Badhan / Wadhan, Kanjial and Rachyal tribes

In this post, I will look at three tribes, namely the Badhan, Kunjial and Rachyal, who are found mainly in the southern region of Azad Kashmir, and neighbouring districts of Punjab namely Rawalpindi, Jhelum, Gujrat and Sialkot. In Indian administered Kashmir, there are concentration in Rajouri and the Mendhar Tehsil of Poonch. I will use this post to give a brief description of the Jat population within the princely state of Jammu and Kashmir.

Most of the Jat population was found either in the Duggar Region, about 15% or in the Chibhal Region the remaining 85%. Although the Chibhal region, took its name from the Chib clan of the Rajputs who were the traditional rulers of this area, the Jat population was almost twice that of the Rajputs. The Chibs converted to Islam in mid-17th Century, and other Rajput sub-castes followed suit. It is very likely that most of the Jat also converted at that time. However it is worth pointing out that the Jat and Rajput tribes tended to have a common origin, with CLAIMS TO Rajputhood based mostly on whether a clan had achieved political power or not. Outside Mirpur and Bhimber tehsils, there were several Jat communities in Rajouri (then part of Reasi) and Poonch. Separate from these Jats of the Jammu and Kathua (Duggar) region, who were Punjabi speaking, belonging mainly to the Badhan, Bajwa, Kahlown, Nagra and Randhawa clans, and were really an overspill of the Jats of Sialkot and Gurdaspur. Most of the Muslim Jat villages were located in Ranbir Singh Pura and Bishnah tehsils of Jammu and Samba District. Below is a breakdown of the total Jat population according to the 1931 Census:

District

Muslim

Hindu

Sikh

Total

Jammu

9,258

7,014

506 16,778

Kathua

175

1,549

47

 1,771

Udhampur

100

152

 252

Reeasi

2,443

27

12

 2,482

Mirpur

103,095

14,460

4,951

122,506

Poonch Jagir

4,808

65

 4,873

Other Districts

204

131

103

438

Total

120,083

23,371

5,619

149,073

As the 1931 census shows, most of the Jat population numbering about 122,506, of whatever religion were found in the old Mirpur District, where the Jats formed more than a third of the total population of 344,747. Most of these areas now forms part of Azad Kashmir, except the area around Nawshera, traditionally part of Bhimber Tehsil, which is now under Indian administration. Most of the Hindu and Sikh Jat population was found in the Deva-Batala area, now part of the modern day district of Bhimber. The division of the Chibhal region in 1948 led to the migration of the Hindu and Sikh population, while the Muslim Jats left the area around Nowshera that came under Indian control. Similarly, the Muslim Jats of Jammu and Kathua also immigrated to Pakistan. There is still a small Muslim Jat population in Rajouri and Mendhar in Indian administered Jammu and Kashmir.

The Jat of Jammu and Kashmir are further sub-divided into numerous clans called gots or gotras. Technically members of a Jat got are supposed to be descended from a traditional common ancestor by agnatic descent, i.e. through male line only. Another interesting thing about the various Jat tribes in Chibhal is that there name often ends in al, which is patronymic, for example, the sons of Kals, are the Kalyal and so on, very similar to the Arabic Bin or Slavic ovich or ov. The aals started off as clans of a larger tribe, so the Kanjial are a branch of the Janjua, who have now evolved into a separate tribe. Unlike the Jats of the Punjab plains, where one large clan often has several villages, in the Chibhal we have numerous clans often occupying the same village. I my other posts, I have looked at and posted about Jat tribes that have a presence in the Chibhal, such as the Bangyal, Gujral, Hayal, Kanyal, Kalyal, Bhakral (or Pakhreel), Matyal, Nagyal and Thathaal.

Badhan

I start off this post by looking at the Badhan, sometimes pronounced as Wadhan, also known as Pakhai, who are generally considered as a Jat tribe, but have also claimed to be Rajput. Like many Punjabi tribes, there are several traditions as to the origin of the tribe. There are in fact two origin stories, one connected with eastern Badhan, those found in Gujrat, Sialkot/Narowal, and historically in Jammu and Gurdaspur, and the western group found in Sudhnoti, Kotli, Jhelum and Rawalpindi (mainly Kahuta). Under the various censuses carried by the British in the early 20th Century, the Badhan of central Punjab generally registered them themselves as Jats, and this included those of Jammu, while in Pothohar and Mirpur/Poonch, most Badhan registered themselves as Rajputs.
I shall off by looking at the traditions of the eastern Badhan first. Among many Sialkot Badhans, Jats, that they were a branch of the mythical Saroa Rajputs and descended from Kala, a resident of Jammu. However, a more common traditions was that the Badhan, there ancestor was descended from of Gillpal (Gilpal), son of a Rajput King, Pirthipal, Raja of Garh Mithila and a Waria (Baryah) Rajput by a Bhular Jat wife. This would make the Badhan a branch of the Gill tribe, and indeed the Sikh Badhan Jatts of Gurdaspur and Jammu do not marry the Gills, as they consider themselves to be a branch of the Gills. Judge or Juj was the second son of Gillpal, was the ancestor of Badhan Gills. The tribe gets its name from Badhan, the great grandson of Juj.
The western Badhan have an entirely different tradition. According to them, there ancestor Badhan was a Janjua Rajput of Kahuta, who settled among the Sudhans. In fact, in the Sudhnoti region of Poonch, the Badhan are often confused with the Sudhans, and a few Badhans actually claim themselves to be a branch of the Sudhans. In Sudhnoti, the occupy several villages near the Jhelum river. A smaller section also claims to be Qutabshahi Awans. What is clear is that in this western region, the Badhan occupy a quasi-Jat status, while among the eastern group, a claim to be Jat is generally accepted.

In Rawalpindi, there are several Badhan villages such as Parhali (in Tehsil Kahuta) and Rawat. In Sudhnuti, important Badhan villages include Basari, Rakar, Neeryan, Sahr Kakota, Noursa, Hamrata, and Kohala.

Kanjial

The Kanjial are found mainly in Gujrat, Bhimber, Mirpur and Jhelum districts. According to tribal traditions, there ancestor was a Ghalla, a Janjua Rajput, who had three sons, Bhakari, their ancestor, Natha (ancestor of the Nathial) and Kunjah (ancestor of the Kunjial). However, some traditions make Rai Kunjah to be a Bhatti.
In Mirpur, Kanjial villages include Andrah Kalan, Khandora and other villages in the Islamgarh Tehsil of Mirpur.

Rachyal

Finally, I will look at the Rachyal, sometimes spelt Richyal, who are a Jat tribe, found mainly in the Kotli and Mirpur districts of Azad Kashmir. Like the Kahlotra already mentioned, the Rachyal are a clan of Dogras, whose roots like in the Chamba region of what is now Himachal Pradesh. There ancestor was a Ranchan Dev, a Hindu Rajput of the Kashyap gotra, who said to have converted to Islam in the 16th Century. Generally, among the Rajputs of the Himachal region, each clan was connected with a Hindu rishi, who was traditional spiritual ancestor. Looking at Kashyapa, he is one of Saptarishi, the seven famed rishis and considered to be author of many hymns and verses of the Rigveda (1500-1200 BCE). It is likely that the Rachyal are branch of the Katoch Rajputs, as they belonged to the Kashyap gotra.

According to tribal folklore, once the Rachyals converted to Islam they were forced out of Chamba and its surroundings and we see them migrating to Sialkot, Sheikhupura, and Jhang areas of Punjab in Pakistan. The tribe then re-entered the Jammu state via Dhuki village through Sarai-Alamgir (near Kharian, Punjab, Pakistan) which lies in district of Mirpur around three hundred years ago. They then moved to Mangla and eventually to a place called Ladna near now Chakswari. From here the Rachyals spread farther west and the estate of Panyam came into existence. Most of the Rachyal are still found either in Chakswari or Panyam, where several of their villages are found such as Pothi,and Chamba. Some Rachyals villages are found further north near Naar, Rajdhani, Poonch and Rajouri.

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Description of Major Muslim Communities in India: Muslim Kamboh

In this post, I return to the state of Uttar Pradesh (UP), and the Muslim communities that inhabit it. In particular, I will look at the Muslim Kambohs, a Muslim community that is part of the wider Kamboh ethnic group of South Asia. They are also known as Zubairi. The Muslim Kamboh are found mainly in the Rohilkhand and Doab region. They are entirely Sunni and speak Urdu. They are fairly small community, but played a major role in the history of Western Uttar Pradesh. Like the Gujjars and Bhattis discussed in my earlier posts, they are likely to have been immigrants from the Punjab.

Origin

There are a number of different traditions as to the origin of the Kamboh. Some Kamboh claim Afghan origin, others claim Arab origin, while others simply claim to be Muslim converts from the Hindu Kamboh caste.

• Those who claim Indian ancestry claim descent from Raja Sodakhsh of Kamboja, an ancient Indian kingdom. The Rajah was a descendent of the god Chandra Verman, and the Kambojas are referred to in the Mahabharata. They are said to have inhabited Afghanistan, which was known as Kamboja desa, or land of the Kamboh.

• Those who claim Afghan origin, claim to belong to the famous Kayani dynasty of ancient Iran. The word Kamboh is said to be a compound of the word Kai Ambo, after an ancestor. The descendents of this king were known as the Kamboh, and Ghazni in Afghanistan was a centre of their power.

• Those who claim Arab ancestry claim descent from Zubair ibn al-Awam, the first cousin of the Prophet Mohammad. According to this tradition, the original homeland of the Kamboh wasMultan and not Afghanistan.

It seems clear is that most Uttar Pradesh Kamboh have strong traditions of migrating from Punjab. Some groups, such as those of Bareilly claim that they were part of the army of Shahbaz Khan Kamboh, a general in the army of the Mughal Emperor Jehangir. He was asked to pacify a rebellion in Assam, and said to have come from Jalandhar in Punjab. Many in his army were Punjabi Kamboh, who instead of returning to Punjab settled in various locations in western Uttar Pradesh.

The exact circumstances of the Kamboh migration to Uttar Pradesh are unclear. However, towards the end of the Delhi Sultanate (1206–1526), we hear increasing references to the Kamboh as playing an important role in the politics. During the Lodhi and Moghul rule. Miyan Jumman Khan Kamboh was “Hajib-i-Khas” (Special Lord of Bed Chamber),Umar Khan Kamboh was Amir-i-Akhur (Minister of Cavalry department)[ and Miyan Ladan Khan Kamboh was an Imam and Royal Nadim of Sikandar Lodhi, Shaikh Itmad-ul-Malik Sambhal was Amir-i-Arz (Paymaster General) and then Prime Minister of Sher Shah Suri. Numerous other Kamboj are known to have occupied very key military and civil positions during Lodhi, Pashtun and the Moghul reign in India. Irfan Habib writes:

The Sayyids and the Kambohs among the Indian Muslims were specially favoured for high military and civil positions during Moghul rule”.
The Kambo, Indian Shaikhzadas and local Saiyid nobles rose to prominence during the period under review” (i.e. Lodi dynasty of Delhi).

According to the historian Muhammad Umar writes:

“The (Muslim) Kamboh distinguished themselves by their courage, generosity and high spirits. They were famous for their excellent manners and were particularly gifted with wisdom and nobility….In terms of social stratification, the Kambohs were counted among the Shaikhs…..Among the Indian Muslims, the Kambohs were regarded as the noblest of all. However, perhaps with a view to maintaining the purity of their descent, or because of pride of nobility, they confined their matrimonial relationships within their own groups and did not establish marriage connections with other Muslim groups including even the Saiyids and the Mughals. Some members of this clan like Shahbaz Khan Kamboh, Nawab Abu Muhammad Khan, Bahadur Khan and Nawab Khair Andesh Khan rose to high positions during the reign of Mughals”

Hindu origin

The tradition of a Hindu origin seems more prevalent among the Kamboh of Saharanpur District. According to tribal myths, they originally  lived about Mathura and were Kshatriyas. When Parasu Rama was slaughtering the Kshatriyas, he found their ancestor Bhup  Rae armed and ready resist. He, therefore, proposed  slaying him; and on Bhup Rae saying that he was not a Kshatriya,Parasu Ram is said to have replied that he was demenour was that of a  Kshatriyas. Bhup Rae at once objected that he was not qaim buu (of any fixed  odour) at all and was saved. He was afterwards was known as Qaimbn,
which gradually got changed into Kamboh. This legend was recorded in the late 19th Century by the ethnologist William Crooke, at the time most Hindu and Sikh Kamboh were making claims to Kshatriya.  What was clear was that both in Punjab, where the majority of Kambohs lived, and in western UP, they were seem by their neighbours as quasi-kshatriya.

 

Those who claim a Hindu origin, claim their conversion to Islam occurred during the early years of Islam in India, one of the groups of this clan embraced Islam at the instance of Shaikh Bahauddin Zakariya Suhrawardi (of Multan) and his son Shaikh Sadruddin. Their tradition refers to their migration from Multan to Saharanpur under during the rule of the Lodhi dynasty. It is interesting that Saharanpur District is also home to a large community of Hindu Kambohs. These Kamboh have largely remained affiliated with agriculture. In this district, they are believed to be one of sub caste of Jatts. This region may be the site of their earliest settlement in Uttar Pradesh.

