Baghial, Manyal and Rupyal tribes

In this post I return the Chibhal country, and look at three tribes, namely the Baghial, Rupyaal and Manyal, who are found in this region. While Manyal are found entirely in the old Poonch Jagir, the other two are also found in Mirpur and the Pothohar regions. Like other tribes in the region, some sections of these tribes call themselves Jats, while other are Rajputs. The Manyal are also known as Malik Manyal, and have a lot in common with the Safial tribe discussed elsewhere. While Safial are concentrated in the Darhal region, the Manyal are found mainly in the Budhaal region. Both groups are collectively known as Malkana.

Baghial

I shall start of by looking at the Baghial. Like other clans looked in my posts, the Baghial have a number of traditions as to their ancestry. They are found in Pothohar, Mirpur and the old Poonch Jagir. Those of Rawalpindi claim to of Panwar (Agnivanshi) lineage, while those of Mendhar considers themselves to of Thakyal (Suryavanshi) lineage. It could be that indeed these two Baghial are distinct clans. However, the Mendhar Baghial to have legends that a branch of their tribes settled in the Pothohar region. Just one more point, the Baghial are entirely distinct from the Bughial, who are branch of the Ghakkar tribe.

The Panwar Baghials

According to the Baghial of Pothohar, they are closely related to the Bangial, a tribe of Jat/Rajput status found throughout northern Punjab. In Pothohar, the Baghial are found entirely in Rawalpindi District, where they occupy five villages in Gujar Khan Tehsil. They are often confused with the Bughial, who are clan of the Gakhar tribe, but with whom they have no relations. The common ancestor of both tribes is Bangash Khan, the Baghial being descended from his eldest son Bugha Khan, which would therefore make them also of Panwar ancestry. Another difference relates to the fact that while Bangial are found throughout northern Punjab, the Baghial are concentrated in Rawalpindi, and only claim to be of Rajput status. Important Baghial villages include Dhamali, Loona, Dhok Sumbhal, Kanoha in Kallar Syedan Tehsil, Pind Dara, Supiyali Baghial and Maira Mohra, all in Rawalpindi Tehsil.

The Thakyal Baghials

In the Poonch Jagir, mainly in present day Mendhar, the Baghial claim to be a branch of the Thakyal Rajputs. The Thakyal Rajputs are of Suryavanshi lineage. The Thakyals are named after Raja Jothar Singh Thakyal who established the Bhimber state in northern Punjab at the foothills of the Himalayas. There was a Thakyal Rajput by the name of Rusmi Dev who lived in a place called Thakar Dhooli, near the village Dhuruti, located near Ziarat Saen Kamla Badshah, now located some two kilometres on the Pakistan side of the Line of Control dividing Jammu and Kashmir.

 

Rusmi Dev in his descendants established a presence in the Rajouri and Mendher areas, and threw a challenge to the rule and authority of Jayrah clan. The relationship between the Thakyals and the Jayrahs deteriorated resulting in a war between the two clans. Led by Rusmi Dev, Thakyals defeated the Jayrahs (Jarals) and he took over as a ruler of this tiny state. It was a time when Islam was fast spreading all over Hindustan. With influence of Islam growing in the land Rusmi Dev, he also embraced Islam and changed his name to Rustam Khan. He ruled his territory till his death and was laid to rest in Dhuruti where his tomb still exists. Rustam Khan had four sons. His eldest son was named as Bagh Khan. Bagh Khan migrated Mendhar area and founded a village known as Sangal, presently called Narol. The other three were Sangi Khan, Kangi Khan and Kaloo Khan. Sangi Khan’s descendants live in Muzafarabad and Bagh in Azad Kashmir, Abbottabad in the Hazara region, and Gujarkhan and Rawalpindi in Punjab. It could that the Panwar Baghial of Pothohar are really Sangi Khan’s branch of the tribe.

The Baghial first settled in Sangal area now called Narol but later speard over to a number of villages like Kalaban, Salwah, Harni and Gursai. There are few Baghial families living in Sarhutti, Ari and Galhutta.

The Jat Baghials

A second group of Baghial are found in Haveli Baghal, a village in Dadyal Tehsil of Mirpur. Unlike the Mendhar Baghial, this lineage considers itself to be Jat, and intermarries with other clans of Jats such as the Rachyal and Roopyal. In Mendhar itself, the Baghial of the villages of Thera, Banola and Kasblari, consider themselves as Jats, and intermarry with other Jat clans.

Manyal

The Manyal trace descent to the town of Rajouri, and the ruler of the town called Manipaal, who lived around the late 12th Century. Manipal belonged the Pal lineage of Rajputs, who around this time were rulers of several principalities in the Pir Paanjal region. In some sources, Mani pal is referred to as Amna pal. It is traditionally believed that ‘Pal’ originated from Sanskrit ‘Pala’ meaning protector or keeper. The Pal Rajahs of the Pir Panjaal claimed a mythical origin from the Pala dynasty of Bengal. Manipal’s ancestral is said to have to come from the Pal kingdom and settled in Rajouri, where are said to have overthrown the Khasiya. Several rulers in what is now Himachal Pradesh also claim to be Pal Rajputs, such as the rulers of Bhajji. Manipal’s own rule was overthrown by Rai Noorudin Khan, founder of the Jarral Rajput line of rulers in Rajouri. Noorudin Khan arrived as a refugee from Kangra, and was greeted by Manipal, who offered his hospitality. The Rai took advantage of this, and seized the throne of Rajauri. In this way Raja Noor-Ud-Din laid the foundation of Muslim Jarral rule in Rajouri in 1194 A.D, which lasted till 21st October 1846 A.D. The Rai took advantage of this, and seized the throne of Rajauri. Manipal and his supporters fled to the region of Budhaal. A branch of his family settled in Majwhaal in Kotli District.

