, Mianwali, Muzaffargarh, Lyallpur, Multan and Bahawalpur
Daha 6,041 Montgomery, Muzaffargarh, Multan and Bahawalpur
Heer 6,013 Patiala, Hoshiarpur, Jullundur, Kapurthala, Ludhiana, Firozpur, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Shahpur, Mianwali, Jhang and Dera Ghazi Khan
Chatha 5,963 Kapurthala, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Shahpur, Jhelum, Rawalpindi, Lyallpur and Multan
Sipra 5,886 Jalandhar, Gujrat, Gujranwala, Shahpur, Jhelum, Lyallpur, Jhang, Muzaffargarh,  and Multan
Mekan 5,435 Firozpur, Gujrat, Jhelum, Shahpur, Multan and Muzaffargarh
Targar 5,359 Gujranwala, Shahpur, Mianwali, Montgomery, Muzaffargarh, Multan and Bahawalpur
Ghallu 5,313 Gujrat, Shahpur, Mianwali, Muzaffargarh, Multan and Bahawalpur
Bohar 5,308 Gujranwala, Shahpur, Multan, Muzaffargarh, Dera Ghazi Khan and Bahawalpur
Maan 5,261 Patiala, Jind, Ambala, Hoshiarpur, Jullundur, Ludhiana, Firozpur, Lahore, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, and Lyallpur
Bab 5,257 Dera Ghazi Khan
Ghatwala also known as Malik 5,144 Hisar, Delhi, Karnal, Rohtak, Jind State, and Firozpur
Bassi 5,090 Ambala, Kapurthala, Jalandhar, Lahore and Lyallpur
Langrial 4,489 Sialkot, Gujrat, Shahpur,  Rawalpindi, Mianwali, Multan and Bahawalpur
Mahra 4,810 Lahore, Sialkot, Dera Ghazi Khan, Jhang, Multan and Bahawalpur
Bangial 4,798 Sialkot, Gujrat, Jhelum and Rawalpindi
Sandhila 4,566 Shahpur, Dera Ghazi Khan, Muzaffargarh, Mianwali and Multan
Maitla 4,497 Gurdaspur, Sialkot, Jhelum, Shahpur, Dera Ghazi Khan, Muzaffargarh, Multan, Montgomery and Bahawalpur
Lali 4,852 Hoshiarpur,Sialkot, Gujrat,  Shahpur, Jhelum, Jhang, and Montgomery
Aulakh 4,486 Nabha, Jalandhar, Gurdaspur, Amritsar, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Mianwali, Muzaffargarh, Montgomery and  Dera Ghazi Khan
Dhariwal 4,449 Jind, Patiala, Ambala, Ludhiana, Jalandhar, Kapurthala, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Lahore, Gujrat, Shahpur, Jhelum, Lyallpur and Montgomery
Basra 4,417 Hisar, Faridkot, Hoshiarpur, Jalandhar, Kapurthala, Gurdaspur, Amritsar, Sialkot, Gujranwala and Gujrat
Dahar or Dahiri 4,391 Ludhiana, Firozpur, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Montgomery, Dera Ghazi Khan and Bahawalpur
Naich 4,379 Mianwali, Jhang, Dera Ghazi Khan and Bahawalpur
Bhullar 4,358 Hisar, Jind, Nabha, Patiala, Ambala, Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Firozpur, Amritsar, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Shahpur, Mianwali, Multan, and Lyallpur
Manjotha 4,348 Muzaffargarh and Dera Ghazi Khan
Chaughata 4,201 Amritsar, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Shahpur, Mianwali, Multan and Bahawalpur
Jakhar 4,102 Hisar, Karnal, Jind, Firozpur, Sialkot, Gujrat, Shahpur, Multan, Montgomery, Mianwali,  Muzaffargarh, Dera Ghazi Khan and Multan
Malak 4,042 Bahawalpur
Lang 4,039 Firozpur, Shahpur, Montgomery, Multan, Muzaffargarh and Bahawalpur
Hans 4,019 Hisar, Nabha, Patiala, Ludhiana, Firozpur, Gujranwala, Shahpur,  Muzaffargarh, Montgomery, Multan and Bahawalpur
Khera or Khaira 3,958 Jullundur, Ludhiana, Firozpur, Faridkot, Lahore, Amritsar, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Jhelum, Lyallpur, Dera Ghazi Khan, Muzaffargarh and Bahawalpur
Kang 3,887 Ambala, Hoshiarpur, Jullundur, Ludhiana, Kapurthala, Firozpur, Faridkot, Amritsar, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Shahpur, and Lyallpur
Sahu 3,864 Shahpur, Montgomery, Lyallpur, Jhang, Dera Ghazi Khan and Bahawalpur
Atwal 3,850 Ambala, Jalandhar, Kapurthala, Firozpur, Lahore, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Lyallpur, Multan and Bahawalpur
Maij 3,786 Bahawalpur
Mangat 3,748 Ambala, Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Jhelum, Lyallpur and Montgomery
Sangi 3,697 Ambala, Patiala, Jalandhar, Firuzpur, Kapurthala, Multan, Dera Ghazi Khan and Muzaffargarh
Joota 3,664 Hisar, Firozpur, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Shahpur, Lyallpur, Jhang, Muzaffargarh and Multan
Gujar 3,653 Hisar, Firozpur, Shahpur, Montgomery, Lyallpur, Jhang, Multan and  Muzaffargarh
Batth 3,550 Hoshiarpur, Jalandhar, Lahore, Amritsar, Siakot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Jhelum and Lyallpur
Mahil 3,540 Hisar, Gurgaon, Jind, Ambala, Kalsia, Hoshiarpur, Jalandhar, Firozpur, Sialkot, Lahore, Montgomery and Lyallpur
Kanyal 3,872 Gujranwala, Gujrat, Jhelum, Shahpur and Mianwali
Nahra 3,484 Jind, Hisar, Jhelum, Shahpur, Mianwali, Jhang and Lyallpur
Punia 3,442 Hisar, Karnal, Ambala, Jind, Patiala, Malerkotla, Ludhiana, Lyallpur and Multan
Naul 3,372 Gujranwala, Montgomery, Lyallpur, Jhang and Multan
Kalyal 3,168 Shahpur, Jhelum and Rawalpindi
Khak 3,161 Sialkot, Gurdaspur, Multan, Muzaffargarh, Dera Ghazi Khan and Bahawalpur
Bilar 3,147 Multan
Buttar 3,067 Patiala, Faridkot, Firozpur, Amritsar, Ludhiana, Jalandhar, Kapurthala, Gurdaspur, Gujranwala, Sialkot, Lahore, Attock, Mianwali, and Dera Ghazi Khan
Lurka 3,038 Gujranwala, Lyallpur, Jhang and Multan
Sahotra 3,035 Ambala, Ludhiana, Jalandhar, Kapurthala, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Jhang, Dera Ghazi Khan and Muzaffargarh