 

Arab origin

The tradition of an Arab origin is more common among the Kamboh of Etah and Bareilly districts. They generally now prefer to be known as Zubairi. Zubairi literally means in Arabic a descendant of Zubair, and the Zubairi Kamboh claim descent Zubair ibn al-Awam. Zubair ibn al-Awam was the first cousin of the Prophet but was also one of his closest companions. He was known for his valor and bravery and is remembered as the conqueror of Egypt in 19 AH, and embraced martyrdom in 36 AH. Zubair was laid to rest in Basra, near the borders of Kuwait and Iraq. This town was named as Al-Zubair. Zubair had twelve sons and nine daughters. Three of his famous sons were Abdullah, Musab and Urwah. Abdullah was a Muslim caliph at Makkah, Musab was the governor of Kufa in 73 AH and Urwa was the first Muslim historian.

After almost fifty years of the conquest of Sindh by Muhammad Bin Qasim, Zuberis started migrating from Makkah and Medina towards Sindh. Most of them settled at place near modern Dadu. By the end of 4th century AH, Zuberis started migrating from Sindh to Multan. During 14th century AD, portion of Zuberi clan migrated to Delhi. Sheikh Samauddin Zuberi was a famous Sufi who led this migration. Afterwards Zuberi family flourished in Lahore, Panipat, Delhi and Sambhal. During the regime of Mughal Emperor Akbar, Zuberis also settled in Meerut.

Kamboh of Marehra, Etah District

The Kambohs of Marehra in Etah District claim to be Arab descent, and often call themselves Zubairi. There ancestor was Shaikh
Khwajah Imad-ud-din Muhammad , a native of Multan, who was a courtier of the first Mughal Emperor Babur (20 April 1526 – 26 December 1530). Babur appointed him amil (administrator) of Marehra around 1527.In 1542, during the reign of Sher Shah, the Khwaja’s two sons were appointed to the offices of chaudary and kanunjo of the pargana (lowest administrative unit), when theses post were created. These posts remained with the descendants of the original holders until the occupation of country by the British, when the office of was abolished.The Mughal Emperor Akbar conferred the proprietary rights on Marehra to Fateh Khan and Umar Khan, grandsons of the Khwaja. The town was divided into eleven muhallas or wards, the most noteworthy of which was the Kamboh muhalla.

Kamboh of Meerut District

The Muslim Kambohs of Meerut, in Uttar Pradesh have a tradition that they belonged to a distinguished Kamboh family of Ghazni which had come to India in early eleventh century in the invading army of Sulatn Mahmud of Ghazni (rule: 997 AD – 1030 AD). According to their own accounts the name “Kamboh” of the family is derived from that of their original home, Kamboja, the ancient name for Afghanistan. The Muslaman Kambohs of Meerut stated that that one of their ancestors, Hasan Mahmudi Kamboh was the Wazir (minister) of Sultan Mahmud Ghazni and came to India in first decade of eleventh century AD in the army of the Sultan. Their ancestors succeeded in capturing the city of Meerut from Raja Mai of Meerut Hassan Mahmudi Kamboh built the Jama Masjid in the city and around it stand buried the Kamboh heroes from Ghazni who fell in the attack on Meerut. The Masjid was later repaired in 16th century during the rule of Mughal Emperor Humayun. The early members of the Kamboh family built the Sangi Mahal which was later known as Permit House and another elegant palace known as Rangi Mahal– the remains of both these once-elegant palaces are still in existence.

Kamboh of Amroha and Moradabad

The Kambohs of Amroha all claim to come from Afghanistan. They traditionally resided in two mohallahs, the Saddu muhalla Kamboh who were Shia and those of Badshahi Chabutra wo were Sunni. The Saddu muhalla Kambohs claimed descent from from Hakim Imam-ud-din Khan, who arrived in Amroha the end of the eighteenth century from Meerut . The Sunni Kambohs claim descent from Muhtashim Khan, who came to Amroha at a somewhat earlier date. This family is related to the Sunni Kambohs of Moradabad, whose ancestor, Karim Bakhsh arrived in Moradabad from Dehli , during the rule of the Awadh Nawab Asaf-ud-daula. The Awadhi authorities appointed him chakladar . When Awadh rule was replaced by the British in the beginning of the 19th Century, he was made tehsildar. These Moradabad Kambohs were substantial landowners. In addition to the Muslim Kambohs, the old district of Moradabad (now Amroha, Moradabad and Sambhal) was also home to a large community of Hindu Kambohs.

Distribution of Muslim Kamboh in Uttar Pradesh by District According to 1891 Census of India

 

District Hindu Muslim
Saharanpur  3,271  689
Muzaffarnagar  920  8
Dehra Dun 290 5
Meerut 760 480
Bulandshahr  11
 Aligarh  38
 Agra  1
 Farrukhabad  67
 Mainpuri  2
 Etawah  2
Etah 437
 Bijnor  274  16
 Badaun  11
 Moradabad  308  294
Shahjahanpur  19
Kanpur  7
Fatehpur 62
Banda 17
Hamirpur 2
Allahabad  50
 Jhansi  24
 Jalaun  23
 Ghazipur  8
 Gorakhpur  6
 Basti  13
 Nainital  309
 Lucknow  9
 Sitapur  10
 Barabanki  2
 Bahraich  9
Total Population in UP 6,222 2,322

 

Description of Major Muslim Communities in India: Muslim Bhumihar / Kamsar Pathan

In this post, I look another major Indian Muslim community, found mainly in eastern Uttar Pradesh and parts of north western Bihar. There preferred self-designation now is Kamsari Pathan, although history they were known as Muslim Babhan, or Muslim Bhumihar. The Kamsari are a community of rural Muslims, who are descended from the Hindu Bhumihar community.

To start off with, I will briefly discuss the origin of the Bhumihar community, from whom the Kamsar trace their descent. The Bhumihars claim Brahmin status, and are also referred to as Bhumihar Brahmin. In Bihar, they are also known as Babhan and they have also been called Bhuinhar. The word Bhumihar is itself of relatively recent origin, first used in the records of United Provinces of Agra and Oudh in 1865. It derives from the word bhoomi (“land”), referring to the caste’s landowner status. The term Bhumihar Brahmin was adopted by the community in the late-19th century to emphasize their claim of belonging to the priestly Brahmin class. The alternate name “Babhan” has been described as a distorted colloquial term for “Brahmin. As with many castes in India, there are numerous myths regarding the origins of the Bhumihar community. One legend claims that their ancestors were Brahmins who were set up to take the place of the Kshatriyas slain by Parashurama but some non-Bhumihars have implied that they are the mixed-race offspring of Brahmin men and Kshatriya women. Other legends state that they are the offspring of a union between Rajput men and Brahmin women, or that they derive from Brahman-Buddhists who lost their high position in Hindu society.

With regards to Ghazipur District, the terms Bhumihar and Rajput are somewhat elastic, since the line of demarcation between these two communities is often extremely vague, both claiming a common origin in several instances, such as the case of the Kamsar Pathans. The Kamsar Pathans, who are found mainly in the Ghazipur District of eastern Uttar Pradesh. According to tribal traditions, they ancestor was a Kam Deo, a Sikarwar Rajput who came from the region of Agra. According to tribal traditions, Kam Deo served in force led by his brother Dham Deo, a leader of four thousand troops and fought alongside Rana Sanga of Mewar, who led a large Rajput alliance against the Mughal Emperor in the battle of Khanwa, a place near Agra in 1527. The Mughals were victorious and the Rajput army was scattered. Dham Deo and his elder brother Kam Deo came down to Ghazipur with their families and followers. The refuges are said to have settled in a territory between Karmnasha and Ganges in what is now Ghazipur district, Dham Deo and his followers settled in Gahmar, while Kam Deo settled in Zamania. Kam Deo’s descendants intermarried with other settled Bhumihars in the region, and founded the clan of Kinwar Bhumihars.
Subsequent to their arrival, both brothers and their followers entered into the service of Tikam Deo, the Cheru tribal chieftain of Birpur and eventually overthrew him, seizing his capital and occupying his estate At the time of the arrival of the refugees, the Cheru were said to be the rulers of most of Ghazipur. After a couple of generation, the community split into three main branches; after the founders Rajdhar Rai, Mukund Rai, and Pithaur Rai. Rajdhar Rai captured Birpur and one of his subdivisions settled in the Bara taluka of Zamania, and converted to Islam. There is however some dispute as to when the conversion to Islam. According to some traditions, the conversion occurred during the period of Lodhi rule over Ghazipur district, while others traditions point to a much later date during the rule of Sher Shah Suri. The first to convert to Islam was a Narhar Dev, later called Narhar Khan after his accepting of Islam.

The Kamsari are now mainly a community of peasant cultivators, but historically were in possession of most of the Bara of Ghazipur District. They speak Bhojpuri, although most also understand Urdu. The Kamsar now occupy a compact territory near the town of Bara, between the Ganges river and the Bihar state border. The most important settlement in Kamsar region of Dildarnagar Kamsar. Each of their settlement contains an informal caste council known as a panchayat, which enforces communal norms as well as resolving intra-community disputes. This region is also known as Kamsar-O-Bar, and the following villages Usia, Rakasaha, Tajpur Kurrah, Gorasara, Mania, Khajuri, Kusi, Bhaksi, Jaburna, Dewaitha, Fufuao, Bahuara, Saraila, Chitarkoni, Akhini come in the Bar sub region. Other then the Kamsar, there are several lineages of Muslim Bhumihar found in Munger and Muzaffarpur of Bihar, where they are called as Diwani Pathan.

Naipal and Wattu tribes

In this post, I will look at two communities of Punjabi Muslims, namely the Naipal and Wattu, that were found along the banks of the Sutlej, in what is now Okara, Kasur and Bahawalnagar districts in Pakistan, and Ferozepur in India. After the partition of Punjab in 1947, the Wattu and Naipal of Ferozepur immigrated to Pakistan. Both these tribes connect themselves to the Bhatti, and like them were largely pastoral until the arrival of the British in the 19th Century.

Naipal

I start with the very localized tribe of the Naipal, who were found entirely Ferozepur District. The Naipal clan get their name from Naipal, son of Bhuni, who belonged to the Bhatti tribe, were historically found on the Sutlej just north of the city Ferozepur. They came from Sirsa in the reign of Muhammad Shah (ruler 1719-1748), and once held the river valley as far down as that town, but were driven higher up by the Dogars, and in the Naipal in turn expelled the Gujars. Sometime during the middle of the 18th Century, the Naipals occupied the Makhu ilaqa, then probably a complete waste. It is said to have been named Makkah by a faqir, one Muhammad, who had been there, but its name was corrupted into Makhu. Like their neighbours, the Dogar, Gujjar and Wattu, they were largely pastoral.

By middle of the 18th Century, Mugha1 authority had collapsed in the Sutlej valley and the Naipals became independent until Jassa Singh, the Ahluwalia (1718-1783), chief of Kapurthala took possession of their territory around 1770, and established a thana at Makhu and created the ilaqa of that name. By the early 19th Century, Ahluwalia rule was replaced by the British. Groups of the Naipal began to immigrate to the Ahluwalia ruled Kapurthala State, establishing their settlement in 1857. The Naipal were almost independent under the Ahluwalia rulers, and to have paid a small rent in kind only when the kardar was strong enough to compel them to it, which has not often the case.

By the mid 19th Century, the Naipal were settled as farmers, and began to intermarry neighbouring Muslim Jat tribes such as the Sidhu. They have lost more of their Hindu origin than either the Dogars or Gujars, and in their marriage connections they follow the Muslim law, near blood relations being permitted to enter into the marriage. Most Naipals were owner cultivators, almost every member of the tribe holding land in ownership, and not cultivating it under a few tribal chiefs as tenants, like their neighbours the Dogars.
At the time of partition in 1947, the Naipal territory was allocated to India, leading to the migration of the entire tribe to Pakistan Punjab.


Wattoo

The Wattoo, sometines writen as Wattu, are one of the main Rajput tribes of the Sutlej valley, who are closely connected to the Bhatti. Their historic homeland lay adjacent to Bhattiana, the region that now forms parts of Hissar, Sirsa and Ferozpur. Like other Punjabi tribes, the Watto have several origin myths.

In the old Sirsa territory, modern day western Haryana, the Wattoo traditions refer to a Raja Junher, a descendant of the Bhatti Raja Salvahan of Sialkot, was settled in Bhatner, wher he had two sons Achal and Batera, who were.was settled in Bhatner. The descendants of Batera include the Sidhu and Barar Jats. The former again had two sons Jaipal and Raipal, of whom Jaipal was the ancestor of the Bhatti proper, and Raipal of the Wattoo. The Wattoo are said to have been converted to Islam by Baba Farid, during the rule of their chief Khiwa, who ruled at Haveli in Okara, and was succeeded by the famous Wattu chief, Lakhe Khan. Wattoo territory at the beginning of the 19th Century included lands on both banks of the Sutlej in the Sirsa district, and the adjoining parts of Montgomery and Bahawalpur state, from Baggehi 16 miles above Fazilka, to Phulahi 70 miles below it. Above them was the territory of the Dogars, below them the Joiya. In the late 18th Century, after the Chalissa famine, the Wattoo left what is now Okara and settled in the lands of Sirsa and Rania, which was ruled by Bhatti Nawabs. This migration occurred under the leadership Fazil Dalel Rana. Another branch moved into what is Bahawalnagar District. In the Sutlej valley, the Wattoo were the most important group of Hitharis. Other groups also began to move into the Ravi river valley clashing with both the Kharals and Bhattis of the Bhatiore.