 

In exile in Budhaal, a prince seventh in decent from Manipal is said to have met a Sufi saint by the name of Doodh Haqani, and converted to Islam. He was then known as Din Mohammad. His Fathi Mohammad settled in ‘Moharra’, and was nicknamed Manyaala, on account of his descent from Raja Amna Pal, his clan is still known as Manyaal. Din Mohammad’s son Fateh Mohammad is said to have seized Thakyala from the Thakyal Rajputs. Fateh Mohammad established his base at Mohra village, and all the current Manyals trace their descent from him. They are also known as Malik or Malik Manyaal. The Manyal have produced Sain Bahadur, a famous Naqsbandi Sufi of the Chibhal region. Other than Mohra, the Manyal are also found in Gonthal. The bulk of the tribe remains in Budhaal tehsil.

 

Rupyal

The Rupyal, or The Rupyal or sometimes pronounced as Ruplaal claim descent from the legendary Raja Salvahan, the founder of the city of the Sialkot. He is said to have had 15 sons, the sixth one being called Roop or Roopa. Roopa was said to have left the Sialkot and settled in Pind Dadan Khan, sometime around the conquest of that region by Mahmood of Ghazni. Fourteenth in descent from Rajah Roopa Dev was an individual named Mal. Mal is said to have converted to Islam and adopted the name Rai Jalaluddin. After his conversion, the Rai is said to have left Pind Dadan Khan and settled in Poonch. This settlement occurred in the 15th Century, but happened before the invasion of Kashmir by the Mughal Emperor Akbar, according to Mohamad Din Fauq. The Rai settled in Sarhroon in Poonch. In Sarhoon, there was long settled a clan of local notables called the Chaudhary. When the Mughal Emperor Jahangir visited Kashmir, the Chaudharys provided him with excellent hospitality. As a result, the Emperor granted Sarhoon to the Chaudharys. This caused conflict with Rai Sher Khan, who was then chief of the Rupyaals, who over powered the Chaudhry’s and established Rupyaal rule over the Sarhoon and the villages nearby. The Rai remained rulers of this petty state until the hills of the Chibhal were conquered by the Dogras in the early 19th Century. The Poonch branch, and Pothohar branch of Rupyals consider themselves to be Rajputs, while those in Mirpur call themselves Jats, and intermarry with other tribes of Jat staus.

 

The Rupyal are a tribe found mainly in the Mirpur District, Haveli District and the Pothohar region of the Punjab, Pakistan. In Mirpur they are found in Pandkhor and villages in Dadyal tehsil. In the old Poonch Jageer, their villages include Miani Basti (Haveli), Choi, Degwar Maldyaal, and Chathra. A second cluster of Rupyaal villages are found in Mang Dhagron in Sudhnoti District.

In Punjab they are found mainly in Rawalpindi District, with Doberan in Kahuta and their villages in Kallar Syedan tehsil include Nothia Shareef, Mohra Ropial, Chapri Akkoo, Chanam Shareef and Chauntra. In Jhelum, they are found in Makhiala.

 

Khokhar Population of Punjab According to the 1901 Census of India

In this post I will give the distribution of the Khokhar population according to the 1901 Census. As the table shows, most of the Khokhar were found in the river valleys of the Jhelum, Chenab and Sutlej. I will ask the reader to look at my posts on the Bandial and Bhachar as well as the Khokhar of UP, which gives some background to this community.

District / States Population
Shahpur 24,351
Bahawalpur State 16,540
Jhang 16,398
Multan 11,606
Chenab Colony 8,511
Montgomery 8,093
Mianwali
4,573
Dera Ghazi Khan 4,199
Muzaffargarh
4,020
Jhelum
3,865
Gujrat
1,638
Lahore  1,503
Firuzpur  1,169
Sialkot  784
Other Districts  4,713
Total Population 107,943

 

Baghban and Malyar/Maliar Population of Punjab and the North West Frontier Province According to the 1901 Census of India

In this fourth post on the distribution of communities, I will look at two related communities, the Baghban and Malyar, sometimes spelt Maliar. Both were found largely in the Pothohar plateau, and neighbouring areas of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, such as the Peshawar valley and the Hazara region. In terms of geographic distribution, they have much in common with the Awans, whose distribution I have looked at in a previous post. The term Baghban or sometimes pronounced Baghwan, is simply the Farsi equivalent of the Hindi word Mali meaning a ‘gardener,’ and commonly used as equivalent to Arain in the Western Punjab. According to Rose, the colonial British ethnologist:

Baghbans do not form a caste and the term is merely equivalent to Mali, Maliar, etc.

There is some confusion as to whether the Baghban and Maliar are distinct communities. In Peshawar, the Maliar and Baghban do seem to be distinct communities. But in other parts, the two terms are used interchangebly. It is also likely that Baghban of Patiala State were really members of the Arian caste. Time permitting, I will write a post on the Maliar caste. I would ask the reader to look at my post on the Maliar.

Baghban Population of Punjab

District Muslim Hindu Total
Rawalpindi  502  141  643
Patiala State
 397  397
Gujrat
207
  207
Mianwali
189    189
 Other Districts  257  50  307
Total Population  1,552 191 1,743

 

Baghban Population of North West Frontier Province

 

District Population
Peshawar  9,427
Bannu  2,155
Other Districts  289
Total Population  11,871

 

 

Malyar in Population Punjab

 

District Population
Rawalpindi  50,125
Jhelum  28,371
Shahpur  2,651
Total Population  81,093 

Malyar in NWFP

 

District Population
Peshawar  18,319
Hazara  7,770
Kohat  1,078
Total Population  27,167

 

Awan Population of Punjab and the North West Frontier Province according to the 1901 Census

This is my third post, looking at the population distribution according to the 1901 Census of Punjab. In this post, I look at the Awan caste, who unlike the castes looked in previous posts such as the Dogar and Kamboh, is entirely Muslim. I will ask to the reader to look at my posts on the Kamboh, to give some background as geographical spread of Colonial Punjab. In addition, for completeness’s sake, I would ask you to look at my posts on the 1931 Census of Hazara, as well my the post on the Budhal, who are sub-group of the Awans, to get some background information on the caste. This post will also look at their distributions according to the 1901 Census of the of the North West Frontier Province of Pakistan.