Mangat 2,962 Patiala, Ambala, Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Firozpur, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Jhelum, Montgomery and Lyallpur
Sujal 2,954 Shahpur, Mianwali and Bahawalpur
Janjua 2,876 Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Mianwali, Muzaffargarh, Lyallpur and Muzaffargarh
Badhan 2,856 Karnal,  Ambala, Hoshiarpur, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujrat, Jhelum, Muzaffargarh and Multan
Rehan 2,847 Lahore, Gujrat, Shahpur, Jhelum, Jhang and Multan
Sarai 2,827 Jullundur, Ludhiana, Kapurthala, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Jhelum, Muzaffargarh and Dera Ghazi Khan
Minhas 2,825 Firozpur, Lahore, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Jhelum, Shahpur and Lyallpur
Jammun 2,784 Faridkot, Firozpur, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Mianwali, Multan, Muzaffargarh, Montgomery, and Bahawalpur
Lidhar 2,774 Hoshiarpur, Jullundur, Ludhiana, Firozpur, Faridkot, Kapurthala, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Multan and Lyallpur
Lakaul 2,675 Dera Ghazi Khan and Muzaffargarh
Lodike 2,675 Gujranwala
Aheer 2,647 Hoshiarpur, Jalandhar, Firozpur, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Shahpur, Mianwali, Multan and Lyallpur
Raan / Rawn 2,616 Firozpur, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Shahpur, Mianwali, Lyallpur, Muzaffargarh, Multan and Bahawalpur
Lodhra 2,571 Jalandhar, Sialkot, Gujrat, Shahpur, Mianwali, Multan, Muzafargarh and Bahawalpur
Kachela 2,517 Dera Ghazi Khan, Multan and Mianwali
Wehi 2,509 Multan
Arar 2,478 Shahpur, Jhelum, Montgomery, Mianwali and Jhang
Dosanjh 2,473 Ludhiana, Jalandhar, Firozpur and Kapurthala
Khakhi 2,418 Muzaffargarh, Multan and Bahawalpur
Wahla 2,416 Gurdaspur, Lahore, Gujranwala, Sialkot, Gujrat, and Lyallpur
Kallu 2,403 Hoshiarpur, Jalandhar, Kapurthala, Amritsar, Lahore, Mianwali, Jhang, and Muzaffargrh
Uttera 2,392 Shahpur, Mianwali, Multan and Bahawalpur
Jajularu 2,379 Multan
Asar 2,352 Shahpur, Mianwali, Muzaffargarh and Multan
Makwal 2,309 Muzaffargarh, Dera Ghazi Khan, and Bahawalpur
Talokar 2,307 Jhelum, Mianwali, Shahpur, and Jhang
Jangal 2,298 Jhelum, Shahpur, Jhang, and Muzaffargarh
Dhaku 2,295 Gujranwala, Shahpur, Montgomery, and Bahawalpur
Jhandir 2,294 Ambala, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Jhang, Muzaffargarh, and Montgomery
Kalasra 2,275 Firozpur, Muzaffargarh, and Mianwali
Lar 2,238 Karnal, Muzaffargarh, Dera Ghazi Khan, Multan, Montgomery, and Bahawalpur
Waseer 2,266 Firozpur, Lahore, Montgomery, Lyallpur, Dera Ghazi Khan and Multan
Auler Khel 2,244 Mianwali
Rajoke 2,243 Jhang, Lyallpur
Dhal 2,210 Lahore, Shahpur, Mianwali and Jhang
Arain 2,192 Multan
Uttra 2,162 Shahpur, Jhang and Muzaffargarh
Bhakral 2,147 Jhelum
Pannun 2,138 Hoshiarpur, Jalandhar, Amritsar, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Shahpur, Multan and Lyallpur
Chapal 2,120 Jalandhar and Bahawalpur
Marath 2,101 Gujrat, Shahpur, Jhelum, and Lyallpur
Lohan 2,085 Hisar, Karnal, Rohtak, Ludhiana, Sialkot, Gujrat and Lyallpur
Gadri 2,071 Patiala, Hoshiarpur, Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Sialkot and Gurdaspur
Gadra 2,071 Hisar, Rohtak, Jind State and Patiala State
Lona 2,062 Jhang and Lyallpur
Khatarmal 2,040 Gujrat and Jhelum
Sambar 2,030 Amritsar and Dera Ghazi Khan
Sohal 2,005 Hoshiarpur, Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Amritsar, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Shahpur, Muzaffargarh and Dera Ghazi Khan
Khatril 2,004 Rawalpindi
Ves 1,987 Amritsar, Shahpur, Jhelum, and Jhang
Baidwan 1,976 Hissar, Karnal, Ambala and Patiala
Deo 1,961 Jind, Ludhiana, Jalandhar, Kapurthala, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Gujranwala, Sialkot, and Gujrat
Nagyal 1,933 Jhelum, Rawalpindi, Gujrat and Lyallpur
Barra 1,927 Gurdaspur, Gujranwala, Muzaffargarh, Jhang and Dera Ghazi Khan
Aulara 1,915 Mianwali
Jandi 1,912 Patiala, Hoshiarpur, Jalandhar, Kapurthala, Gurdaspur, Sialkot, and Gujrat
Chattar 1,911 Hoshiarpur, Lahore, Gurdaspur, Sialkot, Gujrat, Shahpur and Jhelum
Shajra 1,972 Lahore, Shahpur, Jhelum, Mianwali, Multan and Dera Ghazi Khan
Khar 1,853 Mianwali, Muzaffargarh and Bahawalpur 
Nanwa 1,833 Bahawalpur
Bhasa 1,829 Multan
Bhangu 1,827 Patiala, Ludhiana, Jalandhar, Kapurthala, Gurdaspur, Amritsar, Gujranwala, Sialkot, Lahore, Gujrat and Jhang
Adohana 1,827 Multan and Muzaffargarh
Barar, Sidhu-Barar 1,815 Firozpur, Gurdaspur, Mianwali, and Dera Ghazi Khan
Raya 1,790 Jhelum
Raad 1,780 Gujrat, Muzaffargarh, Multan and Dera Ghazi Khan
Boparai 1,779 Jalandhar, Gurdaspur, Amritsar, Lahore, Sialkot and Gujranwala
Nain 1,770 Hisar, Patiala, Karnal, Delhi and Rohtak
Natt 1,731 Patiala, Gurdaspur, Kapurthala, Gujranwala, Sialkot, and Gujrat
Bhachar 1,719 Mianwali
Marral 1,705 Jhang, and Bahawalpur
Changar 1,704 Lyallpur and Dera Ghazi Khan
Dakhna 1,700 Dera Ghazi Khan, Multan, and Bahawalpur
Wattu 1,695 Gurdaspur, Firozpur, Lahore, Gujranwala, Shahpur, Jhang and Multan
Tonwar / Tomar 1,691 Bahawalpur
Kalsan 1,690 Jhang, Lyallpur and Montgomery