Another Wattoo traditions makes them descendants of Rajah Salvahan son Pital, who quarrelled with hie brothers and went th Bhatner (now known as Hanumangarh) in Rajasthan. Twelve generatione later Adham, owing to a feud with tho Panwar Rajputs, immigrated into the
Punjab and earned his title of Wattoo by subduing the pride of that race.The word watt or vat has various meanings, and Wattoo very likely meens a borderer. The Wattoos have a number of clans (muhins), e.g. Ladhoka, Bazidke,
Salim-Shahi, etc, all named after a particular ancestor.The principal clans of the Wattoos in Bahawalpur are:

i) Salim-ke (I) Qaim-ke, (2) Amruke, (3) Bare-ke.
ii. Sahru, with a sub-sept Darweshke.
iii. Gaddhoke, (1) Ratte-ke, (2) Bithe-ke, (3) Dhaddi-ke, (4) Daddd-ke.
iv. Rahmanke
v. Malike
vi. Miana
viii Jasoke
ix. Ahloke

The Wattoo were pastoralist par excellence, and this shown by a quote by the colonial ethnographer W.E. Purser:

priding themselves upon their politeness and hospitality. They are of only moderate industry, profuse in expenditure on special occasions, indifferent to education and exceedingly fond of cattle

In Bahhwalpur they have a different origin, with the Wattoos originally coming from Jaisalmeer and settled in the Punjab, advancing as far as Batala, which according to this tradition they founded. They then dispersed along both banks of the Sutlej. Their conversion to Islam occurred during the rule of Firoz Shah Tughlak (1351 to 1388) after which period they were incorporated into the Sultanate of Delhi. With the collapse of Muslim rule, the Wattoo suffered greatly at the hands of Sidhu-Bar Sikhs to whom they remained tributary until Nawab Muhammad Bahawal Khan II (4 June 1772 – 13 August 1809) expelled the Sidhu-Barars from the Wattu territory and annexed it to Bahawalpur.

Prior to the partition of India, there were sizeable colonies in Fazilka in what is now Punjab, India and Sirsa in what is now Haryana. All of these communities migrated to Pakistan in 1947.

The Wattoo tribe is now found in the following districts; Okara District, Pakpattan District, Bahawalnagar District, Shekhupura District, Multan District, and Nankana Sahib District.

Description of Major Muslim Communities in India: Bhale Sultan

In this post, I stick with the state of Uttar Pradesh, and look at the Bhale Sultans, a community of Khanzadas found in Uttar Pradesh. There name is a combinationation of the Sanskrit, Bhala, a kind of arrow or spear and the Arabic word Sultan meaning lord. The Bhala in medieval India was a type of spear given only to army commanders, and possession signified leadership. So technically, any army commander was a Bhale Sultan, but the title is now restricted to a specific community of Hindu Thakurs and Muslim Khanzadas found in the Awadh region and Bulandshahr district of Uttar Pradesh. In fact, when we talk of the Bhale Sultan, we are really talking about two distinct communities, those of Bulandshahr and those of Awadh, each with their own origin myths. In the introduction to my article on the Ahbans, I discuss the exact meaning of the word Khanzada, and I ask the reader to look at that post.

Bhale Sultan of Bulandshahr

In Bulandshahr, the Bhale Sultans are found mainly in villages around the ancient town of Khurja. According to tribal traditions, there ancestor was Sidhrao Jai Sinh, a Solanki Rajput of Anhilwada Pattan in what is now Gujarat. A descendent of Sidhrao, Sarang Deo, a nephew of the then Solanki Raja of Gujarat, settled in the ancient city of Baran (now known as Bulandshahr), which was then part of a principality ruled by the Dor clan of Rajputs. These Solanki were then granted an estate of eight villages by Prithvi Raj Chauhan, as a reward for services rendered during the Mahoba war. Most of the country was inhabited by the Meo community, who Sarang Deo and his followers conquered. His grandson, Hamir Singh, obtained from Shah ab-ud-din Ghori the title of Bhala Sultan or lord of the lance.” From then on the clan became known as Bhale Sultan. Kirat Singh was seventh in descent from Hamir Singh, and his descendant, Khan Chand, seven generations later, converted to Islam during the rule of Khizr Khan and took the name of Malha Khan. His son, Lad Khan and his nephew, Narpat Singh, who divided the property between them, moved from their homes at Arniyan and Kakaur to Khurja during the reign of Akbar and received the office of Chaudhri. Over time, the Bhale Sultan, both the Muslim branch descended from Lad Khan and Hindu branch descended from Narpat Singh became effective rulers of Khurja. At their height, the Muslim branch owned forty-four villages and the Hindus of the same clan thirty-two villages and-a-half. However, with rise of Kheshgi Pathans of Khurja, the Bhale Sultan power declined, with further losses when the British conquered the Doab in the early 19th Century.

Bhale Sultan of Awadh

In Awadh, there are several communities of Bhale Sultans, each with their own origin myths. The most important are those communities found in Faizabad and Sultanpur.

Among the Bhala Sultan of Sultanpur, there is a tradition that four hundred years ago Rai Barar, son of Amba Rai, brother of the then Raja of Morarmau, commanded a troop of cavalry recruited entirely from the Bais clan in the service of the Mughals, and was deputed to exterminate the trouble sum Bhars (an indigenous community) in the Isauli Pargana in present day Sultanpur District. Having accomplished his task, he returned to Delhi and presented himself at the head of his troop before the Emperor, who, struck with their manly bearing, exclaimed, “Aao, Bhale Sultan” meaning “come, spear of the Sultan”. Palhan Deo, great grandson of Rai Barar, is said to have been converted to Islam during the rule of Sher Shah Suri. From this branch of the Bhale Sultan descended the taluqdar families of Deogaon, Mahona and Unchgaon. In addition, the more minor Muslim Bhale Sultan formed the main landowning group in the north-west corner of Sultanpur district, then forming the parganas of Isauli, Musafirkhana and Jagdispur

In Faizabad, the Bhale Sultan claim descent from Rao Mardan Sinh, who is said to be a Bais Rajput, of Dundiya Khera, who was a horse-dealer by profession. During a visit Gajanpur, in Isauli Pargana, of the Sultanpur District, where there was a fort of the Rajbhars, which the Thakur is said to have captured. His son, Rao Barar, entered the service of the Sultan of Delhi, and as he was a good horseman and clever spearman, he obtained the title of Bhale Sultan. One of his descendants, Baram Deo, obtained the title Khanzada from a Sultan of Delhi, and from that period his descendants have been called Khanzada.

While a little known tradition, in Rae Bareli claims that they were Ahirs who were raised to the rank of Rajputs by Tilok Chand, a legendary figure in Awadh history.

Distribution of Bhale Sultans by District According to 1891 Census of India

District Hindu Muslim
 Saharanpur  17  27
 Meerut  20
 Bulandshahr  6,370  4,790
 Agra  59  3
 Farrukhabad  9  6
 Mainpuri  36
 Badaun  11
 Shahjahanpur  9
 Pilibhit  19  4
 Kanpur  11  75
 Fatehpur  3
 Banda  1
 Allahabad  824 18
 Lalitpur  2  2
 Benaras  15  86
 Jaunpur  25  3
 Ghazipur  7
 Gorakhpur  35  64
 Basti  155  53
 Azamgarh  122  29
 Lucknow  17  283
 Unnao  5  38
 Rae Bareli  377  372
Sitapur 20 23
 Lakhimpur Kheri  3  108
 Faizabad  757  687
 Gonda  406  352
 Bahraich  108  271
 Sultanpur  8,016  4,607
 Partapgarh  49  17
 Barabanki  329  735
Total Population in UP  17,320  12,670

 

Population of Muslim Jat Clans of British Punjab According to the 1901 Census of India

Bellow is a breakdown of the larger Jat clans by population. I would also the reader to look at my posts Population of Muslim Jat Clans of British Punjab According to the 1891 Census of India/ and Major Muslim Jat clans, which gives a brief description of the main clans.

 