Awan Groups

In terms of distribution, about two-thirds of the Awans lived in the Pothohar plateau, and the Salt Range mountains, which were located just below the plateau. The Awan population of the North West Frontier Province were culturally close to the Awan of the Pothohar. Both spoke related languages, the Hindko and Pothohari languages. The Awan of Mianwali spoke an intermediate dialect between Hindko and Seraiki. While the Awans of Bannu and Dera Ismail Khan, and the southern Punjab districts of Dera Ghazi Khan, Muzaffargarh, Multan and the Bahawalpur State spoke Seraiki.

A third cluster of Awans was found in what is now Indian Punjab. The Awan of Sialkot, Gujranwala and Lahore were culturally similar to the East Punjab Awans. There were Awankari, or Awan inhabited territories in Ludhiana, Hoshiarpur, Jalandhar and Kapurthala state, all teritories now located in Indian Punjab.

Awan Population of Punjab

 

District Population
Rawalpindi 140,835
Jhelum 99,542
Shahpur 55,387
Sialkot 24,459
Mianwali 23,449
Gujrat 14,864
Hoshiarpur 13,652
Jalandhar 12,350
Multan 6,600
Bahawalpur 4,815
Ludhiana 4,580
Lahore 3,887
Dera Ghazi Khan 3,442
Muzaffargarh 3,232
Chenab Colony 3,001
Jhang  2,900
Montgomery  1,737
Amritsar  1,683
 Gujranwala  1,018
Gurdaspur 1,008
Firuzpur 490
Kapurthala 483
Ambala 193
Total Population 421,112

Awans in the North West Frontier Province (NWFP)

In the NWFP, now known as Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, the Awans were concentrated in the Peshawar valleyHazara Region and the southern Seraik areas of Kohat, Bannu and Dera Ismail Khan.

District Population
Peshawer 111,339
Hazara 91,474
Kohat 22,358
Bannu 8,667
Dera Ismail Khan 6,396
Malakand, Dir, Swat, and Chitral Territories 512
 Other Districts
Total Population 241,006

 

Adrah, Gungal/ Gangal, Miyal/Mial and Ratial tribes

In this post, I will focus on four little known tribes found in the Pothohar region, namely the Adrah, Gangal, Miyal and Ratial. I will ask the region to look at my post on the Budhal and Kanyal tribes, which give some background to the tribal history of this region. An interesting thing about the various tribes in this region is that there name often ends in al, which is patronymic, for example, the sons of Kals, are the Kalyal and so on, very similar to the Arabic Bin or Slavic ovich or ov. The aals started off as clans of a larger tribe, such as Kanyal being an aal of the Chauhan tribe, which overtime grew in numbers, leading separation from the parent stock. Both tribes have very similar customs, being historically farmers and speaking the Pothwari language.

 

Adrah

The first tribe I will look at are Adrah, who are found mainly in Gujarkhan and neighbouring Mirpur District. Like other Pothahar clans, the Adrah are split between Jat and Rajput sections, this especially the case among the Mirpur Adrah, who consider themselves as Jats

According to tribal myths, the Adrah are a branch of the Chauhan Rajputs, and Adrah is simply the Pothohari way to pronounce Hara, which is a major branch of the Chauhans. The Chauhan is perhaps the most famous of the Rajput clans, for Prithvi Raj, the last Hindu ruler of North India, belonged to this clan. According to their bardic traditions, the Chauhan are one of the four Agnivanshi or ‘fire sprung’ tribes who were created by the gods in the Agni kund or ‘fountain of fire’ on Mount Abu to fight against the Asuras or demons. Chauhan is also one of the thirty-six ruling races of the Rajputs.

In the early eleventh century, the Chauhans later asserted their independence from the Pratiharas, with the Sakhambari king Ajaya-Raja founded the city of Ajayameru (Ajmer) in the southern part of their kingdom, and in the mid twelfth century, his successor Vigraharaja enlarged the state, captured Dhilika (the ancient name of Delhi) from the Tomaras and annexed some of their territory along the Yamuna River, including Haryana and Delhi. In 12th century the Chauhans dominated Delhi, Ajmer and Ranthambhor. They were also prominent atGodwar in the southwest of Rajputana, and at Hadoti (Bundi and Kota) in the east. Chauhans adopted a political policy that saw them indulge largely in campaigns against the Chalukyas and the invading Muslim hordes.

 

 

The Chauhan kingdom became the leading state and a powerful kingdom in Northern India under King Prithviraj III (1165-1192), also known as Prithvi Raj Chauhan or Rai Pithora. Prithviraj III has become famous in folk tales and historical literature as the Chauhan king of Delhiwho resisted and repelled the invasion by Mohammed of Ghor at the first Battle of Tarain in 1191. Armies from other Rajput kingdoms, including Mewar, assisted him. The Chauhan kingdom collapsed after Prithviraj faced defeat in the war.[1][2] the battle ground against Mohammed of Ghor in 1192 at the Second Battle of Tarain. Prithviraj’s defeat and capture at Tarain ushered in Muslim rule in North India by the Delhi Sultanate. The Chauhans of Ajmer remained in exile due to Muhammad of Ghor and his successors, the Sultans of Delhi, and thus swelled the ranks of the armed forces of the Maharana of Mewar, until 1365, when Ajmer was captured by the Sisodias rulers of Mewar, and Ajmer was then returned to the Chauhans.

 

 

A branch of the Chauhans, led by Govinda, the grandson of Pritviraj III, established themselves as rulers of Ranthambore from the thirteenth to the fifteenth centuries, until Ranthambore was captured by Rana Kumbha of Mewar. The Haras dynasty of the Chauhans, moved into the Hadoti region in the twelfth century, capturing Bundi in 1241 and ruled there until the twentieth century. One sept of these Hada Rajputs won Kota.