Gangal 1,681 Gujranwala, Gujrat, Shahpur, Jhelum, and Rawalpindi
Panwat 1,676 Bahawalpur
Kamboh 1,667 Mianwali, Dera Ghazi Khan and Bahawalpur
Nagra 1,657 Gurdaspur, Sialkot and Gujrat
Phogat 1,656 Patiala State, Jind State, Hisar, Rohtak and Karnal
Malhi 1,655 Ambala, Hoshiarpur, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Sialkot, and Gujranwala
Malil 1,633 Montgomery
Larsan 1,609 Multan
Padda 1,575 Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Sialkot, and Gujrat
Jajalani 1,571 Dera Ghazi Khan
Sandrana 1,553 Gujranwala, Shahpur, Gujrat and Multan
Bhamb 1,552 Shahpur and Mianwali
Kalair 1,530 Hoshiarpur, Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, and Jhelum,
Grewal 1,518 Ambala, Jalandhar and Ludhiana and Gujranwala
Chhajra 1,507 Mianwali and Dera Ghazi Khan
Gilotar 1,497 Gujranwala, Shahpur and Jhang
Kalru 1,488 Muzaffargarh
Mahun 1,471 Jhang
Thind 1,461 Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Firozpur, Muzaffargarh, Mianwali and Montgomery
Jaam 1,444 Gujranwala, Gujrat, Shahpur, Muzaffargarh, Multan, Montgomery, and Bahawalpur
Kanjial 1,433 Gujrat
Sandal 1,413 Multan, Jhang, Lyallpur, and Montgomery
Kianth 1,414 Ambala, Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Lyallpur, and Montgomery
Sandi 1,391 Shahpur, Multan, Muzaffargarh, and Mianwali
Dahya 1,391 Bahawalpur
Bole 1,349 Hisar, Karnal, Patiala Jalandhar, Kapurthala,  and Gurdaspur
Kundi 1,331 Mianwali
Angra 1,338 Shahpur, Mianwali, Jhang and Muzaffargarh
Bhakkar 1,327 Hisar, Ambala, Kapurthala, Shahpur and Jhelum
Wasli 1,327 Firozpur, Lyallpur and Multan
Tulla 1,311 Shahpur
Kalwar 1,271 Bahawalpur
Khoti 1,268 Jhelum, Gujrat and Shahpur
Bhidwal 1,295 Mianwali
Dawana 1,290 Multan
Jhullan 1,285 Bahawalpur
Bahiniwal 1,268 Jind, Hisar, Karnal and Rohtak
Parohe 1,253 Multan
Nourangi 1,247 Multan
Deval / Deol 1,226 Patiala, Hoshiarpur, Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Firozpur, Amritsar and Lahore
Sagoo 1,215 Shahpur, Gujrat, Mianwali and Multan
Chani 1,204 Dera Ghazi Khan and Bahawalpur
Sohi 1,198 Ludhiana, Jalandhar, Patiala and Gurdaspur
Bagwar 1,179 Multan
Ghagar 1,177 Multan
Mahla 1,160 Hisar, Firozpur, Sialkot, Gujranwala and Bahawalpur
Khinger 1,152 Hoshiarpur, Ludhiana and Jhelum
Matyal 1,147 Jhelum
Sansi 1,140 Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Gujranwala, Lahore and Lyallpur
Tatri 4,448 Gujrat, Shahpur and Jhang
Johal 1,115 Gurdaspur, Ludhiana, Jalandhar, Kapurthala, Firozpur and Lyallpur
Kanera 1,114 Dera Ghazi Khan, Mianwali, and Muzaffargarh
Mahi 1,099 Patiala, Gurdaspur, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Multan, Lyallpur and Jhang
Jhawari 1,092 Shahpur
Sadraj 1,091 Multan
Bar 1,084 Jhang and Lyallpur
Dhar 1,074 Bahawalpur
Bara 1,073 Gurdaspur, Sialkot, Gujranwala and Jhang
Samma 1,236 Firozpur, Multan and Bahawalpur
Kalia 1,059 Firozpur, Lahore, Amritsar, Montgomery and Bahawalpur
Aishiani 1,058 Dera Ghazi Khan
Khat 1,055 Shahpur
Gorchhi 1,054 Mianwali
Gauja 1,047 Bahawalpur
Kadhar / Kadher 1,045 Jhang
Kudhan 1,045 Jhang
Pansota 1,041 Hoshiarpur and Lyallpur
Dara 1,040 Multan
Uppal 1,037 Nabha, Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Amritsar, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Shahpur, and Lyallpur
Marhal also sometimes called Mandal 1,037 Patiala, Karnal and Lyallpur
Kalhora 1,031 Bahawalpur and Dera Ghazi Khan
Panghal 1,027 Hisar, Karnal, Gurgaon and Rohtak
Gujjral 1,020 Gujrat and Jhelum
Thabal 1,019 Jhang
Banas 1,017 Hisar, Delhi, Jalandhar and Firozpur
Sahmal 994 Jhang
Lakhiwal 994 Jind and Patiala
Chhaj 981 Muzaffargarh, Lyallpur, Multan and Dera Ghazi Khan
Duran 977 Bahawalpur
Chachakar 974 Multan
Sadhari 974 Multan
Bandhel 968 Patiala, Hoshiarpur, Jalandhar, Amritsar, and Gurdaspur
Shakhani 961 Dera Ghazi Khan
Chozan 958 Muzaffargarh and Bahawalpur
Maru 956 Jhang
Dhandla 949 Dera Ghazi Khan
Chimar 947 Bahawalpur
Samitah 943 Bahawalpur
Kamoka 943 Lyallpur and Jhang
Burana 935 Shahpur
Maho 934 Multan and Montgomery
Saand / Saund 933 Mianwali and Bahawalpur
Siana 933 Multan
Chanal 919 Multan
Hidan 914 Jhang
Katwal 912 Bahawalpur
Mandahar 909 Patiala, and Ludhiana
Dakha 908 Patiala, Rohtak, and Karnal
Suddle 896 Multan, and Bahawalpur
Batwani 895 Dera Ghazi Khan
Samdana 895 Dera Ghazi Khan
Kakrial 894 Bahawalpur
Pumma 893 Mianwali
Hatiar 881 Gujrat Sialkot, Shahpur and Jhelum
Samra 880 Ludhiana, Jalandhar, Kapurthala, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Sialkot, and Gujranwala
Phor 867 Karnal, Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Firozpur, Shahpur, Mianwali, Montgomery and Dera Ghazi Khan
Kalera 855 Shahpur and Mianwali
Dhandu 844 Bahawalpur
Autrah 843 Muzaffargarh
Domra 822 Dera Ghazi Khan
Pattiwala 816 Multan
Awrah 814 Jhang
Sapral 807 Montgomery and Lyallpur
Basar 807 Multan
Baghoor 807 Shahpur
Phaphra 802 Jhelum
Sattar 801 Jhang
Gandhu 795 Nabha, Patiala, Karnal, Ambala and Hoshiarpur
Koral 794 Bahawalpur
Darakhe 785 Dera Ghazi Khan
Wahiniwal 782 Shahpur, Jhang and Lyallpur (Faisalabad)
Unu 777 Mianwali
Chavan 775 Multan
Hanbi 769 Dera Ghazi Khan
Langra 766 Multan
Kanwan 760 Amritsar, Shahpur, Jhang, and Lyallpur
Sailigar 757 Multan