Tribe Population Distribution
Wariach 58,936 Gurdaspur, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Jhelum, Sialkot, Lahore and Amritsar
Cheema 39,358 Patiala, Lahore, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Gujranwala, Sialkot, Gujrat and Chenab Colony
Bajwa 27,609 Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Jallandhar and Patiala State
Chandhar/ Chadhar 27,422 Montgomery, Amritsar, Firuzpur, Lahore, Jhang, Muzaffargarh, Mianwali, Multan, Jhelum, Shahpur and Chenab Colony
Sandhu 25,786 Hissar, Ludhiana, Patiala, Montgomery, Gurdaspur, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Amritsar, Shahpur (Sargodha), Chenab Colony, Jhang and Multan
Tarar 25,606 Lahore, Gujrat, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Sargodha, Jhelum and Chenab Colony
Gill 19,894 Amritsar, Ludhiana, Jalandhar, Firuzpur, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Sialkot, and Chenab Colony
Virk 19,703 Gujranwala, Chenab Colony, Gujrat, Dera Ghazi Khan, Sialkot, Lahore and Amritsar
Ghumman 16,893 Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Sialkot, and Chenab Colony
Hanjra 15,892 Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Montgomery, Shahpur, Gujrat, Sialkot, and Chenab Colony
Bains 14,398 Ambala, Hoshiarpur, Gurdaspur, Sialkot, Gujrat, Jhelum, Rawalpindi, Shahpur, Chenab Colony, Multan and Dera Ghazi Khan
Bhutta 14,208 Shahpur, Jhelum, Mianwali, Multan and Chenab Colony
Goraya 14,076 Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Sialkot, and Chenab Colony
Bhatti 13,682 Shahpur, Jhelum, Mianwali and Chenab Colony
Langrial 12,960 Sialkot, Gujrat and Multan
Dhillon 12.913 Ambala, Hissar, Jalandhar, Kapurthala, Ludhiana, Amritsar, Lahore, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Sialkot Mianwali, and Chenab Colony
Sipra 12,558 Patiala, Montgomery, Gurdaspur, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Shahpur (Sargodha), Chenab Colony, Jhang, Multan and Bahawalpur
Heer 11,839 Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Montgomery, Shahpur, Mianwali, Gujrat, Sialkot, and Chenab Colony
Soomra / Samra 11,509 Mianwali, Muzaffargarh, Dera Ghazi Khan, Bahawalpur
Chatha 11,483 Patiala, Lahore, Gurdaspur, Gujranwala, Sialkot, Gujrat and Chenab Colony
Sahi 11,478 Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Patiala, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Gujrat, Jhelum and Sialkot
Sidhu 11,322 Hissar, Jallandhar, Ludhiana, Patiala, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Sialkot, Lahore, Gujranwala, Gujrat and Chenab Colony
Parhar 11,099 Shahpur, Bahawalpur, Muzaffargarh and Dera Ghazi Khan
Thaheem 11,023 Multan, Bahawalpur, Muzaffargarh and Dera Ghazi Khan
Kahlon 10,809 Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Kapurthala, Jalandhar and Chenab Colony
Langah 10,808 Shahpur, Muzaffargarh, Dera Ghazi Khan, Mianwali, Multan and Bahawalpur
Harral 10,599 Gujranwala, Shahpur, Mianwali, Gujrat, Jhang, and Chenab Colony
Chachar 10,079 Bahawalpur and Dera Ghazi Khan
Randhawa 9,617 Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Patiala, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Gujranwala and Sialkot
Chhina 8,492 Lahore, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Gujranwala, Sialkot, Gujrat, Rawalpindi, Mianwali, Chenab Colony and Dera Ghazi Khan
Panwar or Puar 7,900 Bahawalpur and Firuzpur
Chelar 7,529 Bahawalpur
Babbar 6,657 Multan, Dera Ghazi Khan and Muzaffargarh
Kang 6,580 Patiala, Lahore, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Gujranwala, Sialkot, Gujrat, Multan, Muzaffargarh and Chenab Colony
Sandhel 6,215 Dera Ghazi Khan, Mianwali, Muzaffargarh, Bahawalpur
Maan 5,939 Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Patiala, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Gujranwala, Sialkot and Chenab Colony
Aulakh 5,838 Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Amritsar, and Jallandhar
Sarai 5,746 Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Amritsar, Ludhiana, Ambala and Jallandhar
Janjua 5,394 Mianwali, Muzaffargarh and Dera Ghazi Khan
Jodhra 5,157 Attock
Mangat 5000 Patiala, Ludhiana, Gujrat, Gujranwala and Sialkot
Autrah 4,962 Multan, Mianwali and Muzaffargarh
Ghallu 4.906 Multan, Muzaffargarh and Bahawalpur
Buttar 4,923 Dera Ghazi Khan, Ludhiana, Firuzpur, Lahore, Gurdaspur, Gujranwala and Sialkot
Dhariwal 4,884 Ambala, Hissar, Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Amritsar, Lahore, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Sialkot and Chenab Colony
Chahal 4,466 Ambala, Ludhiana, Firuzpur, Amritsar, Lahore, Gurdaspur, Gujranwala, Sialkot and Chenab Colony
Sahu 4,294 Multan and Muzaffargarh
Dosanjh 4,198 Kapurthala and Jalandhar
Sial 4,169 Rawalpindi and Mianwali
Jakhar 4,165 Hissar, Firuzpur, Bahawalpur, Mianwali, Montgomery, and Multan
Lak 3,971 Shahpur, Jhang, Chenab Colony, Muzaffargarh and Dera Ghazi Khan
Bhullar 3,905 Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Jalandhar and Lahore
Naij 3,894 Bahawalpur
Bohar 3,833 Bahawalpur and Dera Ghazi Khan
Khaki 3,801 Multan, Muzaffargarh and Bahawalpur
Khokhar 3,735 Gujranwala
Malana 3,609 Muzaffargarh and Dera Ghazi Khan
Dahya 3,602 Ambala, Bahawalpur, Hissar, Karnal, Rohtak and Delhi
Mohana 3,591 Dera Ghazi Khan
Deo / Dev 3,549 Ludhiana, Patiala, Amritsar, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Mianwali and Chenab Colony
Lodike 3,269 Gujranwala
Malak 3,264 Bahawalpur
Atwal 3,200 Jalandhar and Amritsar
Lali 3,137 Shahpur and Jhang
Samma 3,084 Bahawalpur
Kharal 3,046 Gujranwala
Kalru 2,956 Multan and Muzaffargarh
Kanyal 2,944 Rawalpindi and Jhelum
Khera or Khaira 2,942 Lahore, Amritsar and Sialkot
Sahotra 2,805 Hoshiarpur, Jalandhar and Chenab Colony
Maitla 2,765 Dera Ghazi Khan and Multan
Phor 2,738 Multan and Dera Ghazi Khan
Lakaul 2,675 Muzaffargarh and Dera Ghazi Khan
Dhotar 2,545 Gujranwala and Gujrat
Gondal 2,508 Jhelum, Rawalpindi and Chenab Colony
Bassi 2,449 Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Sohal 2,383 Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Patiala, Amritsar, Gurdaspur and Sialkot
Sangi 2,338 Dera Ghazi Khan, Bahawalpur, Firuzpur and Kapurthala
Naul 2,311 Jhang
Aura 2,329 Rawalpindi
Kalasra 2,284 Mianwali and Muzaffargarh
Bahiniwal / Wahiniwal 2,227 Montgomery, Hissar, Rohtak and Firuzpur
Daha 2,222 Muzaffargarh, Multan and Bahawalpur
Dhamial 2,209 Rawalpindi and Jhelum
Johal 2,199 Amritsar, Kapurthala, Jalandhar and Chenab Colony
Nonari 2,086 Multan, Muzaffargarh, Montgomery and Bahawalpur
Channar 1,959 Multan and Bahawalpur
Lang 1,873 Multan
Mahil 1,861 Ambala, Hoshiarpur and Amritsar
Nanwai 1,833 Bahawalpur
Uttera 1,817 Multan and Bahawalpur
Kalial 1,791 Rawalpindi
Sudhan 1,765 Rawalpindi
Pannun 1,752 Amritsar, Lahore, Gujranwala, Sialkot and Chenab Colony
Chhajra 1,648 Dera Ghazi Khan
Barra 1,597 Dera Ghazi Khan
Bhachar 1,588 Mianwali
Jakhlan 1,584 Dera Ghazi Khan
Kalwar 1,582 Bahawalpur
Khatreel 1,578 Rawalpindi
Rehan 1,573 Jhang and Shahpur
Hans 1,542 Multan, Muzaffargarh and Montgomery
Waseer 1,513 Chenab Colony
Jhammat 1,508 Mianwali and Jhelum
Turk 1,499 Mianwali
Kohawer 1,487 Mianwali
Kahka 1,453 Bahawalpur
Gandhi 1,452 Mianwali
Bal 1,439 Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Lahore, Jalandhar and Ludhiana
Marral or Marhal 1,434 Karnal, Patiala and Jhang
Sahmal 1,417 Jhang and Chenab Colony
Tulla 1,403 Sargodha
Asar 1,400 Mianwali
Sanda 1,398 Bahawalpur and Mianwali
Gilotar 1,394 Jhang
Dumra 1,357 Mianwali and Dera Ghazi Khan
Turkhel 1,344 Mianwali
Sekhon 1,335 Gujranwala
Kahu 1,331 Chenab Colony
Dahar / Dahiri 1,327 Bahawalpur
Kalu 1,301 Mianwali
Kalu 1,301 Mianwali
Jhullan 1,285 Bahawalpur
Lohanch 1,275 Mianwali and Muzaffargarh
Wagha 1,273 Chenab Colony
Rawn 1,213 Multan
Bhidwal 1,207 Mianwali
Hanbi 1,207 Dera Ghazi Khan
Bhangu 1,186 Amritsar, Gurdaspur and Chenab Colony
Khandoa 1,168 Mianwali
Chaudhari 1,162 Bahawalpur
Ser 1,144 Mianwali
Uttra 1,145 Mianwali
Kalyar 1,123 Multan
Rawn 1,212 Multan
Talokar 1,096 Mianwali
Jhawari 1,092 Shahpur
Mahe 1,050 Multan
Ganja 1,047 Bahawalpur
Tonwar / Tomar 1,038 Bahawalpur
Dhindsa 1,032 Jalandhar, Kapurthala, Ludhiana, Amritsar, Lahore, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Sialkot, and Chenab Colony
Kachela 1,010 Multan
Samtia 1,007 Mianwali
Joiya 993 Bahawalpur, Firuzpur and Mianwali
Duran 977 Bahawalpur
Panjootha 966 Shahpur
Grewal 965 Ludhiana
Dhudhi 965 Mianwali
Dhandla 929 Dera Ghazi Khan
Bhaya 923 Bahawalpur
Kajla 922 Dera Ghazi Khan
Hidan 915 Jhang
Dab 908 Jhang
Bar 899 Chenab Colony
Minhas 824 Jhelum
Dakah 823 Bahawalpur
Gorchhar 807 Mianwali
Shajra 796 Multan and Bahawlpur
Bhumla 793 Mianwali
Lar 778 Multan and Muzaffargarh
Mahaar 773 Dera Ghazi Khan and Bahawalpur
Kanera 765 Dera Ghazi Khan
Wahla 756 Chenab Colony
Kalhora 725 Bahawalpur
Panuhan 723 Multan
Jora 718 Shahpur
Jappa 706 Jhang
Jatal 703 Rawalpindi
Kolar 661 Bahawalpur
Burana 657 Shahpur
Khichi 651 Bahawalpur
Mahesar 648 Dera Ghazi Khan and Bahawalpur
Baghial 647 Rawalpindi
Dhandhu 643 Bahawalpur
Khombra 637 Bahawalpur
Dhamtal 635 Rawalpindi
Manela 628 Bahawalpur
Kanju 626 Multan
Raad 618 Multan
Khatti 612 Dera Ghazi Khan
Butta 610 Chenab Colony
Rajoke 607 Chenab Colony
Mial or Miyal 599 Rawalpindi
Maghial 596 Rawalpindi
Bhakral 585 Jhelum
Pawania 581 Karnal, Hissar and Firuzpur
Lodhra 580 Multan
Pawania 576 Hissar, Karnal and Rohtak
Bedha 572 Mianwali
Masson 563 Bahawalpur
Nissowana 560 Shahpur and Jhang
Ghatwala or Malik 556 Hissar, Karnal, Rohtak and Delhi
Marath 549 Shahpur
Sanghera 544 Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Basra 540 Gurdaspur and Sialkot
Thathaal 534 Rawalpindi, Jhelum and Sialkot
Murali 526 Jhang
Khal 512 Bahawalpur
Bipar 508 Bahawalpur
Dharal 499 Mianwali
Burara 498 Bahawalpur
Kohadar 496 Bahawalpur
Badhan 494 Rawalpindi, Jhelum and Sialkot
Magrial 486 Rawalpindi
Chan 479 Muzaffargarh
Bhutt 475 Bahawalpur
Makwal 473 Dera Ghazi Khan and Bahawalpur
Sutera 468 Bahawalpur
Sehwag 462 Karnal and Rohtak
Dasa 459 Bahawalpur
Nain 456 Karnal, Rohtak and Delhi
Jaam 448 Bahawalpur
Sagoo 445 Shahpur (Sargodha)
Rak 435 Multan
Khalne 412 Bahawalpur
Wattu 411 Chenab Colony
Sandi 410 Mianwali
Jhar 402 Dera Ghazi Khan
Deshwal / Deswal 400 Hissar, Gurgaon, Karnal, Rohtak and Delhi
Khar 389 Muzaffargarh
Jaj 382 Chenab Colony
Noon 377 Multan
Dhal 374 Shahpur
Mohal 373 Montgomery and Bahawalpur
Budhwana 366 Mianwali
Rathi 363 Karnal, Rohtak and Delhi
Chauhan 361 Lahore and Amritsar
Gahora 352 Bahawalpur
Gaun 349 Multan
Manais 332 Montgomery
Sahgra 331 Multan
Unnar 329 Bahawalpur
Toor 329 Patiala State
Gangal 325 Rawalpindi
Kathia 320 Montgomery
Matyal 314 Rawalpindi
Athangal 308 Multan
Sarah 300 Firuzpur,
Dona 290 Multan
Kont 288 Bahawalpur
Siroha 281 Rohtak
Mahota 277 Multan
Bucha 275 Multan
Bhagiara 270 Rawalpindi
Gawanis 262 Chenab Colony
Wawana 258 Mianwali
Kalasan 252 Jhang
Jhak 246 Bahawalpur
Hurgan 236 Shahpur
Chauhan-Hamshira 233 Bahawalpur
Tama 231 Jhelum
Hundal 230 Amritsar and Chenab Colony
Mangral 226 Rawalpindi
Hattial 222 Rawalpindi
Suddle 221 Multan
Khehi 219 Bahawalpur
Kudhan 216 Jhang
Kassar 216 Jhelum
Rawana 215 Mianwali
Salhal 215 Rawalpindi
Mangon 204 Jhang
Kasra 204 Jhang
Bhindar 194 Gujranwala
Harrial 194 Rawalpindi
Nehon 184 Bahawalpur
Atar Khel 181 Mianwali
Waghora 173 Mianwali
Godara 170 Karnal, Rohtak and Delhi
Phira 170 Rawalpindi
Pala Khel 169 Mianwali
Balani 167 Chenab Colony
Pandah 165 Multan
Des 158 Mianwali
Markhand 155 Bahawalpur
Hannial 155 Rawalpindi
Mundra 150 Rawalpindi
Targar 150 Jhang
Matmal 149 Jhang
Dagur 148 Gurgaon, Rohtak and Delhi
Kalu Khel 147 Mianwali
Lidhar 141 Amritsar and Chenab Colony
Gallat 138 Rohtak
Phal 135 Rawalpindi
Walana 132 Rawalpindi
Sian 131 Chenab Colony
Birkan 130 Mianwali
Chal 123 Multan
Sangah 123 Bahawalpur
Tatla 117 Chenab Colony
Sahrawat 108 Karnal, Rohtak and Gurgaon
Hasnana 104 Jhang
Khalis 102 Rawalpindi
Narwal 101 Karnal
Dalal 97 Hissar, Gurgaon, Rohtak and Delhi
Bandecha 90 Lahore
Chandhran 76 Multan
Kookara 55 Jhang
Ahlawat 48 Rohtak
Baidwan 47 Ambala
Rohal 44 Karnal and Rohtak
Dhankar 42 Delhi and Rohtak
Sheoran 37 Hissar and Karnal
Salakhlan 25 Rohtak
Gulia 17 Rohtak and Delhi
Sethi 14 Ludhiana
Boparai 13 Ludhiana
Aujla Malerkotla 11
Kadian 11 Karnal

 

Population of Muslim Jat Clans of British Punjab According to the 1911 Census of India

Bellow is a breakdown of the larger Jat clans by population. I would also the reader to look at my post Major Muslim Jat clans, which gives a brief description of the main clans.