I now come specifically to the Adrah. According to their traditions, their ancestor Hadi Rai arrived from Hadoti in Rajasthan, and settled in Gujarkhan, where he became a Muslim. According to some traditions, the town of Gujar Khan is named after an Adrah Rajput. The town is still home to a large community of Adrah Chauhans. They are found mainly in Rawalpindi and Gujarkhan tehsils. A smaller number are also found in Mirpur region of Azad Kashmir. The village of Usman Zada Adra is named after an decendent of Hadi Rai, and is the centre of the tribe.

In Rawalpindi District, the main Chauhan settlements are at Usman Zada Adra where the village is owned by the Hadi Rai Chohans in Gujar Khan Tehsil. Starting with Rawalpindi Tehsil, there is a settlement in Sadar Rawalpindi at Adra, while others are smaller settlements at Panjgran, Sihala and Sahib Dhamial, the last of which they share with the Dhamial Rajputs. While in Tehsil Gujar Khan, the villages of Jhanda, Dhoke Chauhan, Mankiala, Mandra and Adra Usmanzadah have large concentrations of Chauhans while in Tehsil Rawalpindi they are present in significant numbers in Darkali, Kotlah, and Jhatta Hathial.

Gangal

The Gungal, sometimes spelt Gangal, found throughout this region. As mentioned in my introduction, the tribes in the region have names ending in al, meaning son of or descendent of a named individual. In the case of the Gungal, that would be mean that they are descendent of Gang, or possible Ganga, a common first name among Hindus of all castes. Like most Punjab tribes, there are a number of different traditions as to the origin of this tribe. The Gangal of Gujar Khan, Chakwal and Jhelum claim that they are a section of the Bhatti Rajputs, therefore Gang or Ganga belonged to the Bhatti tribe, a well-known tribe of Rajputs found throughout Punjab. In this region, being Rajput is a matter of status, which can be both gained or lost. If an ancestor took up cultivation, then his descendants would be classified as Jat, or vice versa, if they rose in prominence, they would acquire the status of Rajput. In the latter case, they would restrict marriage with other tribes of Rajput status. Often, a branch of the tribe would call itself Rajput in one village, and in a neighbouring villages, they would be simple cultivators, and be known as Jat. With regards to the Gungal, most of those found in Rawalpindi District call themselves Rajputs, while in Jhelum are Jat, and intermarry with tribes of Jat status.

However, the Gangal of Rawalpindi Tehsil, have a completely different origin myth. Gang according to them was not a Bhatti, but an Awan, therefore according to the Rawalpindi Gangals, they are clan of the Awan tribe. The Rawalpindi Gangal trace their descent from Qutab Shah’s son Muzamal Ali, nicknamed Kalgan. Briefly, according to Awan tribal traditions, their ancestor was a Qutb Shah, who is said to have accompanied and assisted Mahmud of Ghazna in his early eleventh century conquests of what today forms parts of Afghanistan, Pakistan and Northern India. It is claimed that in recognition of their services and valour, Mahmud bestowed upon Qutb Shah and his sons (who, according to tribal traditions, settled primarily in the Salt Range) the title of Awan, meaning “helper”. Coming back to the Gangal, a descendent of Muzamal Ali named Gohar Shah was their ancestor. This Gohar Shah was nicknamed Ganga, and the Ganga are the aal or descendants of this Ganga. It is interesting to note the Gangal villages in Rawalpindi tehsil are surrounded by the Awan villages, therefore it is possible that they have affiliated themselves with the dominant group, while in Gujarkhan, they maintain links with the Rajput clans, which in turn dominate that region.

With regards to their distribution, in Rawalpindi District, their villages include Gungal, Mujahid Gungal in Rawalpindi Tehsil, Sood Gungal located within the Islamabad Capital Territory. In Gujar Khan tehsil, they are found in number of villages such as Faryal, Gungal, Narali Jabbar and Sui Cheemian. Other Gungal villages in Rawalpindi District include Chakyal near Hardogher, Dhamnoha and Samote in Kallar Syedan Tehsil, and Bimma Gungal in Kahuta Tehsil. In neighbouring Jhelum District, their main village is Gungal, while in Chakwal District their villages include Dhok Vazira, Mak and Mohra Gungal near Kallar Syden. In Attock District, they are found in the village of Gangal in Fateh Jang Tehsil.

Gangal Population According to 1911 Census

 

District

 

Awan Jat Total
Jhelum

 

  1,049 1,049
Rawalpindi

 

1,900 569 2,469
Attock

 

540   540
Other Districts

 

513   513
Total

 

2,953 1,618 4,571

The 1911 Census showed clearly how the Gangal identity was divided, with a third declaring themselves to be Jats, and remaining two-thirds as Awans.

Miyal

Miyal, or sometimes written as Mial, are tribe found mainly in Rawalpindi and Chakwal districts. They are descendants of a Mian, which in there case may not refer to a single common ancestor, but is a term which is often used to describe any holyman or Sufi saint. These is also shown by the fact that different Mial groups have different origin myths. According to 1911 Census of India, about 807 Mial declared themselves as Rajput, while 25 declared themselves as Jats. Some Mial groups also say that they are Qureshi Arabs, while others claim to be Mughals.There main villages include Malluwala in Pindigheb Teshsil and Mial in the Fateh Jang Tehsil of Attock District, the village of Mial in Rawalpindi District, and the villages of Budhial, Mureed, Mial and Warwal in Chakwal District. In addition, Mial settlements are also found in the Gujar Khan Tehsil, such as Sapiali Khinger.

Ratial

The Ratial are Rajput tribe, found mainly in Rawalpindi District. There customs are similar to neighbouring tribes such as the Bangial and Kanyal. Like other tribes in the region, they have several traditions as to their origin. According to one such tradition, the tribe are descended from Khattar Khan, the ancestor of the Khattar tribe. Khattar Khan had six sons, Jand Khan,Isa Khan, Sarwar Khan, Firoz Khan, Sehra Khan and Pehru Khan. About three generations after his death, the tribe lost Nilab but they took possession of the open country between Rawalpindi and the Indus which became known by the name of Khattar. The descendants of Jand Khan took possession of the district called after them Jandal between Khushhalghar and Nara. From Feroz Khan the Drek family has descended. His great- grandson was Ratnah from whom have descended the clan known as Ratial. The Khattar tribe, like the Awans claim descent from Qutub Shah, which would make the Ratial Alvi Arabs.