Mahla 755 Hisar, Jind, Ludhiana, Gujranwala, Jhelum, and Muzaffargarh
Parkar 753 Multan
Bandechha 750 Amritsar, Gujranwala and Lyallpur
Tama 746 Jhelum and Gujrat
Dahral 738 Shahpur
Khanda 734 Jhelum
Hujjan 733 Dera Ghazi Khan
Atral 733 Bahawalpur
Godara 733 Patiala, Jind, Hisar and Lyallpur
Bhatia 733 Bahawalpur
Malhan 732 Dera Ghazi Khan
Hundal 725 Amritsar, Attock, Lyallpur and Montgomery 
Khaloti 720 Dera Ghazi Khan
Otrai 718 Dera Ghazi Khan
Auntal 716 Karnal, Ambala, Hoshiarpur, Jalandhar and Ludhiana
Kalyar 715 Gujrat, Shahpur and Jhang
Bal 714 Karnal, Ambala, Amritsar, Ludhiana, Jalandhar, Kapurthala, Faridkot, Gurdaspur, Sialkot, Lahore, and Gujranwala
Rai 714 Ambala, Jalandhar, Hoshiarpur, Kapurthala,
Ludhiana, Firozpur, Lahore, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Sialkot, and Gujranwala
Jatal 710 Jhelum
Ghogha 710 Jhelum
Aujhanra 705 Sialkot
Hansi 691 Mianwali
Dangar 689 Bahawalpur
Rongia 689 Multan
Jhalli 686 Patiala, Jalandhar, Ludhiana, and Lyallpur
Purewal 675 Gujranwala, Sialkot, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Amritsar, Ludhiana, Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Shaikha 674 Multan
Mahran 673 Multan
Mander 664 Patiala, Rohtak, Kapurthala Firozpur and Lyallpur
Mohana 663 Dera Ghazi Khan
Makkal 662 Mianwali
Asran 662 Mianwali
Mangil 656 Dera Ghazi Khan
Sangra 653 Mianwali
Mahesar 648 Dera Ghazi Khan
Meo 641 Mianwali and Dera Ghazi Khan
Dhol 638 Dera Ghazi Khan
Bhadro 638 Montgomery and Multan
Kaloke 638 Lyallpur
Khombra 637 Bahawalpur
Ganda 637 Rawalpindi
Ghani 628 Dera Ghazi Khan
Manela 628 Bahawalpur
Dhindsa 627 Jind, Ludhiana, Jalandhar, Amritsar, Sialkot, Lahore, Gujranwala and Gujrat
Tarka 621 Patiala, Karnal, Rohtak, and Ambala
Jandral 618 Jhelum
Ruk 618 Multan
Khatti 612 Dera Ghazi Khan
Aura 610 Rawalpindi
Chandram 608 Multan
Kalhar 607 Mianwali
Bagar 623 Multan and Patiala
Samachi 599 Multan
Lohchab 598 Hisar, Karnal, and Firozpur
Panjootha 596 Gujrat and Shahpur
Abra / Abro 592 Gujrat, Shahpur, Jhang, Muzaffargarh and Bahawalpur
Ghorhawal 591 Mianwali
Bhander 589 Shahpur
Chahura 587 Mianwali
Bagril 586 Gujrat
Athar 581 Bahawalpur
Pukhowara 581 Multan
Hariar 579 Jhelum
Lapra 579 Multan
Brakha 579 Shahpur
Charal 578 Multan
Rayar 578 Sialkot and Gurdaspur
Serwal 572 Jhelum
Kajla 558 Hisar, Firozpur, Sialkot and Dera Ghazi Khan
Kande 557 Bahawalpur
Kabru 554 Dera Ghazi Khan
Jarola 550 Shahpur
Samri 549 Multan
Dohan 549 Hisar, Rohtak and Gujrat
Hindan 541 Rawalpindi
Kathal 538 Bahawalpur
Masson 537 Bahawalpur
Jauson 531 Lyallpur
Sanghera 525 Ambala, Ludhiana, Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Bir 524 Multan
Samtia 524 Mianwali
Dhamtal 520 Rawalpindi
Bipar 508 Bahawalpur
Sekhon 508 Firozpur, Lahore, Amritsar and Gujranwala
Bhawan 508 Shahpur
Deshwal 507 Hisar, Karnal and Rohtak
Chawali 506 Bahawalpur
Khinge 506 Lyallpur
Nissowana 505 Shahpur
Adhian 499 Jhang, Multan, Muzaffargarh and Dera Ghazi Khan
Kohawer 496 Mianwali
Gulia 473 Delhi, Patiala, Hoshiarpur and Sialkot
Billan 458 Patiala, Ambala and Hoshiarpur
Bangar 458 Hisar, Karnal and and Hoshiarpur
Bans 432 Patiala
Lohanch 420 Mianwali and Muzaffargarh
Chuna 415 Sialkot, and Gurdaspur
Khor / Khod 400 Hisar
Ghangas 363 Hisar and Jind
Dagur 363 Hisar, Gurgaon and Rohtak
Shergill 355 Patiala, Ludhiana, Gujranwala and Gujrat
Barang 348 Hisar, Jind, Ambala, Patiala, and Hoshiarpur
Dullat 328 Hisar, Patiala, Jind State, and Karnal
Bhalan 321 Karnal, Patiala, and Hoshiarpur
Dhawe 304 Patiala, Jalandhar and Ludhiana
Ghahi 301 Multan
Hattar 285 Jhelum and Shapur
Banon 285 Gujranwala
Turkhel 255 Mianwali
Bhalotia 242 Ludhiana
Sehwag / Sohag 225 Hisar, Jind and Patiala
Jassar 225 Patiala, Hoshiarpur and Ludhiana
Mami 223 Sialkot, and Gurdaspur
Janjhar 223 Patiala
Tiwana 216 Patiala
Pawania 207 Hisar, Karnal and Patiala
Balagan 199 Gujrat and Sialkot
Basati 198 Patiala and Ambala
Narwal 191 Hisar and Firozpur
Dhandhe 187 Firozpur, Ludhiana and Patiala
Khandi 181 Hisar and Jind
Jatana 176 Hisar, Karnal and Patiala
Sudhan 175 Rawalpindi
Sheoran 174 Hisar and Gurgaon
Dabdal 173 Hisar and Karnal
Arwal 166 Dera Ghazi Khan and Muzaffargarh
Jawanda 163 Patiala and Nabha
Rathi / Rathee 163 Hisar and Rohtak
Jawana 163 Patiala
Agrawal 160 Hisar, Jalandhar, Ludhiana and Firozpur
Kadian 153 Delhi, Karnal and Ambala
Baghial 149 Rawalpindi
Nagyana 144 Shahpur
Lahar 129 Hisar and Firozpur
Maalta 121 Multan
Bore 120 Gurgaon and Patiala
Raparia 119 Patiala and Hisar
Achlana 118 Muzaffargarh
Mandi 114 Jalandhar, Ludhiana and Patiala
Sunar 107 Rohtak
Khatri 105 Delhi, Karnal and Rohtak
Narwan 100 Hisar, Karnal and Patiala
Kali Rauni 95 Patiala
Gailan 91 Hisar and Jalandhar
Awal 80 Jalandhar annd Faridkot
Maghial 72 Rawalpindi
Ahlawat 70 Hissar, Karnal and Rohtak
Saran 67 Rohtak
Lamba 65 Patiala
Sodhi 65 Patiala
Bachal 63 Ambala
Sawaich 60 Hisar
Sarwara 58 Patiala
Hari 49 Patiala
Gurne 48 Patiala
Boria 46 Rawalpindi
Dhankhar 45 Patiala
Baliyan 43 Rohtak
Rattiwal 37 Patiala
Dandiwal 34 Hisar
Bator 33 Patiala
Dalal 33 Rohtak
Chanhan 26 Hisar
Mial 25 Rawalpindi
Jaglan 25 Hisar
Kandoe 24 Patiala
Maindal 22 Patiala
Sarao 17 Patiala
Sinhmar 14 Jind