 

Tribe Population Distribution
Wariach 66,392 Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh, Gujrat, Sialkot, Gurdaspur, Gujranwala, Lahore, Sargodha, Amritsar, Ludhiana, Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Gondal 62,320 Jhang, Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh, Gujrat, Jhelum, Lahore, Sargodha and Rawalpindi
Cheema 37,076 Multam, Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh, Gujrat, Gujranwala, Sialkot, Lahore, Sargodha, Amritsar, Ludhiana, Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Bhatti 35,289 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan, Dera Ghazi Khan, Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh, Ambala, Lahore, Sahiwal / Okara, Jhelum, Mianwali / Bhakkar, Sargodha, Ludhiana, Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Khokhar 33,032 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan, Dera Ghazi Khan, Jhang, Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh, Gujranwala, Sahiwal, Okara, Lahore and Hissar
Sandhu 32,632 Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh,Gujrat, Sialkot, Gurdaspur, Gujranwala, Lahore, Sargo dha, Amritsar, Ludhiana, Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Kharal 24,702 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan, Jhang, Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh, Sahiwal / Okara, Lahore, Mianwali / Bhakkar, Gujranwala, Sargodha
Bajwa 23,501 Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh, Gujranwala, Sialkot, Gurdaspur, Sargodha, Lahore, Amritsar, Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Gill 22,861 Multan, Jhang, Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh, Sialkot, Gujtanwala, Lahore, Gurdaspur, Amritsar, Ludhiana, Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Tarar 22,351 Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh,Lahore, Gujrat, Gujranwala, Jhelum, Sialkot and Sargodha
Sial 21,251 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan, Dera Ghazi Khan, Jhang, Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh,Sahiwal / Okara / Pakpattan, Gujrat, Jhelum, Mianwali / Bhakkar, Lahore and Rawalpindi
Chadhar/Chandher 19,396 Multan, Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan, Jhang, Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh, Sahiwal / Okara / Pakpattan, Gujrat, Jhelum, Mianwali / Bhakkar, Muzaffargarh, Sialkot, Sargodha, Lahore, Amritsar, and Firuzpur
Bhutta 17,306 Multan, Dera Ghazi Khan, Muzaffargarh, Mianwali / Bhakkar, Jhelum, Sargodha
Virk 16,153 Multan, Dera Ghazi Khan, Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh,Sialkot, Gurdaspur, Gujrat, Gujranwala, Lahore, Sargodha, Amritsar, Ludhiana, and Jalandhar
Ghumman 13,826 Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh, Sialkot, Gurdaspur, Gujrat, Gujranwala, Lahore, Sargodha, Amritsar, Ludhiana, Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Hanjra 12,844 Jhang, Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh, Sialkot, Gurdaspur, Gujrat, Gujranwala, Sargodha, Lahore, Amritsar, Ludhiana, Jalandhar
Joiya 12,044 Dera Ghazi Khan, Jhang, Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh, Firuzpur, Sahiwal /Okara, Lahore, Sargodha, Mianwali / Bhakkar
Kahlon 11,942 Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Lahore, Gurdaspur Amritsar, and Jalandhar
Chachar 11,783 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan, Dera Ghazi Khan and Multan
Dhillon 11,561 Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh, Ambala, Ludhiana,Lahore, Gujrat, Gujranwala, Jalandhar, Kapurthala and Sialkot
Bains /Waince 11,487 Multan, Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan, Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh, Sialkot, Gurdaspur, Gujrat, Mianwali / Bhakkar, Jhelum, Sargodha, Ambala, Ludhiana, Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Chhina 10,424 Dera Ghazi Khan, Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh,Gujranwala, Sialkot, Lahore, Sargodha, Mianwali / Bhakkar,Rawalpindi, Gurdaspur, Amritsar, and Jalandhar
Thaheem 10,088 Dera Ghazi Khan, Muzaffargarh, Sargodha, Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan and Multan
Khichi 10,067 Jhang, Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh, Sahiwal / Okara / Pakpattan, Sargodha and Multan
Harral 9,553 Jhang, Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh, Jhelum, Sargodha and Gujranwala
Randhawa 9,261 Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh, Sialkot, Gurdaspur, Gujranwala, Lahore, Amritsar, Ludhiana, Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Goraya 8,707 Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh, Gujranwala, Sialkot, Sargodha, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Amritsar, Ludhiana, and Jalandhar
Panwar or Puar 8,568 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan, Dera Ghazi Khan
Nonari 8,236 Jhang, Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh,Sahiwal / Okara / Pakpattan, Muzaffargarh / Layyah and Multan
Sahi 7,947 Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Mianwali / Bhakkar, Lahore, Gujrat, Amritsar, Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Sidhu 7,856 Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh, Sialkot, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Amritsar, Ludhiana, Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Langah 7,766 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan, Dera Ghazi Khan, Muzaffargarh, Sargodha, Mianwali / Bhakkar and Multan
Soomra 7,742 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan, Dera Ghazi Khan, Muzaffargarh, Mianwali and Multan
Thathaal 7,550 Gujrat, Sialkot, Jhelum, Gurdaspur and Rawalpindi
Ranjha 7,536 Sargodha
Bulla 6,691 Multan
Babbar 6,657 Dera Ghazi Khan, Muzaffargarh
Noon 6,493 Multan, Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan, Jhang, and Sargodha – most Noon in Sargodha declared themselves to be Rajput
Awan 6,232 Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh, Sialkot, Gurdaspur and Lahore
Dhamial 6,232 Jhelum and Rawalpindi
Daha 6,041 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan, Dera Ghazi Khan, Muzaffargarh
Heer 6,013 Dera Ghazi Khan, Jhang, Sialkot, Lahore, Gujrat, Mianwali / Bhakkar, Sargodha, Amritsar, Ludhiana, Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Chatha 5,963 Multan, Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh, Gujranwala, Sialkot, Muzaffargarh, Lahore, Amritsar, Ludhiana, Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Sipra 5,886 Jhang, Faisalabad, Gujrat, Gujranwala and Multan
Lak 5,803 Dera Ghazi Khan, Jhang, Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh, Sargodha
Mekan 5,435 Sargodha
Ghallu 5,313 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan, Muzaffargarh, Mianwali
Bohar 5,308 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan,Dera Ghazi Khan
Bab 5,257 Dera Ghazi Khan
Parhar 5,118 Dera Ghazi Khan, Muzaffargah, Jhang, Bhakkar, Sargodha and Multan
Bassi 5,090 Kapurthala and Jalandhar
Maan 4,955 Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh, Gurdaspur, Gujranwala, Lahore, Hissar, Ludhiana, Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Dhudhi 4,903 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan, Jhang, Sahiwal / Okara / Pakpattan, Jhelum, Mianwali / Bhakkar, Sargodha
Langrial 4,489 Multan, Rawalpindi, Sialkot and Gujrat
Mahra 4,810 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan, Dera Ghazi Khan, Jhang and Multan
Bangial 4,798 Jhelum, Rawalpindi, Sialkot and Gujrat
Dhariwal 4,449 Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh, Ambala, Amritsar, Gujranwala, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Ludhiana, Sialkot Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Naich 4,379 Dera Ghazi Khan
Manjotha 4,348 Dera Ghazi Khan
Mahaar 4,277 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan,Sahiwal / Okara / Pakpattan
Aulakh 4,245 Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh, Gujranwala, Sialkot, Gurdaspur, Mianwali, Lahore, Amritsar, Ludhiana, Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Malak 4,042 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Basra 4,041 Sialkot, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Amritsar, Ludhiana, Jalandhar
Jhammat 4,030 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan, Mianwali / Bhakkar, Jhelum
Chahal 4,024 Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh, Gujranwala, Ambala, Lahore, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Ludhiana, Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Khera or Khaira 3,958 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan, Dera Ghazi Khan, Muzaffargarh, Faisalabad, Sialkot, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Amritsar, Ludhiana, Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Chauhan 3,910 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan, Dera Ghazi Khan, Faisalabad, Sahiwal / Okara / Pakpattan, Gujrat, Lahore and Patiala State
Kang 3,887 Ambala, Amritsar, Gujrat, Dera Ghazi Khan, Muzaffargarh / Layyah, Ludhiana, Jalandhar, Kapurthala and Sialkot
Sahu 3,864 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan, Faisalabad, Sahiwal / Okara / Pakpattan, Muzaffargarh
Maij 3,786 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Mallana 3,771 Dera Ghazi Khan, Muzaffargarh, Mianwali
Sandhila 4,566 Dera Ghazi Khan, Muzaffargarh, Mianwali and Multan
Chaughata 3,728 Multan and Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Kanyal 3,527 Mianwali / Bhakkar, Jhelum and Rawalpindi
Kalyal 3,168 Jhelum and Rawalpindi
Bilar 3,147 Multan
Buttar 3,067 Dera Ghazi Khan, Gujranwala, Sialkot, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Amritsar, Ludhiana, Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Sahotra 3,035 Dera Ghazi Khan, Muzaffargarh, Ambala, Ludhiana, Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Targar 3,011 Mianwali
Mangat 2,962 Ambala, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Ludhiana, Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Sujal 2,954 Sargodha
Janjua 2,876 Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh, Mianwali / Bhakkar,Muzaffargarh / Layyah, Hoshiarpur and Patiala State – most Janjua declared themselves as Rajputs
Sarai 2,827 Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Amritsar, Ludhiana, Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Lang 2,715 Multan
Lakaul 2,675 Dera Ghazi Khan, Muzaffargarh
Lodike 2,675 Gujranwala
Rawn 2,616 Multan
Hans 2,573 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan, Muzaffargarh, Sahiwal / Okara / Pakpattan
Khak 3,161 Multan, Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan, Dera Ghazi Khan, Sialkot, and Gurdaspur
Bhullar 2,544 Sialkot, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Amritsar, Ludhiana, Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Kachela 2,517 Dera Ghazi Khan and Multan
Wehi 2,509 Multan
Arar 2,478 Sahiwal / Okara / Pakpattan, Mianwali / Bhakkar
Dosanjh 2,473 Ludhiana, Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Atwal 2,430 Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh, Ambala, Ludhiana, Gurdaspur Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Khakhi 2,418 Muzaffargarh and Multan
Kallu 2,403 Mianwali / Bhakkar, Sialkot, and Gurdaspur
Uttera 2,392 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan and Lodhran
Jajularu 2,379 Multan
Asar 2,352 Mianwali
Lali 2,324 Jhang, Sargodha
Dhaku 2,295 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan,Sahiwal / Okara / Pakpattan, Sargodha
Lurka 2,288 Faisalabad
Waseer 2,266 Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh and Multan
Auler Khel 2,244 Mianwali
Rajoke 2,243 Jhang, Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh
Dhal 2,210 Mianwali / Bhakkar, Sargodha
Arain 2,192 Multan
Bhakral 2,147 Jhelum
Chapal 2,120 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Jakhar 2,275 Multan, Sahiwal / Okara / Pakpattan, Mianwali/ Bhakkar, Firuzpur, and Hissar
Lona 2,062 Jhang, Faisalabad
Sambar 2,030 Dera Ghazi Khan
Khatril 2,004 Rawalpindi
Sohal 1,985 Sialkot, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Sargodha, Amritsar, Ludhiana, Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Deo 1,961 Faisalabad, Gujranwala, Sialkot, Lahore, Amritsar, Ludhiana, Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Barra 1,927 Dera Ghazi Khan
Aulara 1,915 Mianwali
Pannun 1,914 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan, Sialkot, Gurdaspur, Gujranwala, Lahore, Amritsar, Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Rehan 1,880 Sargodha
Khar 1,853 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan, Mianwali, Bhakkar/Layyah
Nanwa 1,833 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Nagyal 1,830 Jhelum
Bhasa 1,829 Multan
Raya 1,790 Jhelum
Bhachar 1,719 Mianwali
Marral 1,705 Jhang,Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Changar 1,704 Faisalabad and Dera Ghazi Khan
Wattu 1,695 Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh
Tonwar / Tomar 1,691 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan – outside Bahawalpur almost all the Tonwar declared themselves as Rajput
Kalsan 1,690 Jhang, Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh, Sahiwal / Okara / Pakpattan
Wahla 1,688 Faisalabad, Sialkot, and Gurdaspur
Panwat 1,676 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Jammun 1,657 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Malil 1,633 Sahiwal / Okara / Pakpattan
Larsan 1,609 Multan
Jajalani 1,571 Dera Ghazi Khan
Makwal 1,564 Dera Ghazi Khan, Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Bhamb 1,552 Sargodha
Chhajra 1,507 Mianwali and Dera Ghazi Khan
Gilotar 1,497 Jhang
Kalru 1,488 Muzaffargarh
Mahun 1,471 Jhang
Jora 1,457 Mianwali / Bhakkar, Sargodha
Dahya 1,391 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan, Hissar, Ambala – most Dahya declared themselves as Rajputs
Kundi 1,338 Mianwali
Wasli 1,327 Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh and Multan
Tulla 1,311 Sargodha
Dahar or Dahiri 1,307 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Dakhna 1,303 Dera Ghazi Khan
Kalasra 1,281 Muzaffargarh
Talokar 1,274 Mianwali
Kalwar 1,271 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan – outside Bahawalpur most Kalwar registered themselves as a seperate caste
Gujar 1,265 Jhang
Mekan 1,229 Jhelum
Bhidwal 1,295 Mianwali
Jhullan 1,285 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Parohe 1,253 Multan
Nourangi 1,247 Multan
Bahiniwal 1,225 Hissar, Karnal and Rohtak
Dawana 1,210 Multan
Chani 1,204 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan, Dera Ghazi Khan
Khatarmal 1,184 Jhelum
Bagwar 1,179 Multan
Ghagar 1,177 Multan
Mahla 1,160 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Sangi 1,159 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Matyal 1,147 Jhelum
Khinger 1,146 Jhelum
Tatri 1,122 Sargodha
Johal 1,115 Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh, Gurdaspur, Ludhiana, Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Aheer 1,101 Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh, Sargodha
Jhawari 1,092 Sargodha
Sadraj 1,091 Multan
Bar 1,084 Faisalabad
Dhar 1,074 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Samma 1,072 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Kanera 1,071 Dera Ghazi Khan, Mianwali
Aishiani 1,058 Dera Ghazi Khan
Khat 1,055 Sargodha
Gorchhi 1,054 Mianwali
Gangal 1,049 Jhelum
Gauja 1,047 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Kudhan 1,045 Jhang
Pansota 1,041 Faisalabad
Dara 1,040 Multan
Kalhora 1,031 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Thabal 1,019 Jhang
Naul 1,630 Jhang and Multan
Sahmal 994 Jhang
Lodhra 985 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Sandi 981 Mianwali
Duran 977 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Chachakar 974 Multan
Sadhari 974 Multan
Grewal 962 Ludhiana
Shakhani 961 Dera Ghazi Khan
Sandal 960 Multan
Chozan 958 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Maru 956 Jhang
Dhandla 949 Dera Ghazi Khan
Chimar 947 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Samitah 943 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Kamoka 943 Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh
Burana 935 Sargodha
Maho 934 Multan
Siana 933 Multan
Chanal 919 Multan
Hidan 914 Jhang
Katwal 912 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Batwani 895 Dera Ghazi Khan
Samdana 895 Dera Ghazi Khan
Kakrial 894 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Pumma 893 Mianwali
Samra 880 Sialkot, Gurdaspur, Gujranwala, Lahore, Amritsar, Ludhiana, Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Phor 867 Dera Ghazi Khan
Kalera 855 Sargodha
Dhandu 844 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Autrah 843 Muzaffargarh
Domra 822 Dera Ghazi Khan
Pattiwala 816 Multan
Awrah 814 Jhang
Badhan 813 Gujrat, Ambala and Karnal
Ghatwala also known as Malik 808 Karnal and Rohtak
Basar 807 Multan
Baghoor 807 Sargodha
Phaphra 802 Jhelum
Sattar 801 Jhang
Koral 794 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Jaam 788 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Gujjral 788 Jhelum
Darakhe 785 Dera Ghazi Khan
Wahiniwal 782 Faisalabad
Lar 778 Muzaffargarh
Unu 777 Mianwali
Maitla 776 Dera Ghazi Khan
Chavan 775 Multan
Hanbi 769 Dera Ghazi Khan
Langra 766 Multan
Sailigar 757 Multan
Natt 755 Sialkot, and Gurdaspur
Parkar 753 Multan
Bandechha 750 Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh, Amritsar
Dahral 738 Sargodha
Khanda 734 Jhelum
Hujjan 733 Dera Ghazi Khan
Atral 733 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Bhatia 733 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Hundal 725 Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh, Amritsar
Khaloti 720 Dera Ghazi Khan
Otrai 718 Dera Ghazi Khan
Kalyar 715 Sargodha
Sagoo 715 Sargodha
Jatal 710 Jhelum
Ghogha 710 Jhelum
Hatiar 691 Sargodha
Hansi 691 Mianwali
Dangar 689 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Rongia 689 Multan
Kamboh 679 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan – outside Bahawalpur, almost all Kamboh registered themselves as a separate caste
Jhandir 679 Sahiwal /Okara / Pakpattan
Kanwan 678 Jhang
Suddle 674 Multan
Shaikha 674 Multan
Mahran 673 Multan
Mohana 663 Dera Ghazi Khan
Makkal 662 Mianwali
Asran 662 Mianwali
Mahesar 648 Dera Ghazi Khan
Mangil 656 Dera Ghazi Khan
Sangra 653 Mianwali
Khoti 646 Jhelum
Dhol 638 Dera Ghazi Khan
Bhadro 638 Sahiwal / Okara / Pakpattan
Kaloke 638 Rawalpindi
Khombra 637 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Ganda 637 Rawalpindi
Ghani 628 Dera Ghazi Khan
Manela 628 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Dhindsa 627 Sialkot, Lahore, Amritsar, Ludhiana, Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Bhangu 625 Gujranwala, Sialkot, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Amritsar, Ludhiana, Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Jandral 618 Jhelum
Ruk 618 Multan
Tama 617 Jhelum
Lidhar 614 Sialkot, Gurdaspur and Lahore
Khatti 612 Dera Ghazi Khan
Aura 610 Rawalpindi
Chandram 608 Multan
Bagar 602 Multan
Sapral 600 Sahiwal / Okara / Pakpattan
Kalhar 600 Mianwali
Samachi 599 Multan
Panjootha 596 Sargodha
Ghorhawal 591 Mianwali
Bhander 589 Sargodha
Chahura 587 Mianwali
Bagril 586 Gujrat
Athar 581 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Pukhowara 581 Multan
Hariar 579 Jhelum
Lapra 579 Multan
Brakha 579 Sargodha
Charal 578 Multan
Rayar 578 Sialkot, and Gurdaspur
Sandrana 577 Sargodha
Serwal 572 Jhelum
Jangal 572 Jhelum
Kajla 558 Dera Ghazi Khan
Kande 557 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Kabru 554 Dera Ghazi Khan
Jarola 550 Sargodha
Samri 549 Multan
Marath 548 Sargodha
Joota 544 Jhelum
Saand 544 Mianwali
Hindan 541 Rawalpindi
Kathal 538 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Jandi 538 Sialkot, and Gurdaspur
Masson 537 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Jauson 531 Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh
Malhan 529 Dera Ghazi Khan
Kalia 525 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Bir 524 Multan
Meo 524 Dera Ghazi Khan – the relation of the Meo Jat of Dera Ghazi Khan and the Meo caste in Gurgaon, Alwar and Bharatpur is unclear. The Meo Jat claim an Arab origin
Samtia 524 Mianwali
Sansi 522 Gujranwala and Lahore
Dhamtal 520 Rawalpindi
Chhaj 510 Faisalabad
Bipar 508 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Chawali 506 Bahawalpur / Rahim Yar Khan
Khinge 506 Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh
Nissowana 505 Sargodha
Bhawan 503 Sargodha
Barar 501 Dera Ghazi Khan
Mahi 498 Multan
Kohawer 496 Mianwali
Gadri 490 Sialkot and Gurdaspur
Minhas 457 Jhelum
Sanghera 418 Ambala, Ludhiana, Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Chuna 415 Sialkot, and Gurdaspur
Mandahar 401 Patiala State
Nagra 366 Sialkot and Gurdaspur
Batth 340 Lahore
Deshwal 321 Hissar, Karnal and Rohtak/td>
Kalair 312 Faisalabad / Toba Tek Singh
Godara 309 Hissar / Patiala State
Ghahi 301 Multan
Bal 298 Sialkot, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Amritsar, Ludhiana, Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Marhal also sometimes called Mandal 280 Patiala State and Karnal – Muslim Nawabs of Karnal belonged to this tribe
Auntal 274 Jalandhar and Ludhiana
Ves 274 Sargodha
Turkhel 255 Mianwali
Panghal 229 Hissar, Karnal and Rohtak
Janjhar 223 Patiala State
Jhalli 219 Patiala State
Tiwana 216 Patiala State – most Tiwana declared themselves as Rajputs
Punia 213 Hissar / Patiala State
Pawania 207 Hissar, Karnal and Patiala State
Billan 205 Patiala State
Malhi 205 Lahore, Sialkot, and Gurdaspur
Raad 201 Multan
Narwal 191 Hissar
Sudhan 175 Rawalpindi
Mami 166 Sialkot, and Gurdaspur
Uppal 163 Faisalabad, Lahore, Gujranwala and Patiala State
Nain 162 Hissar, Karnal and Rohtak
Sekhon 155 Lahore
Padda 151 Sialkot, and Gurdaspur
Jawana 150 Patiala State
Shajra 144 Multan
Rathi 144 Karnal and Hissar
Dhandhe 141 Patiala State
Mahil 134 Sialkot, Lahore, Amritsar, Ludhiana, Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Maalta 121 Multan
Basati 120 Patiala State
Raparia 119 Patiala State / Hissar
Sunar 107 Rohtak
Aujla 107 Jalandhar
Bore 102 Patiala State
Bandar / Wandar 100 Firuzpur, Hissar and Sirsa
Baghial 96 Rawalpindi
Kali Rauni 95 Patiala State
Dohan 83 Hissar
Gandhu 77 Patiala State
Gadra 77 Patiala State
Gulia 71 Patiala State
Ahlawat 70 Hissar, Karnal and Rohtak
Bola 70 Hissar and Patiala State
Maghial 69 Rawalpindi
Khatri 68 Sonepat, Karnal and Rohtak
Sodhi 65 Patiala State
Baidwan 61 Karnal and Hissar
Mander 59 Patiala State
Sarwara 58 Patiala State
Phogat 57 Patiala State
Dabdal 51 Hissar
Hari 49 Patiala State
Gurne 48 Patiala State
Boria 46 Rawalpindi
Dhauker 45 Patiala State
Sheoran 43 Hissar
Lahar 43 Patiala State
Sohi 42 Patiala State
Mandi 41 Patiala State
Narwan 41 Patiala State
Narwan 41 Patiala State
Sawaich 40 Hissar
Sangi 38 Firuzpur
Rattiwal 37 Patiala State
Jawanda 34 Patiala State
Dandiwal 34 Hissar
Bator 33 Patiala State
Tarka 30 Patiala State
Rai 29 Firuzpur
Chanhan 26 Hissar
Mial 25 Rawalpindi
Kandoe 24 Patiala State
Sehwag 24 Hissar
Maindal 22 Patiala State
Mahla 22 Hissar
Bagar 21 Patiala State
Gailan 20 Hissar
Phogat 20 Patiala State
Jassar 19 Patiala State
Sarao 13 Patiala State
Dullat 13 Patiala State
Jaglan 11 Hissar
Chande 10 Patiala State
Bandhel 10 Patiala State
Lahar 10 Hissar
Dhawe 10 Patiala State
Dalal 10 Rohtak
Khandi 9 Hissar
Boparai 9 Gurdaspur
Saran 7 Rohtak
Dagur 2 Gurgaon – a few families of Muley Jats