However, another tradition makes Ratnah out to be a Manhas Rajput, who left Kangra in the 15th Century and settled in Potohar region, and converted to Islam. His descendants are known the Ratial. A few generations from Ratnah were two brothers Jairo Khan and Bhairo Khan. Jairo is said to have founded the village Jairo Ratial, and his brother Bhairo founded the neighbouring village Bhair Ratial. Almost all the other Ratial’s trace there descent from these two villages. Claims to Minhas ancestry are more widely accepted, certainly by the Ratial’s of Gujarkhan.

The Ratial Minhas rose to some significance as rulers of the large part of the present Rawalpindi District known as Ratala, centred around the village of Ratala in Gujar Khan Tehsil. They were displaced from Ratala by a Janjua chief named Raja Abdullah Khan in the 18th Century, who had himself been displaced by the upheaval of the Sikh conquest of Garjaak and Darapur in Jhelum, and as a result took his remaining army and conquered the region of Ratyal from a Ratial chief who was loyal to the Sikh empire. He defeated the Ratial Chief and although the region remained known Ratala. With this, the Ratial ceased to play any important political role in the region. The Ratial thereafter sunk to the status of farmers, and according to 1911 Census of Punjab, they numbered 549.
Their principle villages are Ratial (near Dina) and Darapur in Jhelum District, and Ratial, Bher Ratial, Jairo Ratial and Puraney Ratial, in the Gujar Khan Tehsil of Rawalpindi District. They also found in Banoti Niar and Chak Beli Khan villages south of Rawalpindi. There are also number of Ratial villages in Attock District.

Rawal of Pakistani Punjab

In this post, I will look at a little known Punjabi Muslim community called the Rawals. Like the Khatiks referred to in my earlier post, the Rawals as a community form an important part of the Punjabi Muslim diaspora, with many migrating to Malaysia and Hong King in the early 20th Century.

Like most other Punjabi groups, the Rawal have a complex origin. According to tribal traditions, they are of Arab origin. The ancestor of their tribe was an individual named Ryal, after who they are said to get their name, was in the service of the Prophet. Once when alms were being given by the Prophet, no one came forward to receive them, whereupon Ryal accepted them. Over time, Ryal was corrupted to Rawal, after their settlement in India. By the beginning of the 20th, the Rawal were found mainly in what now Indian Punjab were engaged in petty trade. They had much in common with groups such the Bhatra and Ramaiya, who were also engaged in petty trade.

Rose, the early 20th Century British ethnologist argued the Rawal were really a group of Jogi who had converted to Islam. He argued that the term Rawal was generally used as a synonym for the Jogi, though, strictly speaking, it only denoted Muslim Jogi, who was generally also known as a Jogi-Rawal. The question then is who or what is a Jogi. Jogi, or more correctly Yogi is someone, in tantra traditions of Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism, is someone who is a practitioner of the tantra (a tantrika). In Classical Sanskrit, the word yogi is derived from yogin, which refers to a practitioner of yoga. Yogi is technically male, and yoginī is the term used for female practitioners. The two terms are still used with those meanings today, but the word yogi is also used generically to refer to both male and female practitioners of yoga and related meditative practices belonging to any religion or spiritual method. The yogi, or by the middle ages the Jogi had become a religious order, living a wondering life as mendicants. In Punjab, the Jogi like in many other parts of India had evolved into a sectarian caste, as distinct from a holy order. Conversion to Islam, which, if we accept Rose, did not stop the Muslim groups to continue to practice as Jogi.

Etymologically, Rawal is a title, the Sanskritised version being Rajakula, meaning lord and used by many feudal families in North India. It could be that Rawal is not a distortion of Ryal, but a title adopted by a group of Jogis, to distinguish themselves from other Jogi groups. Whether they were of Arab origin as their traditions claim, or Jogi converts to Islam, what is clear is that they had close relationship with Hindu Jogi groups in Punjab. According to some traditions, the city of Rawalpindi is named after them.

In the early 20th Century, the Rawals had continued the practice of acquiring knowledge from the Hindu Jogis, and many continued to live a nomadic existence. They were a classic community who practised syncretism, combining aspects of Hinduism and Islam. Many left their villages and spent part of their as wondering holy men. By the early 20th Century, many Rawals had taken up the profession of hakims (physicians), practitioners of the unani medicine. The Rawals were also employed in rural Punjab to carry out surgery and eye operations, leaving there villages at the beginning of winter to visit a well-established client network.

The Rawal like the Barwala and Khatik referred to in earlier posts were not granted agricultural status under the Punjab Land Alienation Act. The impact of this decision was that they were unable to own or purchase land. Many Rawal therefore began to migrate to British ruled Malaysia and Singapore.  Pandit Harikishan Kaul, the Census Commissioner of Punjab for 1911 Census wrote:

From a representation made to me by the Rawals of Hoshiarpur, it appears that they are not homeless people but are enterprizing traders and adventurers who have earned plenty of money by travel in Europe, America, Java and Australia. They have traders large or small amongst them and also pedlers, but they are said to own fairly large commercial concerns in Malaya, Singapore, Sumatra, Celebes, Borneo, Australia and Burma, and some cf them are engaged in pearl fishery in the Malay Islands.

 

They now form important communities within the Punjabi Muslim diaspora communities in those two countries. A second wave of Rawal migration has now taken them to the United States and United Kingdom.