Bohar, Chachar, Chhajra and Parhar tribes

In this post I will look at four tribes, namely the Bohar, Chachar, Chhajra and Parhar, whose territory stretches from Sargodha in the north to Bahawalpur. In terms of distribution, all four of these tribes have a substantial presence in Sindh as well, but in this blog I will only look at their position in Punjab. Three of these tribes, namely the Bohar, Chhajra and Parhar have traditions of migrating from Rajasthan, and settling in Bahawalpur. The Bohar still have a substantial presence in the Cholistan region, where they are still nomadic.

Bohar

The Bohar are a tribe of Jat status, with quite a few still found as nimads in the Cholistan desert. According to their tribal traditions, the Bohar claim descent from Bohar a Panwar Rajput, who is said to have converted to Islam by the famous Sufi saint Syed Jalal of Uch Sharif. The Bohar were involved in conflict with the Naich, another Jat tribe, and the Sayyid tried to stop the conflict, by asking the two tribes to intermarry. While the Bohar agreed, the Naich refused, and killed their Bohar son-in-laws. As such, the Bohar dispersed into the Cholistan and Jaisalmer deserts, where many are still nomadic. However, the Bohar of Sargodha, Multan and Dera Ghazi Khan are settled farmers, no different from the other Jat tribes of the region.

 

Bohar Villages

In Hasilpur, they are found in Bohar Wali Gali.

In Lodhran District found in the village of Basti Gareban near the town of Kehror Paka

In Dera Ghazi Khan District, Bohar villages include Basti Shah Ali Bohar, Wah Bohar and Bohar.

In Rajanpur District, their main village is Basti Bohar.

In Okara District, Boharwala is their main village.

In Pakpattan District, Bohar is their main village.

In Multan District their main villages are Bohar Lodhran and Bohar.

In Vehari District, their main village is Bohar.

In Rajanpur,their main village is Basti Bohar

Chachar

Chachar are Jat clan found in Sindh, Punjab, and Balochistan. Like most tribes of the Indus plain, they are a number of traditions as to their origin, which are often contradictory. Among the Bahawalpur Chachar, a strong claim is made to Barlas Mughal ancestry. In this tradition, Chachar is a prince, who is a descendent of Timur or Tamerlane. However, the Chachar of Ghotki have traditions that they are Abbasi Arabs, descendents of the Prophet’s uncle Abbas ibn Abdul Mutalib. It interesting to note, that in the Ghotki Sukkur region of Sindh, several tribes such as the Kalhoras and Daudpotas have tradition of Abbasi descent. Despite these claims to Arab or Mughal ancestry, the Chachar are considered by their neighbours and themselves as Jats, and intermarry with tribes of Jat status. In Bahawalpur, the Chachars have several septs : — Raj-de, the highest in status ; Rahmani, whose ancestors were khalifas of Ghaus Baha-ud-Din Zakariya : hence they are also called Shaikh-Rahmani, and some sanctity still attaches to the sept ; Narang, Jugana, Jhunjha, Chhutta, Gureja, Rukana, Kalra, Mudda, Duwani, Dohija, Gabrani, Muria, Kharyani and Zakriani or followers of Ghaus Baha-ud-Din Zakariya.

In Punjab they are found in Sargodha, Multan, Bahawalpur, Rahim Yar Khan, Okara and Lodhran districts, with Basirpur in Okara District being an important village of this tribe. In Sindh, the Chachars are foundi n Pano Aqil, Ghotki, Sukkur and Kashmore districts. Gamero, Haji Khan Chachar, Essa chachar, Dari and Yusuf Chachar are some Chachar villages in Ghotki District.

 

Chhajra

The Chhajra are a Saraiki speaking Jat clan, and distinct from the Shajra clan, who I have looked at in another post. They claim descent from the Bhatti tribe of Jaisalmer. They came to Multan under Rao Kehar, a chieftain of Jaisalmer, and settled there. There are several individuals by the name of Kehar, who played an important role in Bhatti history. One such Kehar was a contemporary of the Caliph Walid, who is said to have extended the Bhati kingdom of Jaisalmer. Another, who is said to have ruled Jaisalmer in the 16th Century, and conquered all the country up the Indus. It is not clear, which Kehar is being referred to by the Chhajras, but their Bhati descent is accepted by the neighbouring tribes. However, the Chhajras seem unsure as to why Rao Kehar left Jaisalmer, other then the fact he somehow lost power.