 

Population of Muslim Rajput Clans of British Punjab According to the 1911 Census of India

 

Tribe

Population Distribution
Bhatti 208,664 throughout Punjab, but special concentrations in Bhatiana (Firuzpur/Hissar/Sirsa), Bhatiore (Jhang/Chiniot), Gujranwala and Rawalpindi
Chauhan 109,533 Modern Haryana (especially Karnal and Panipat), Ambala, and central Punjab – the Karnal, Rohtak and Rewari Chauhan are a Ranghar tribe, in central found mainly in Lahore, Amritsar and Jallandhar
Khokhar 93,012 Jhang, Jhelum, Hoshiarpur, Sialkot, Hoshiarpur, Jallandhar and Gurdaspur
Sial 91,211 Jhang, Multan and other parts of South Punjab
Joiya 49,486 Along the banks of the Sutlej from Multan to Firuzpur extending to Hissar and Sirsa
Panwar 44,924 Rohtak, Karnal, Jind and Hissar (the eastern group); Bahawalpur, Multan and Muzaffargarh (the western group) – the eastern group are a Ranghar tribe; a smaller grouo also found in Jhelum
Wattu 34,696 Along the banks of the Sutlej from Bahawalpur to Firuzpur extending to Hissar and Sirsa
Naru 29,665 Present East Punjab, Amritsar, Jallandhar, Hoshiarpur and Ludhiana – by early 20th Century, several Naru were settled in Faisalabad and Sahiwal in the canal colonies
Ghorewaha 26,203 Present East Punjab, Jallandhar, Hoshiarpur and Ludhiana
Janjua 25,621 a western group in Rawalpindi and Jhelum and eastern group in Hoshiarpur
Sulehri / Sulehria 25,512 Sialkot and Gurdaspur
Mandahar 24,703 Modern Haryana (especially Karnal and Panipat), Ambala, and Hissar. They are a Ranghar tribe
Manj 20,633 Present East Punjab, Amritsar, Jallandhar, Hoshiarpur and Ludhiana
Bariah also pronounced as Varya 17,893 Present East Punjab, Jallandhar, Hoshiarpur and Ludhiana
Tomar 16,686 Modern Haryana (especially Rohtak and Panipat), Ambala, and in the Bahawalpur Stater
Mair-Minhas 15,075 Chakwal
Kharal 14,521 Faisalabad and Sahiwal
Jatu 13,825 Modern Haryana (especially Hissar and Gurgaon), Ambala, and Rohtak. They are a Ranghar tribe
Manhas / Minhas 10,382 From Rawalpindi to Hoshiarpur – a Muslim Dogra grouping
Awan 9.555 Two groups of Awan registered themselves as Rajput, those of Sonepat and near Delhi – who were a Ranghar tribe, and smaller group in Gurdaspur and Sialkot. All Awan declared themselves as Awan
Taoni 9,273 Ambala – a Ranghar grouping
Alpial 8,986 Attock – a branch of the Manj Rajput tribe
Chib 8,360 Gujrat, a Muslim Dogra clan
Jodhra 8,085 Attock District
Dhanyal 7,909 Rawalpindi – Murree Tehsil
Dhudhi 6,730 Sargodha, Jhang, Faisalabad and Sahiwal
Baghial 6,715 Rawalpindi
Dhamial 5,973 Rawalpindi
Bhakral 5,744 Rawalpindi and Jhelum
Bhakral 5,744 Rawalpindi and Jhelum
Khichi 4,774 Sargodha, Jhang and Sahiwal
Langrial 3,886 Multan, Sahiwal and Okara – northern branch in Rawalpindi/Jhelum and Gujrat – most northern Langrial declared themselves as Jat
Chadhar 3,825 Jhang District – outside Jhang most Chadhars registered themselves as Jat
Dahya 3,620 Ambala District – a Ranghar clan
Khanzada 3,662 Gurgaon – a branch of the Jadaun clan
Kalial 3,662 Rawalpindi and Jhelum
Dahya 3,620 Ambala District – a Ranghar clan
Kathia 2,900 Sahiwal and Okara
Kanial 2,317 Rawalpindi
Mangral 2,309 Rawalpindi
Nagrial 2,220 Rawalpindi
Kalyar 2,177 Sargodha – most Kalyar declared themselves to Jat
Raghubansi 2,135 Ambala – a Ranghar clan
Katil 2,104 Sialkot and Gurdaspur
Gaharwal 2,069 Rawalpindi
Nagyal 2,038 Rawalpindi and Jhelum
Qaimkhani 2,020 Hissar – essentially a Rajasthani tribe, a branch of the Chauhan
Rawat 1,971 Malerkotla State
Thathaal 1,618 Rawalpindi
Mekan 1,584 Sargodha – most Mekan declared themselves as Jat
Jhap 1,559 Jhang
Jamra 1,455 Dera Ghazi Khan
Tiwana 1,347 a western group in Kushab and eastern group in Patiala
Matyal 1,347 Rawalpindi
Jatal 1,310 Rawalpindi
Rathore 1,148 Hissar, Firuzpur and Bahawalpur, in areas bordering Bikaner. Rajasthani immigrants
Khuhi 1,148 Multan
Warha 1,288 In Hissar a Ranghar group, also found along the Sutlej in Firuzpur and Bahawalpur State
Dogar 1,300 Sahiwal and Okara – most Dogar registered themselves as Dogars and numbered 68,473
Jalap 1,172 Jhelum – a branch of the Khokhar tribe
Nagrawal 1,143 Rawalpindi
Ramial 1,120 Rawalpindi
Ghangar 1,002 Rawalpindi
Daha 991 Multan, Sahiwal and Okara – a branch of the Panwar
Badpyar 988 Delhi with villages near the Yamuna river – a Ranghar clan
Pundir 985 Ambala and Karnal – a Ranghar group with villages near the Yamuna river
Atiras 965 Patiala State
Kural 961 Rawalpindi
Phularwan 935 Sahiwal and Okara – a second group in Sialkot
Baghela 923 Sahiwal / Okara
Mukhmdal 852 Gujrat – a Chib sub-clan
Jora 834 Fazilka, Hissar and Sirsa
Attar 821 Sargodha
Mial 817 Rawalpindi
Hon 811 Rawalpindi – a branch of the Panwar tribe
Bargujar 805 Gurgaon – a Ranghar tribe found in Rewari
Mayen 802 Patiala State
Mahaar 792 Along the banks of the Sutlej from Bahawalpur to Firuzpur extending to Hissar and Sirsa – most Mahaar declared themselves as Jat
Adrah 792 Rawalpindi
Kala 747 Jhang
Sakhri 743 Hissar – a Ranghar clans, sub-division of the Jatu
Taraqar 710 Multan
Bhao 706 From Kharian to Gurdaspur – a Muslim Dogra group
Rath 706 Sahiwal / Pakpattan
Sarral 698 Rawalpindi
Luddu 680 Hoshiarpur
Gaurwa 644 Gurgaon – Ranghar group
Kethwal 642 Rawalpindi – Murree Tehsil
Doli 639 Sahiwal / Okara
Barial 633 Ludhiana District
Chandel 618 Present East Punjab, Jallandhar, Patiala and Ludhiana
Sohlan 606 Jhelum
Noon 599 Sargodha and Multan – a branch of the Bhatti tribe
Agan 569 Gurdaspur – Muslim Dogra clan/td>
Dhanwal 569 Sahiwal and Okara/td>
Jandran 551 Sahiwal / Okara
Bains 548 Rawalpindi – the majority of the Bains registered themselves as Jats
Ranjha 579 Jhelum / Chakwal
Ratial 549 Rawalpindi
Mughal 544 Rawalpindi
Satraola 544 Hissar – a Ranghar tribe
Bhan 519 Sargodha
Chatha 420 Rawalpindi
Jawal 288 Delhi – a Ranghar clan
Jadaun 165 Gurgaon and Karnal – a Ranghar tribe
Jaswal 160 Hoshiarpur
Meun 76 Multan and Bahawalpur State
Pathania 71 Gurdaspur – a Muslim Dogra group
Jaral 58 Kangra
Gondal 31 Rawalpindi – almost all the Gondals declared themselves as Jat, except a few in Rawalpindi

 

Population of Muslim Rajput Clans of British Punjab According to the 1901 Census of India

In this post, I make reference to the 1901 Census of India, which gave a breakdown of the larger Muslim Rajput clans of British Punjab. The whole Province of Punjab had a 24.4 million population in 1901, of which the Muslim Rajputs numbered 1,505,586. In 1901, the Punjab comprised five administrative divisions — Delhi, Jullunder, Lahore, Multan and Rawalpindi — and a number of princely states. During the course of the Census, those districts that lay across the Indus which formed the Peshawar Division were formed into a new province named the North West Frontier Province. Geographically, the province was a triangular tract of country of which the Indus River and its tributary the Sutlej formed the two sides up to their confluence, the base of the triangle in the north being the Lower Himalayan Range between those two rivers. Moreover, the province as constituted under British rule also included a large tract outside these boundaries. Along the northern border, Himalayan ranges divided it from Kashmir and Tibet. On the west it was separated from the North-West Frontier Province by the Indus, until it reached the border of Dera Ghazi Khan District, which was divided from Baluchistan by the Sulaiman Range. To the south lay Sindh and Rajputana, while on the east the rivers Jumna and Tons separated it from the United Provinces.

In present-day India, it included the regions of Punjab, Haryana, Chandigarh, Delhi, and Himachal Pradesh (but excluding the former princely states which were later combined into the Patiala and East Punjab States Union). While in present-day Pakistan, it included the regions of Punjab, Islamabad Capital Territory and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (until 1901).

My post on the Rajputs of Punjab gives more details as to the origin and distribution of the various Rajputs tribes.

 

Tribe

Population Distribution
Bhatti 249,302 throughout Punjab, but special concentrations in Bhatiana (Firuzpur/Hissar/Sirsa), Bhatiore (Jhang/Chiniot), Gujranwala and Rawalpindi
Chauhan 114,529 Modern Haryana (especially Karnal and Panipat), Ambala, and central Punjab – the Karnal, Rohtak and Rewari Chauhan are a Ranghar tribe
Khokhar 108,239 Jhang, Jhelum, Hoshiarpur, Sialkot and Gurdaspur
Sial 104,658 Jhang, Multan and other parts of South Punjab
Joiya 61,438 Along the banks of the Sutlej from Multan to Firuzpur extending to Hissar and Sirsa
Panwar 55,068 Rohtak, Karnal, Jind and Hissar (the eastern group); Bahawalpur, Multan and Muzaffargarh (the western group) – the eastern group are a Ranghar tribe
Gondal 36,088 The Gondal Bar (Mandi Bahaudin, Gujrat and Sargodha), also in Rawalpindi
Naru 34,152 mainly in what is now India Punjab – Jallandhar and Ludhiana
Ghorewaha 33,295 mainly in what is now India Punjab – Hoshiarpur, Jallandhar and Ludhiana
Sulehria / Sulehri 28,577 Sialkot and Gurdaspur – a Muslim Dogra group
Wattu 25,544 Along the banks of the Sutlej from Multan to Firuzpur extending to Hissar and Sirsa
Janjua 23,619 A western group found in Rawalpindi and Jhelum, and eastern group in Hoshiarpur
Baria, also pronounced Varya 21,991 Jalandhar, Hoshiarpur and Patiala State
Mandahar 21,764 Mainly Karnal and Panipat – a Ranghar group
Manj 20,736 Amritsar, Firuzpur and Jalandhar
Jatu 18,861 Hissar, Sirsa and Rohtak – a Ranghar
Taoni 18,384 Ambala and Patiala State – a Ranghar tribe
Tomar/ Tonwar 18,365 Hissar, Karnal and Rohtak – a Ranghar tribe
Mair-Minhas 15,697 Chakwal
Minhas/Manhas 13,471 from Rawalpindi in the west to Hoshiarpur in the east – a Muslim Dogra group
Dhudhi 11,764 In Sahiwal, mainly in the new districts of Vehari and Okara
Ranjha 11,764 Gujrat, Jhelum and Mandi Bahaudin
Bhakral 11,577 Rawalpindi and Jhelum/Chakwal
Chib 10.697 Jhelum and Gujrat – Muslim Dogra sub-group
Khichi 9,769 Between Ravi and Sutlej – now Vehari, Pakpattan and Sahiwal
Alpial 9,395 Attock and Rawalpindi
Mekan 8,915 Sargodha and Jhelum
Tiwana 6,326 A western group in Khushab and eastern group in Patiala
Khoja 6,326 Multan and Bahawalpur State
Baghial 5,769 Rawalpindi
Noon 4,866 Sargodha, Multan and southern Punjab
Thathaal 4,134 Rawalpindi, Jhelum and Gujrat
Dhanial 4,037 Murree Tehsil of Rawalpindi
Raghubansi 4,032 Hissar and Sirsa – a Ranghar group
Dahya 3,637 Ambala and Karnal – a Ranghar tribe
Kanyal 3,271 Rawalpindi and Jhelum
Nagial 3,036 Rawalpindi and Jhelum
Dhamial 2,967 Rawalpindi and Jhelum
Jhammat 2,550 Sargodha, Multan and South Punjab
Gaurwa 2,521 Gurgaon, Delhi and Rohtak – a Ranghar tribe
Kethwal 2,355 Rawalpindi – Murre Tehsil (now Kotli Sattian)
Katil 2,170 Sialkot and Gurdaspur – A Muslim Dogra sub-group
Jodhra 1,802 Attock and Rawalpindi District
Bargujar 1,502 Gurgaon and Delhi – Ranghar tribe
Hon 1,496 Rawalpindi
Lar 1,494 Multan and South Punjab
Jatal 1,451 Rawalpindi
Pundir 1,427 Ambala and Karnal – a Ranghar tribe
Atiras 1,416 Patiala State
Ranial 1,345 Rawalpindi and Jhelum
Sasral 1,292 Rawalpindi
Nissowana 996 Jhang and Sargodha
Jalap 949 Jhelum
Nagral 919 Rawalpindi
Adrah 909 Rawalpindi
Bhon 853 Sargodha
Kalial 773 Rawalpindi and Jhelum
Chandel 752 Lahore, Jalandhar and Ludhiana
Narma 748 Rawalpindi and Gujrat
Satti 744 Rawalpindi – Murree
Khatril 722 Rawalpindi
Mial 699 Rawalpindi
Gakhar 690 Rawalpindi and Jhelum
Targar 653 Multan and South Punjab
Rathore 587 Firuzpur and Hissar
Nagralwal 580 Rawalpindi
Jamra 548 Dera Ghazi Khan
Satraola 546 Hissar – a Ranghar group
Chatha 500 Rawalpindi
Kowar 493 Rawalpindi
Luddu/td>

491 Hoshiarpur
Kanial Chauhan 470 Rawalpindi
Sainiwal 439 Rawalpindi
Rath 410 Sahiwal and Okara
Johar 407 Rawalpindi
Bakhial 404 Rawalpindi
Jodha 368 Rawalpindi
Joota 367 Jhang
Bosan 340 Multan
Chadhar 334 Jhang
Mangral 331 Rawalpindi
Fattiana 318 Sahiwal
Pathial 311 Hoshiarpur
Maral 307 Jhang
Tanwari 273 Multan
Badhan 272 Rawalpindi
Salhal 262 Rawalpindi
Khel 234 Rawalpindi
Sudhan 227 Rawalpindi
Kangra 222 Rawalpindi
Dharwal 202 Mianwali
Hafial 197 Rawalpindi
Gaharwal 194 Rawalpindi
Kahut 178 Jhelum / Chakwal
Gangal 178 Rawalpindi
Saswal 174 Rawalpindi
Marial 167 Rawalpindi
Kathia 166 Sahiwal
Taranda 162 Multan
Tonda 156 Rawalpindi
Bhao Ragial 153 Rawalpindi
Bains 152 Rawalpindi
Budhal 152 Rawalpindi
Dalal 133 Rawalpindi
Satral 146 Rawalpindi
Jasgam 129 Rawalpindi
Matra 121 Multan
Kassar 113 Jhelum / Chakwal
Katoch 112 Kangra
Khakha 106 Rawalpindi
Jaswal 89 Hoshiarpur
Bagri 82 Firuzpur
Pathania 69 Gurdaspur
Ladhar 47 Rawalpindi
Jaral 47 Kangra
Kilchi 46 Rawalpindi
Thakkar 36 Gurdaspur
Guleria 11 Gurdaspur

 

Description of Major Muslim Communities in India : Bhatti

In this fifth post of mine on Muslim communities in India, I shall stick with the state of Uttar Pradesh (UP). The state is home to 38,519,225, who make up 19.3% of the total population. This population is not only large, but very diverse, home to perhaps as much as two hundred odd groups, castes and sects, speaking various dialects, as well as standard Urdu. In this post, I shall look the Bhatti community, which has traditions of migration from the Punjab, in particular from the Sirsa Rania region that is now divided between Haryana and Indian Punjab. Several Bhatti groups claim that there migration to UP was the result of the Chalisa Famine of 1783-84, the affected the territories south of Sultjej river, which were prior to the famine rich grassland. As the Bhatti were pastoral groups relying heavily on cattle rearing, and the Chalisa effectively wiped out these grasslands. However, as I shall discuss in this post, various groups of Bhattis have different and complex origin myths.