The Partition of Punjab in 1947 affected the Rawal even more badly then the Khatik, with the majority found in territory that is now Indian Punjab. The effect of partition has been that almost all the syncretic traditions have been abandoned. Many of the refugee Rawal are now settled in Faisalabad, Gujranwala and Sialkot. Like the Khatik, they are now considered to be a sub-group of Shaikhs. I would ask to read The Migration Process: Capital, Gifts and Offerings Among British Pakistanis which explores the changing situation of the Rawal settled in the UK.

Distribution of Rawal in Punjab by District According to 1911 Census of India

 

District Population
Gurdaspur 4,079
Sialkot 3,687
Hoshiarpur 3,265
Amritsar 3,119
Jalandhar 2,554
Gujranwala 1,746
Kangra 1,164
Gujrat 997
Lahore 933
Jhelum 693
Kapurthala State 668
Ludhiana 400
Other districts 1,637
Total Population 24,942

 

Narma and Sohlan Rajput

In this post, I look at two related tribes, the Narma and Sohlan. Both are branches of the famous Parmar Rajputs, who ruled much of central India, from their capital at Ujjain. Once the Parmar state was destroyed, groups of Parmar migrated to different parts of India, including the foothills of the Pir Panjaal.

Narma

Starting off with the Narma, they are a clan of Paharia Rajputs, whose territory extends from Mirpur and Kotli in Azad Kashmir to Gujrat and Rawalpindi in Punjab. According to tribal traditions, they are Agnikula Rajputs descendant of Raja Karan. This Raja Karan was said to be from Ujjain or Kathiawar, although the Thathaal tradition is he was the ruler of Thanesar in Haryana. My post on the Nonari also explores this mysterious figure found among the traditions of many Punjab tribes. The Narma, therefore are Panwar Rajputs, who ruled Malwa and Ujjain, their famous kings names were Raja Bikramjeet and Raja Bahoj. During the invasions of Mahmood of Ghaznai the Narma were said to be living in the Haryana. Naru Khan 8th descent of Raja Karan accepted Islam and the tribe were named after him; Naru or Narma Rajputs. They were land owner of several villages within Haryana; the chief men of this tribe were known by the title Rai, and this title is still used by their descendants presently. Most Narma Rajputs have accepted Islam, although some remain Hindu. The Panwars are said to have thirty four branches, named after places, titles, language and person’s names like Omtawaar were known as the descendants of Omta, similarly the descendants of Naru became Naruma and then Narma.

 

Naru and Narma

There might be a common ancestory between Naru and Narma, they both claim their ancestor name was Naru, who accepted Islam and given new name Naru Khan during the invasion of Mahmood of Ghazna, and he lived in Haryana area. However, the Narma claim that they are of Panwar Rajput ancestry, while Naru origin stories make reference to Chandravanshi origin (Please see my article on the Pothohar tribes on Rajput sub-divisions). Coming back to the Narma, their origin myth refers to a Rai Pahre Khan, seven generations from Naru Khan who came from Kaithal in Haryana to what is now Jhelum district and founded two villages Fatehpur and Puran. A descendent of Pahre Khan, Rai Jalal Khan relocated to Senyah. As a tribe, the Narma are distributed over a large territory with Gujrat in the east, Rawalpindi in the west, and Mirpur and Poonch in the north, with Panjan in Azad Kashmir being a centre of the tribe.

Clans

The Narmas in Gujrat say that they have nine clans which are as follows:

1. Sadrya

2. Adryal

3. Sambrhyal

4. Haudali

5. Jalali

6. Alimyana

7. Joyal

8. Umrali

9. Hassanabdalia.

Narma Rajputs in Indian administered Kashmir

In India administered Kashmir, they are found mainly in villages near Naushehra in Rajauri District. There main villages include Jamola and Gurdal Paine.

Narma Rajput in Azad Kashmir

Important Narma villages in Azad Kashmir include Khoi Ratta, Narma, Panjan, Dhargutti, Palal Rajgan, Panjpir, Prayi, Charohi, Rasani, Sabazkot, Sanghal, Senyah, and Tain all in Kotli District.

In Bagh District, their villages include Sirawera, Dhoomkot. Kaffulgarh, Ghaniabad, Bees Bagla, Sarmundle, Mandri, Bhutti, Nikkikair, Awera, Dhundar, Cheran, Makhdomkot, Chattar, Adyala Paddar, Lober, and Patrata.

While in Bhimber District, they are found in the villages of Haripur (Samani Tehsil), Jhangar (Bhimber Tehsil), Makri Bohani (Bhimber Tehsil), Broh (Bhimber Tehsil), Khamba (Bhimber Tehsil), Thandar (Bhimber Tehsil), Siyala (Bhimber Tehsil), Garhone (Bhimber Tehsil), and Chadhroon (Bhimber Tehsil).

Narma Rajput in Punjab

In Punjab, they are found in the districts of Gujrat, Jhelum and Rawalpindi. The villages of Puran and Fatehpur in Jhelum District are said to be their earliest settlements. In Rawalpindi, they are found in Jocha Mamdot ,Sood Badhana and Narmatokh Kangar villages.

Sohlan

Sohlan is said to have emigrated from Malwa in the middle ages, settling in the foothills of the Pir Panjal mountains, and converting to Islam. The Sohlan established a principality based on the town of the Khari Sharif and during the time of the Delhi Sultanate and the Mughals the reigning authorities never levied taxes in the Solhan ruled areas, in lieu of peaceful passage to Kabul. There are however other traditions which connect the Sohlan clan with the royal family from Kishtawar; with Raja Sohlan Singh quarrelling with his relations and settling in Khari, and expelling the Gujjar population. Legend also has it that Mangla Devi an ancestor of the tribe and after whom Mangla is named after was the first person from the tribe to convert to Islam. This site has now been inundated by the construction of the Mangla Dam in Mirpur District. After the collapse of the Mughal Empire, the Sohlan areas came under the rule of the Sikhs. This rule lasted until 1846 when Sohlan inhabited areas north of the Jhelum river were handed over to the Gulab Singh Dogra in an agreement with the British as part of the Treaty of Amritsar. As result of this treaty, Sohlan territory was effectively partitioned, with Sohlan south of the Jhelum coming under direct British areas, in what became the district of Jhelum and sub-district of Gujar Khan. Despite this separation, both the Chibhal territory of Jammu State and British Pothohar continued to share common cultural traditions, with minor dialectial differences between Pothwari and Pahari languages.