In terms of distribution, the Chhajra are largely found in they are found mainly along the Indus, in Muzaffargarh, Rajanpur, Layyah and Multan districts. Important villages in that district include Bindah Ishaq Kallarwali, Manikwali, Sharif Chhajra, Bet Chhajra, Nuran Chhajra, Muslim Chhajra, qabul Chhajra Shumali, Qabul Chhajra Junubi, Bibipur Chhajra and Qadirpur Chhajra

In Layyah District, their main village is Chhajra.

In Multan District, their main village is Jhok Chhajra.

 

Parhar

The Parhar are a tribe of Jat status, with a very interesting background. They claim descent from the Parihar Rajputs. So exactly were these Parihar or Pratiharas Rajputs. They were a medieval Indian dynasty, descended from the Gurajara- Pratihara tribe, which said to have invaded India, in the 5th Century.The Parhar Jats, are all that remains of the Pratihara presence in the Punjab. They were forced to migrate from south-central Asia in 3-4th century AD due to the White Hun invasions. The Parhar Jat traditions are unclear as to whether the Parhar are survivors of the White Hun invaders, and latter migrants. In Bahawalpur, the Parhar have traditions of migration from Ajmer, and it does seem likely the present Parhar are latter migrants from Rajasthan. It is interesting to note that the nomadic Rath found in Bikaner have a sub-division called the Parhar. The Parhar seem to have migrated up the valleys of the Chenab and Jhelum, a large number are now found in Sargodha, Layyah and Bhakkar districts.

 

The Parhar are now found in Dera Ghazi Khan, Muzaffargarh, Jhang, Rajanpur and Sargodha districts of Punjab. Their main village in Dera Ghazi Khan District is Passo Parhar. In Muzaffargarh District, their main villages are Mohammed Parhar, Ghulam Parhar, Parhar Gharbi, and Parhar Sharqi. In Rajanpur Parhar villages include Mullawala, Nooraywala, and Chah Ladywala.

 

In Okara District, their main village is Parhar. In Sargodha District, their main villages are Adrehman, Chak No.17 NB,Chak No 1NB Gakhra, Ganula Sharif and Ratto Kala..

Mallana, Samtia / Samitiah, Sandhila and Sehar tribes

In this post, I shall look at four tribes that are found largely in the uplands of the Chenab and Indus rivers, now forming part of Bhakkar, Layyah and Muzaffargarh districts. This region goes by the name of the Sindh Sagar Doab (the land between the Indus and Chenab rivers), and is frontier region in terms of both politics and culture. The Jats were probably the earliest settlers, but many Jat tribes have vague traditions of migration from Jaisalmeer or Bikaner in Rajasthan.

Mallana

I shall start off by looking at the Mallana, who are a tribe of Jat status. According to their traditions, the Mallana claim descent from Mallana, said to be a Barlas Mughal trooper in the army of the Emperor Akbar. Mallana is said to have settled in Gujrat. His descendants contracted marriage with the Jats tribes, settled in the region. The name Mallana follows the pattern where the suffix aana signifies a descendent, for exam the descendents of teu are the Tiwana and so forth.

 

Although the Mallana claim to be Mughals, they are seen by others and themselves as Jats. Over the centuries, they have spread as far west as Dera Ismail Khan District, in Khyber Pakhtukhwa. Prior to the partition of India, they were also found in Jalandhar District, their main villages being Burj Sherpur, Jodhuwal, Mithewal and Malikwal, all of whom migrated to Pakistan at the time of partition. Those settled in southern Punjab speak the Seraiki language, while those in the north speak Punjabi.

Distribution and Villages

They are found mainly in Layyah, Bhakkar, Dera Ghazi Khan, and Gujrat districts of Punjab.

Their main village in Dera Ghazi Khan District are Bet Mallana, Hadir Mallana and Basti Mallana and Malana.

In Gujrat District, the village of Mallana, and neighbouring hamlets are held by the Mallana.

In Muzaffargarh District, the villages of Lang Mallana and Paunta Mallana, Bet Malana and Chhina Mallana.

In Multan District, the village of Binda Mallana.

In Khanewal District, the village of Kot Mallana.

In Bhakkar District, Chah Dhirkanwala near Cheena and Mallana Daggar are important villages.

In Layyah District, Chak 436 TDA

In Khushab District in Rahdari and Pillow Waince

In Dera Ismail Khan District, Haji Mora and Mallana (Kacha,Pakka) are important villages.

Samtiah

The Samtia, sometimes pronounced Samtiah or even Samitah, claim Rajput extraction and tell the following story of their origin; Ram Chandar and Gonda, two brothers adopted Islam under Sultan Allaudin Khilji of Delhi. They then assumed the names of Muharam and Variam respectively.T he former was appointed Kardar or governor of Sindh and with his brother came to that country, where he married the daughter of the old governor. But the population rose against the new governor, and the two brothers fled with their kinsmen. The settled in the Sindh Sagar Doab, near the city of Layyah. They overcame the Gashkori Baloch and Bahalim Shaikhs, who occupied the country. They were in turn dispossed by Seharr Jats, who drove them from the western parts of Layyah and Bhakkar districts. The Samtia and Seharr are still biter rivals. Other traditions connect them to the Bakhar caste of Jats, and according to some traditions Ram Chander and Gonda were Bhakkar by caste.

In terms of distribution, the Samtia are found mainly in Layyah, Muzaffargarh and Dera Ghazi Khan districts.

In Layyah District, there villages include Ada Qaziabad, Bangla Nasir Khan, Basti Shahdu Khan, Basti Rajanpur, Basti Eliani Bhaggal, Bhatti Nagar, Chak 138 TDA, Chak No.119/T.D.A, Chak 220 TDA ,Chak 270 TDA, Chak 143 TDA, Chak 152 TDA, Dhhal, Dorrata, Heera, Hafizabad, Ghulam Hyder Kalluwala, Jamanshah, Kasaiwala, Kazmi Chouk, Kaneywali Puli, Latifabad, Kotla Haji Shah, Kharral Azeem, Kot Sultan, Noshera, Shahpur, Rajanpur Darbar, Paharpur and Warraich, and the city of Chouk Azam.

Sandhila

The Sandhila, like the other clans discussed, are a Seraiki speaking tribe of Jat status. According to tribal traditions, they claim descent from a Rai Sandhila, a

Hindu Jat who came from the neighbourhood of Delhi, during the rule of the Mughal Emperor Shah Jahan, and settled in Multan. Here he is said to have converted to Islam, and along with his kinsmen, established control in the Chenab valley, west of the city of Multan. With rise of the Multan Nawabs, and their Pathan allies of Khangarh in Muzzafargarh, the Sandhila lost their independence.