In Uttar Pradesh, the Bhatti are an extremely diverse set of communities, many with quite different origin myths. I shall initially give a brief background to the origin myths of the Bhatti, the migration history of the some of these groups and finally look briefly the Bhatti Taluqdars of Bara Banki, who were perhaps the most prominent family among Bhattis of UP. Just a point of clarification, the name is pronounced as Bhatti in UP, Haryana and Punjab, and Bhati in Gujarat, Rajasthan and Sindh. In terms of distribution, the Bhatti are fairly widespread, but there main concentrations are in Bulandshahr, Budaun, Kasganj, Farrukhabad, Barreilly, Pratapgarh and Barabanki districts.

Origin

According to tribal legends, the Bhatis were initially Yadavas, claiming descent from Krishna as an avatar of Vishnu, and thus identify themselves as a Chandravanshi Kshatriya. The Yadava homeland was the territory of Braj, roughly what is now Agra, Mathura and the adjoining areas of Rajasthan such as Bharatpur, from they were driven out by Paras Ram and fled to the Thar desert area of Jangladesh. Jangladesh was infertile and there was a constant scarcity of water throughout this region. The people had to wander from one place to another in search of water and food. These people were known as the Bhati. The word “Bhati” is therefore derived from the Hindi word, ‘Bhatakna’ (“to wander”). What is interesting about this legend is that it makes oblique reference to the most desert dwellers of the Jangaldesh acquired the name Bhati, which probably suggest a mixed origin. It is also interesting most Bhati of this region, now divided between Rajasthan and Sindh, remain herdsmen.

James Todd the colonial historian makes reference to another origin myth, involving a Mamnenez, the king of Khorasan, who drove out King Shal Bahan from Ghazni. He then established his capital at Sialkot. One of his sons was Rao Bhati and his descendants came to be called Bhatis. In Punjab, Rajah Risalu, the founder of Sialkot is often said to a Bhatti, and in that province, at least a third of those who called themselves were of the Bhatti clan. In Punjab, the Bhatti story also talks about a period of exile to Ghazni, followed by their return.

I now return to the Jangaldesh, the present regions of Jaisalmer, Bikaner and Mallani (split now between Umerkot in Pakistan and Barmer) and an individual named Jaisal. Jaisal is said to have founded the city of Jaisalmer in 1156 AD. The new fort that he built was on a hill called Trikuta. The state of Jaisalmer was positioned right on the route from Afghanistan to Delhi. Taking advantage of this strategic position, the Bhatis levied taxes on the passing caravans. At the height of Bhati power, it covered a large part of what is now the Bahawalpur Division of Pakistan, Bikaner extending into southern Haryana. With the arrival of the Rathore in Bikaner in 1504, the traditional homeland of the Bhatti split, with the northern region becoming known as Bhatiana.

Bhatiana

Almost all the tribal traditions connect the Bhati Rajputs to Bhatnair or Bhatner (present-day Hanumangarh in northern Rajasthan. Bhatner was historically important as it was situated on the route of invaders from Central Asia to India. Whether the Bhati Rajputs initially spread from Bhatner and Bhattiana or these were their final abodes is unclear. It might be the case that the drying up of the Ghaggar forced them to migrate to the plains of Punjab. However, its worth pointing out that most Bhattiana Bhattis trace their history to the desert principality of Jaisalmer in Rajasthan, in the border villages of Bikaner and some tehsils of Jodhpur (Osian and Shergarh). Sirsa in the heart of Bhattiana became home to a Muslim Bhatti principality, which survived until the arrival of the British in the 19th Century. Most of the local Rajput tribes, such as the Bhatti and Joiya had become Muslim with the arrival of the Mughals (early 16th Century) and led a pastoral life. However, with the Chalisa famine of 1783-84, almost the entire ecosystem was destroyed, forcing significant Bhatti migration into the Doaba region of Uttar Pradesh. The Awadh Bhattis have slightly different story to their migration, and I will look at that latter in the article.

Migration to UP – Traditions of the Bhatti of the Doab and Rohilkhand

Various groups of Bhatti in the Doab have different traditions as to their origin and migration. In terms of distribution, the Bhatti in the Doab are found mainly in Bullandshar, in Etah District mainly in Azamnagar tehsil, with Bhargain being their most important settlement, and in Kakrala in Badaun and Thriya Nizamat Khan in Bareilly. Most Bhatti settlements like along the banks of the Kali Nadi between Bullandshahr and Etah. Many of these Kali Nadi Bhattis have origin myths suggest that they predate the Chalisa migration. It is of course quite possible a number of waves of Bhatti arrived in UP over different times. They say they came to Bulandshahr under Kansal, or as others say, Deo and Kare, in the time of Prithivi Raj Chauhan (1149–1192 CE), and drove out or more likely subdued the Meos. The clan then divided into two branches, the Bhatti and Jaiswar. Interestingly, looking at colonial censuses of UP shows that most Jaiswars are Hindu, and Bhatti Muslim. It should also be noted that Hindu Jaiswar and Bhatti do not intermarry, under the rules of clan exogamy, considering themselves to be the same clan. Conversion to Islam is said to have taken place during the times of Qutubudin Aibak (1150–1210) and Alaudin Khilji (ruled 1296 to 1316). This would make them some of the earliest converts to Islam. In Bulandshahr, most Hindu Bhattis consider themselves as Gujjars, while the Muslims groups are now known as Ranghar, a term used to describe any Muslim Muslim Rajput. They are said to be over a 150 Bhatti villages in the Noida, Bulandshahr and Meerut region, most of whom are Muslim. Important villages include Til Begumpur, Hirnoti, Vellana, Vair ,Rabupura and Bakaswa.

The Bhatti of Til Begumpur

The most important Bhatti settlement in the Bullandshar / Greater Noida region is village of Til Begumpur. It was a site of an independent Bhatti Muslim principality until 1857. According to tribal traditions, the ancestors of the Bhattis are said to have come to Til Begumpur from Bbattiana, in the t.ime of Prithvi Raja of Dehli, and to settled here after expelling the Meos. The Bhatti are said to have founded two villages Ghodi Bachchera and Til Begumpur, now located on the outskirts of Greater Noida. The founders of these two villages were said to be two brothers. During 16th Century, Gujjars began immigrate from across the Yamuna, thereby reducing the Bhatti principality to a few villages. According to tribal tradition, Til was established by Rao Kasan Singh, who after defeat at the hands of a Allauddin Khilji was converted to Islamic . Kasan Singh was renamed himself Rao Qasim Ali Khan after conversion. While the village Ghodi was established by Kasan Singh’s younger brother Ranbir Singh who lived and died a Bhati Rajput. One of the brothers was also supposed to have fathered Bhati Gujjars after marriage with a Gujjar girl. The Bhattis in Til and other villages – Dhaula, Andhel, Mandpa, Kaumra and Jalalpur – all claim descent from Rao Qasim.

The Til Begumpur Bhatti’s played an important role in the 1857 War of Independence, and after the reestablishment of British rule, the estate was confiscated for their rebellion. The lands were handed over to the Skinner Estate, which was created by Colonel James Skinner CB (1778 – 4 December 1841) was an Anglo-Indian military adventurer in India, who became known as Sikandar Sahib later in life. The town of Sikanderabad near Tilla is named after Skinner. The Skinner family remain proprietors of Tilla until the independence of India in 1947.

The Bhatti of Bhargain

However, the Bhargain Bhattis have strong traditions of migration during the Chalisa, and as I have already said, this probably shows a steady flow of Bhatti migrants from the arid region of Bhattiana. According to the Bhargain tradition, two brothers named Khawaj Khan and Mehmood Khan came and settled in the region fertile region between the Bhurhi Ganga and Kali Nadi river. They are said to be fleeing the Chalisa famine and found the area occupied by Ahir groups, whom they displaced. The brothers are said to have founded the village of Bhargain during the later part of 18th century. From their various sons descend most of sub-clans of the Bhagain Bhattis. The region where the Bhattis settled was in a vacuum, and they became effectively independent, sometimes fighting with their neighbours the Pathans of Kasganj, and sometimes allied with them. Two descendants of Khawaj Khan, Dillu Khan and Sharabu Khan moved to Badaun and founded Kakrala. Most Kasganj, Badaun and Farrukhabad Bhattis claim some connection with the brothers Khawaj and Mahmood. Other then Bhargain, there are several villages in Azamnagar tehsil.

The Bhatti of Kakrala

The Kakrala Bhattis however have a slightly different story to their origin. According to one of their traditions in 1610 AD, the Bhattis were settled in Agra, when they seized Noorjahaan, the wife of the Mughal Emperor Jahangir, as she was travelling from Bengal to Delhi. When Jehangir came to know of this, he sent a force against them, forcing them to flee to the country of the Meos, lying east of their homeland in Agra. Their the Bhattis converted to Islam, and remained until the death of Jahangir. Their circumstances changed, when Noorjahaan wanted her son-in-law to be enthroned. She needed allies and the Bhatti came in support. They were then granted lands that became settlement of Kakrala. If this legend is to be believed then, Kakrala was founded a century before Bhargain, and the connection between the two Bhatti communities becomes weaker. The Kakrala Bhatti state was absorbed into the Rohilla state in early 18th Century, and the Bhattis also played a part in 1857. Closely connected to the Kakrala Bhattis are those of the town of Thirya Nizamat Khan in Bareilly, which said to have been founded by migrants from Kakra. In additions, there are also several Bhatti villages near Baheri in Bareilly District.

The Bhatti Khanzada

I now move to Awadh, and look at the very interesting community of the Bhatti of Barabanki. The Bhatti Khanzada of Awadh are a sub-group within the larger Khanzada community of Awadh. However, unlike other Khanzadas, the Bhattis are now closely associated with the Qidwai Shaikhs, with whom they intermarry.
There is also a distinct community of Bhattis found in the village of Yahiapur in Pratapgarh district. The Awadh region covers most of the eastern areas of Uttar Pradesh, and is home to a distinct culture with the extensive use of the Awadhi language.

The Awadh Bhatti also claim to orignate from Bhatner in Haryana, and the Bhattis were some of the earliest converts of Islam. According to tribal traditons, there ancestors Zabar Khan and his brother, Mustafa Khan, accompanied the governor Tatar Khan to Awadh at the time of the first Muslim conquest. In return for his services Zabar Khan received the parganas
of Mawai and Basorhi. He and his brother were the disciple of the saint, Saiyid Shah Jalal, whose tomb is at Basorhi, and in consequence of an insult offered to the holy man they exterminated the Brahmans of Mawai. Zabar Khan’s descendants
held the land for several generations, and then Kale Khan and Munna Jan divided their estates, taking Basorhi and Mawai respectively.
From the former springs the Neora house, which takes its name from a village in the south of Basorhi.

The two Bhatti taluqdars of Barauli and Neora in Barabanki district, and are closely related to the Qidwai Shaikhs, a neighbouring Muslim community through intermarriage. Other then the taluqdar families, the majority of the Barabanki Bhatti are small to medium sized farmers. With the abolishment of zamindari system of feudal ownership, has had a strong impact on the large landowning families, as much of their land has been redistributed. Bhattis are found mainly in and around the town of Mawai, with important villages include Makhdumpur, Neora and Basorhi.


Bhatti of Yahyapur in District Pratapgarh

The village of Yahyapur in Pratapgarh District has quite a unique history. The village is located on the north bank of the river Sai, near its junction with the Paraya stream, about seven miles from Partapgarh city. Located within the village is the famous temple of Bilkhar Nath, which stands among the ruins of Kot Bilkhar, the ancient fort of Ghaibar Sah, a Dikhit Rajput of Bisauli in Banda District. This man was sent by the Emperor of Dehli to exterminate the Bhars, and settling here founded the family of Bilkharia Thakurs, who ruled the pargana till the days of Raja Ramdev Singh. Ramdev Singh was defeated and slain some 650 years ago by Bariar Singh, the ancestor of the Bachgoti clan. On the division of the Baohgoti property the fort fell to the lot of Dingur Singh, the ancestor of the present taluqdar of Dalippur. It was destroyed by the forces of the Nawab of Awadh in 1773 after the defeat of Rai Maharban Singh. The ruins stand on the river bank on a plateau surrounded on three sides by ravines and covered with scrub jungle. The Awadh rulers then settled a colony of Bhattis, who now make up the majority of the population. However the shrine of Bilkbar Nath in the village has remained an important site of Hindu pilgramage.

Distribution of Bhattis by District According to 1891 Census of India
 

District
Hindu Muslim
Barreilly 3,763
Bulandshahr 3,482 2,455
Etah 80 2,671
Pratabgarh 1,652
Barabanki 1,353
Farrukhabad 10 1,177
Ghazipur 854
Aligarh 5 576
Moradabad 514
Saharanpur 37 443
Muzaffarnagar 80 343
Bahraich 267
Hardoi 198
Lakhimpur Kheri 195
Sultanpur 127
Unao 112
Gorakhpur 125 66
Mathura 49
Badaun 587
Meerut 180
Total Population in UP 4,619 17,170