 

Presently, the Sohlan are found chiefly in the Mirpur District of Azad Kashmir, with small numbers found in Jhelum, Gujar Khan, and Rawalpindi.

Starting with Mirpur District, their villages include Bani (Mirpur), Dalyala, Ghaseetpur Sohalian, Koonjarai Nawab, Mehmunpur, and Sahang. Sohlan villages in Mirpur are located mainly around the town of Khari Sharif which has historically been ruled by this clan. Since the development of the Mangla Dam, old Jabot Village, which was also an important Sohlan village was submerged underwater causing many families to move to Khari Sharif, and establishing the village of New Jabot. The Sohlan village in Jhelum District are located north of the city of Jhelum near the border with Mirpur, the principal settlement being Sohan. Other villages include Gatyali or Patan Gatalyan, Chak Khasa, Pakhwal Rajgan, Chitti Rajgan, Pind Ratwal Tahlianwala, Dhok Sohlnan, Piraghaib and Langerpur. They are closely connected to with both the Bhao and Chibs, who are their neighbours, and with whom they share good many customs and traditions. Outside this core area, Sohlan villages include Sahang and Dhok Sohlan in Tehsil Gujar Khan district, Morah Sohlan, Pehount in the Islamabad Capital Territory and Naar Mandho in Kotli District.

Population of Muslim Rajput Clans of British Punjab According to the 1891 Census of India

In 1891 the total Rajput population was 1,983,299 of which Muslims were 1,559,977. I would also ask the reader to look at my other posts such as Muslim Rajput clans of British Punjab according to the 1901 Census of India.

 

Tribe

Population Distribution
Bhatti 297,343 throughout Punjab, but special concentrations in Bhatiana (Firuzpur/Hissar/Sirsa), Bhatiore (Jhang/Chiniot), Gujranwala and Rawalpindi
Khokhar 137,883 Jhang, Jhelum, Hoshiarpur, Sialkot, Hoshiarpur, Jallandhar and Gurdaspur
Chauhan 132,116 Modern Haryana (especially Karnal and Panipat), Ambala, and central Punjab – the Karnal, Rohtak and Rewari Chauhan are a Ranghar tribe, in central found mainly in Lahore, Amritsar and Jallandhar
Sial 106,146 Jhang, Multan and other parts of South Punjab
Gondal 62,071 Rawalpindi, Jhelum and Shahpur
Panwar 54,892 Rohtak, Karnal, Jind and Hissar (the eastern group); Bahawalpur, Multan and Muzaffargarh (the western group) – the eastern group are a Ranghar tribe; a smaller grouo also found in Jhelum
Kharal 51,586 Faisalabad and Sahiwal
Joiya 47,773 Along the banks of the Sutlej from Multan to Firuzpur extending to Hissar and Sirsa
Janjua 36,970 a western group in Rawalpindi and Jhelum and eastern group in Hoshiarpur
Ghorewaha 34,192 Present East Punjab, Jallandhar, Hoshiarpur and Ludhiana
Manj 26,983 Present East Punjab, Amritsar, Jallandhar, Hoshiarpur and Ludhiana
Wattu 24,150 Along the banks of the Sutlej from Bahawalpur to Firuzpur extending to Hissar and Sirsa
Sulehri / Sulehria 24,345 Sialkot and Gurdaspur
Naru 22,680 Present East Punjab, Amritsar, Jallandhar, Hoshiarpur and Ludhiana – by early 20th Century, several Naru were settled in Faisalabad and Sahiwal in the canal colonies
Tomar / Tonwar 21,691 Modern Haryana (especially Rohtak and Panipat), Ambala, and in the Bahawalpur Stater
Bariah also pronounced as Varya 19,463 Present East Punjab, Jallandhar, Hoshiarpur and Ludhiana
Ranjha 18,490 Jhelum / Chakwal
Taoni 17,730 Ambala – a Ranghar grouping
Manhas / Minhas 16,026 From Rawalpindi to Hoshiarpur – a Muslim Dogra grouping
Dhudhi 11,286 Sargodha, Jhang, Faisalabad and Sahiwal
Bhakral 11,207 Rawalpindi and Jhelum
Jatu 10,837 Modern Haryana (especially Hissar and Gurgaon), Ambala, and Rohtak. They are a Ranghar tribe
Satti 10,799 Rawalpindi
Dhanyal 8,524 Rawalpindi – Murree Tehsil
Khichi 7,845 Sargodha, Jhang and Sahiwal
Mekan 7,733 Sargodha (Shahpur District), Jhang and Rawalpindi
Chib 6,673 Gujrat, a Muslim Dogra clan
Mandahar 4,022 Modern Haryana (especially Karnal and Panipat), Ambala, and Hissar. They are a Ranghar tribe
Khanzada 3,471 Gurgaon – a branch of the Jadaun clan
Tiwana 3,120 a western group in Kushab and eastern group in Patiala
Raghubansi / Raghuvanshi 3,060 Ambala – a Ranghar clan
Kanial 2,725 Rawalpindi and Jhelum
Katil 2,461 Sialkot and Gurdaspur
Pundir 2,117 Ambala and Karnal – a Ranghar group with villages near the Yamuna river
Bargujar 2,046 Gurgaon – a Ranghar tribe found in Rewari
Kethwal 1,849 Rawalpindi – Murree Tehsil
Jadaun 1,353 Gurgaon and Karnal – a Ranghar tribe
Bagri 1,186 Hissar and Firuzpur, in areas bordering Bikaner. Rajasthani immigrants
Rathore 1,067 Hissar, Firuzpur and Bahawalpur, in areas bordering Bikaner. Rajasthani immigrants
Chandel 912 Present East Punjab, Jallandhar, Patiala and Ludhiana
Khoja 841 Multan and Bahawalpur State
Jaswal 558 Hoshiarpur
Gaurwa 546 Gurgaon – Ranghar group
Atiras 477 Patiala State
Pathial 470 Kangra and Hoshiarpur
Luddu 258 Hoshiarpur
Guleria 248 Hoshiarpur
Dhanwal 214 Sahiwal and Okara
Dadwal 147 Hoshiarpur
Pathania 138 Gurdaspur – a Muslim Dogra group
Katoch 101 Hoshiarpur
Miscellaneous clans 299,166 throughout Punjab

 

Population of Muslim Jat Clans of British Punjab According to the 1901 Census of India

Bellow is a breakdown of the larger Jat clans by population. I would also the reader to look at my posts Population of Muslim Jat Clans of British Punjab According to the 1891 Census of India/ and Major Muslim Jat clans, which gives a brief description of the main clans.