The Sandhila in are found all along the Indus, from Mianwali in the north to Rajanpur in the south, and between Layyah and Panchnad in the Chenab valley.In Sindh, they are found mainly in Sukkur and Ghotki districts.

Villages

In Muzaffargarh District, the villages of Sandhila, Basti Sandhila, Bhammu Sandhila, Bullu Sandhila, Kuhal Sandhila, Massa Sandhila and Pakka Sandhila are centre of the tribe.

In Dera Ghazi Khan District, the villages of Sultan Sandhila, Gadi Sandhila and Gaman Sandhila are important centres of the tribe.

In Rajanpur District, the villages of Chak Sandhila and Babulwali.

In Multan District, the villages of Binda Sandhila and Tajpur Sandhila.

In Shujabad Tehsil of Multan, the villages of Sandhila, Warcha Sandhila and Mohana Sandhila.

In Sheikhupura District, the village of Mahmunwali is centre of the tribe.

In Bhakkar District, the village of Dhengana is center of the tribe. Near Dhingana, important Sandhila villages include Cheenawala and Goharwala.

In Layyah District, the tribe is scarted in Tehsil Chaubara and Karor Lal Esan

Sehar

The next tribe that I will look at are the Seher, or sometimes pronounced as Seer, who are of Jat status. They are found mainly in southern Punjab, and in particular in Layyah District, and said to have founded the town of Kahror Lal Essan. The Sehar are said to have originating in Las Bela, and were invited to settle near Kahror Lal Isa by the Sufi Makhdum Lal Isa, who also appears in the origin myth of the Lohanch tribe, discussed in another post.

 

An interesting legend is associated with the Sehar. According to this, the Sehar were settled on the banks of the Indus near where Dera Ghazi Khan now stands. A group of Sehar women were making pilgrimage to the shrine of Lal Isa. On their way home, the Samtia chief Miru forced them to unveil themselves. This led to a fierce feud between these two tribes, which in effect saw the movement of the Seher into the Thal Desert. Eventually, a faqir of the Qureshi caste divided the village of Muranwala, and settled there himself. The area is still held by the Qureshi families. What this legend suggest is a gradual migration of Jat tribes from Sindh into southern Punjab that occurred in the later middle ages.

In terms of distribution the Sehar are found mainly in Layyah District.

Bhangu, Jotah / Joota, Naul, Nonari and Sahu tribes

In this post, I shall be looking at tribes found not only in the Kirana Bar, but also in the Sandal and Neeli Bars. For example, the bulk of the Nonari and Sahu are settled in the Neeli Bar, but groups have left the parent tribe to settle in others parts, for example Jotah groups are found in Layyah District, while the Nonari country extends from the Indus to Sultlej. Almost all the tribes of have traditions of migration from Rajasthan, with an ancestor fleeing to the Bar, converted to Islam at the hands of a Sufi saint, and contracting marriages with locals, and thus becoming Jats. Interestingly, almost none of these tribes have tradition of aboriginal descent, with the possible exception of the Bhangu and Jotah. Both the Bhangu and Jotah also have traditions that they have always been Jat. Among the three tribes being looked, most now live in Chiniot, Jhang, Sahiwal, Okara and Faisalabad districts, there are some traditions of Brahman descent, which if true shows the fluid nature of the society in the Bar. In this post, I shall look at the Bhangu, Jotah, Naul, Nonari and Sahu. Time permitting, in the future I want to look at the numerically important Kharal tribe. Among the three, the first is fairly widespread with a presence in North Punjab, but the Naul and Nonari are classic Bar nomads. Below is a list of tribes classified in Jhang District (present day Jhang and Chiniot districts):

Below is a list of tribes classified in Jhang District (present day Jhang and Chiniot districts):

Tribe

 Jhang Tehsil  Chiniot Tehsil  Shorkot Tehsil

Total

Awrah

164

51

599

814

Chadhar

1,942

1,112

360

3,414

Dhudhi

74

65

461

600

Gilotar

14

1,475

1,497

Ganda

421

216

637

Gill

529

29

558

Gondal

229

565

106

900

Gujjar

694

386

185

1,265

Harral

2,285

2,590

133

4,988

Hidan

116

749

49

914

 Hanjra

908

139

129

1,176

 Heer

580

2

2

584

Joiya

404

998

319

1,721

Juta

365

151

28

544

Kalasan

183

188

162

533

Kaloke

23

520

95

638

Kanwan

34

644

678

Kharal

871

716

205

1,792

Khichi

178

176

227

581

Khokhar

3,185

1,605

3,876

8,666

Kudhan

724

122

199

1,045

Lak

760

378

181

1,310

Lali

87

1,501

1,640

Lana

650

361

1,011

Mahra

381

216

597

Mahun

877

588

6

1,471

Marral

313

464

49

826

Maru

954

2

956

Naul

338

269

1,529

2,136

Nonari

566

289

128

983

Noon

434

383

216

1,089

 Rajoke

1,072

73

117

1,262

Sahmal

746

156

92

994

Sattar

781

2

18

801

Sial

437

55

103

595

Sipra

1,333

969

790

3,092

Thabal

15

969

35

1019

I would also ask you to look at the list in Jhang district, which is referred to in the post on the Chadhars. Some of these tribes that are listed separately are actually clans of the Chadhar, such as the Thabal, Kaloke and Rajoke.

Bhangu

Bhangu, also pronounced Bhangoo, and even Bhango is a Jat gotra or clan mainly found in the Punjab state of North India, Sindh and Punjab province of Pakistan. In this post I shall only be looking at the Muslim branch, in particular those found in the Shorkot region of Jhang District. The Bhangu have a tradition that they have always been Jat, and those in Jhang claim to be the earliest settlers, predating the Chadhars, Gilotars, Sials, Nissowanas, who acknowledge that Bhangu were there before them. It is quite possible, the Jhang was the first settlement in the Punjab.

Reference is made by early Arab historians, to a tribe called Bhangoo, who were the lords of “Budhiya” around present day Sehwan, Sindh, Pakistan. According to tribal traditions, Kaka was the son of Kotal, and the grandson of Bhandargu Bhangoo, who may or may not be the Bhangoo refered by Arab historians. Historians like Andre Wink have referred to the migration of Jat tribes from Sindh to Punjab, leading to settlement as farmers, and often conversion to Islam. Certainly, the Bhangu are said to be the rulers of Jhang, before their displacement by the Chadhars, who in turm were overthrown by the Sial. Like their neighbours, the Shorkot Bhangu were pastoral nomads, who lost their lands as Shorkot was opened to the settlement in the 19th Century. Unlike the Bar Bhangus, groups migrated further east, and settled in the Majha and Malwa regions, as well as Gunjranwala. These were essentially farmers, although Gujranwala Bhangu had longer traditions of pastoralism. Some of these adopted the Sikh faith, while others became Muslim.

Outside Shorkot, Bhangu, both Sikh and Muslim were found throughout central Punjab from Lyalpur (now Faisalabad) to Ludhiana. At the time of Partition, Sikh Bhangus of Sialkot and Gujranwala moved to India, while Muslims from Amritsar and Jallandhar moved to Pakistan. In Shorkot, the Bhangu villages include Basti Mujahidabad, Bhangu Sharqi, Chah Jandan Wala, Chah Tahli Wala Bhangoo, Chah Lal Wala, Chah Budh Wala, Kot Mapal Bhangoo, Kothi Sultan Mehmood Bhangu, Kikranwala, Mauza Bhangoo and Chak 7 Gagh.

 

 Jotah / Joota

The next clan that I will are the Jotah, which sometimes spelt as Joota. Like the Bhangu, the Jotah have no tradition of migration, which thus point to a possible aboriginal descent. They are a clan of pastoral Jats, who have always resided in the Chenab Jhelum Doab, who make no claim to Rajput ancestry. According to tribal traditions, the word juta is derived from the Seraiki word jutna which means to plough a field.

The Jotah are found mainly in the Shorkot Tehsil of Jhang District, and their main villages are Allahyar Juta, Chak 7 Gagh, Chak 233 JB, Kotla Zarif Khan, Mauza Mahla and Yarewala, north of the city of Shorkot. West of Jhang, the Joota villages in Layyah District include Chak No 152TDA and Haider Kalluwala. In Khanewal District, they are found in the villages of Jato Kassi, Karampur Juta, Kot Kathia Juta, Khan Bahadurgarh, Chak Hyderabab, Kukkar Hatta, Salarwahin, Inyatpur, Mulapur and Faridpur. While in Khushab in the heart of the Thal Desert, there are several Juta families in the large village of Noorpur Thal. In Sahiwal District their villages include Chak No. 18/14 L Iqbalnagar, Chak NO.14/14L, Chak No.20/14L, Chak No.31/12L, Chak No.28/14L, Chak No.103/12L, Chak No.101/12L and Chak 58G.D Bahadar Shah.

Naul

The Naul are a tribe of Jat status, Like the Langrials, discussed earlier, there are traditions that Naul are of Brahman decent. Naul, there ancestor was a Brahman of Bikaner, who migrated to the Neeli Bar, adopted Islam, and married into a Jat family. Other traditions however refer to Naul being a Rajput, the elder son of Raja Dhaan, the Rajput ruler of Bikaner in Rajasthan. He is said to have accepted at the hands of Baba Farid, the Sufi saint now buried at Pakpattan, a city located in the Neeli Bar. After their conversion to Islam, the Naul occupied lowlands of the Chenab round Jhang before the Sials. With the arrival of the Sials, said to be around the 15th Century, the Naul were pushed deeper in the Bar. For a short period after the arrival of the Sial, the Sials were subject to the Nauls and paid tribute. However, with the support of the Lodhi Sultans of Delhi, they ended Naul rule. As pastoral nomads, the Naul migrated through a wide portion of the Sandal Bar and Vichanh areas in the Chaj Doab. With rise of Sikh power, the Naul independence finally came to an end, and with the rise of the British, most of the Naul area was subject to large scale colonization,

 

There are still more then three hundred settlements ain the low areas of Rivers Satluj in Kasur and along the Chenab in District Jhang. Most of the tribe are settled in districts of Kasur, Sahiwal, Okara, Sheikhupura, Nankana Sahib. Important Naul settlements include Haveli Lakha in Okara, and Chak 227 JB, Chak 230 JB, and Chak 232 JB in Jhang District.

Nonari

I shall next look at the Nonari, sometimes also spelt Nunari, are a tribe of Jat status found mainly in the Neeli Bar region. Although found mainly in what is now Sahiwal, Okara and Khanewal districts, Nonari settlements also exist in the Kirana Bar in what is now Sargodha District. According to their own tribal traditions, they are descendent of a Rajah Karan, ruler of Anhilvara Pattan in what is now Gujerat in India, who was defeated by the Khilji Ala-ud-Din in 1297 and again in 1307. This Rajah Karan and his kinsmen are said to have fled to the Neeli Bar, where they accepted Islam at the hands of the Sufi saint, Mukhdum-i-Jehaniyan. This would make the Nonari a branch of the Solanki or Chalukya tribe of Rajputs.

 

Over the centuries Nonari power declined as the Kharal and Joiyas reduced their area of influence. As the Nonari contracted marriages with other tribes of Jat status, they became absorbed into the Jat community. So this is what the Nonari say of their origin. However the Nonari does sound a lot like Nona or salt, and there is caste of workers that produce salt called the Nungar. There may be some connection, but the Nonari are seen as by most of their neighbours as of Jat status, and were recognized as such by the British colonial authorities. Like the Naul, the coming of the British meant they could not practice nomadic pastoralism, and were forced to settle.

In terms of distribution, they are found in Jhang, Layyah, Muzaffargarh, Sahiwal, Multan, Lodhran and Khanewal. Starting with Jhang, they are found in Chak 7 Gagh and Chak 230 JB.

Sahu

The Sahu are a tribe of Jat status, found mainly near the towns of Tulamba and Kabirwala. They are a branch of the Chauhan tribe. They originate from the Marwar region of Rajasthan, where a good many Sahu are still found. In Marwar, the Sahu were ruler of a small republic, who capital was the village of Dhansia, situated at a distance of 65 km in northwest of Churu. The various Jat republics were eventually conquered by the Rathore Rajputs. When the Rathore were expanding their control, groups of Sahu left Rajasthan, and settled near Tulamba. Their presence in Tulamba is attested by the Ain-Akbari, which made reference to the Sahu occupying Tulamba, near Multan in the 15th Century. They are considered one of the oldest established tribe in the Multan region. Like other migrants from Rajasthan, once the Sahu entered the Bar region, they converted to Islam. The Sahu have produced the famous Sufi Khawja Sufi Allahdad Sahu, whose shrine is in the town of Sheikh Fazil in Vehari District.

In terms of distribution, they are found mainly in Khanewal and Vehari districts. In Khanewal District, important Sahu villages include Mouza Hussainpur Aari Wala, near the town of Tulamba, Maari Sahu, Rehana Sahu and Qaim Sahu. While in Jhang District, they are found in Chak 228 JB. The village of Mouza Sahu near Makhdoom Rasheed, in Multan District, according to Sahu traditions is their oldest settlement in Punjab.