 

Tribe Population Distribution
Wariach 58,936 Gurdaspur, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Jhelum, Sialkot, Lahore and Amritsar
Cheema 39,358 Patiala, Lahore, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Gujranwala, Sialkot, Gujrat and Chenab Colony
Bajwa 27,609 Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Jallandhar and Patiala State
Chandhar/ Chadhar 27,422 Montgomery, Amritsar, Firuzpur, Lahore, Jhang, Muzaffargarh, Mianwali, Multan, Jhelum, Shahpur and Chenab Colony
Sandhu 25,786 Hissar, Ludhiana, Patiala, Montgomery, Gurdaspur, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Amritsar, Shahpur (Sargodha), Chenab Colony, Jhang and Multan
Tarar 25,606 Lahore, Gujrat, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Sargodha, Jhelum and Chenab Colony
Gill 19,894 Amritsar, Ludhiana, Jalandhar, Firuzpur, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Sialkot, and Chenab Colony
Virk 19,703 Gujranwala, Chenab Colony, Gujrat, Dera Ghazi Khan, Sialkot, Lahore and Amritsar
Ghumman 16,893 Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Sialkot, and Chenab Colony
Hanjra 15,892 Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Montgomery, Shahpur, Gujrat, Sialkot, and Chenab Colony
Bains 14,398 Ambala, Hoshiarpur, Gurdaspur, Sialkot, Gujrat, Jhelum, Rawalpindi, Shahpur, Chenab Colony, Multan and Dera Ghazi Khan
Bhutta 14,208 Shahpur, Jhelum, Mianwali, Multan and Chenab Colony
Goraya 14,076 Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Sialkot, and Chenab Colony
Bhatti 13,682 Shahpur, Jhelum, Mianwali and Chenab Colony
Langrial 12,960 Sialkot, Gujrat and Multan
Dhillon 12.913 Ambala, Hissar, Jalandhar, Kapurthala, Ludhiana, Amritsar, Lahore, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Sialkot Mianwali, and Chenab Colony
Sipra 12,558 Patiala, Montgomery, Gurdaspur, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Shahpur (Sargodha), Chenab Colony, Jhang, Multan and Bahawalpur
Heer 11,839 Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Montgomery, Shahpur, Mianwali, Gujrat, Sialkot, and Chenab Colony
Soomra / Samra 11,509 Mianwali, Muzaffargarh, Dera Ghazi Khan, Bahawalpur
Chatha 11,483 Patiala, Lahore, Gurdaspur, Gujranwala, Sialkot, Gujrat and Chenab Colony
Sahi 11,478 Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Patiala, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Gujrat, Jhelum and Sialkot
Sidhu 11,322 Hissar, Jallandhar, Ludhiana, Patiala, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Sialkot, Lahore, Gujranwala, Gujrat and Chenab Colony
Parhar 11,099 Shahpur, Bahawalpur, Muzaffargarh and Dera Ghazi Khan
Thaheem 11,023 Multan, Bahawalpur, Muzaffargarh and Dera Ghazi Khan
Kahlon 10,809 Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Kapurthala, Jalandhar and Chenab Colony
Langah 10,808 Shahpur, Muzaffargarh, Dera Ghazi Khan, Mianwali, Multan and Bahawalpur
Harral 10,599 Gujranwala, Shahpur, Mianwali, Gujrat, Jhang, and Chenab Colony
Chachar 10,079 Bahawalpur and Dera Ghazi Khan
Randhawa 9,617 Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Patiala, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Gujranwala and Sialkot
Chhina 8,492 Lahore, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Gujranwala, Sialkot, Gujrat, Rawalpindi, Mianwali, Chenab Colony and Dera Ghazi Khan
Panwar or Puar 7,900 Bahawalpur and Firuzpur
Chelar 7,529 Bahawalpur
Babbar 6,657 Multan, Dera Ghazi Khan and Muzaffargarh
Kang 6,580 Patiala, Lahore, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Gujranwala, Sialkot, Gujrat, Multan, Muzaffargarh and Chenab Colony
Sandhel 6,215 Dera Ghazi Khan, Mianwali, Muzaffargarh, Bahawalpur
Maan 5,939 Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Patiala, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Gujranwala, Sialkot and Chenab Colony
Aulakh 5,838 Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Amritsar, and Jallandhar
Sarai 5,746 Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Amritsar, Ludhiana, Ambala and Jallandhar
Janjua 5,394 Mianwali, Muzaffargarh and Dera Ghazi Khan
Jodhra 5,157 Attock
Mangat 5000 Patiala, Ludhiana, Gujrat, Gujranwala and Sialkot
Autrah 4,962 Multan, Mianwali and Muzaffargarh
Ghallu 4.906 Multan, Muzaffargarh and Bahawalpur
Buttar 4,923 Dera Ghazi Khan, Ludhiana, Firuzpur, Lahore, Gurdaspur, Gujranwala and Sialkot
Dhariwal 4,884 Ambala, Hissar, Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Amritsar, Lahore, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Sialkot and Chenab Colony
Chahal 4,466 Ambala, Ludhiana, Firuzpur, Amritsar, Lahore, Gurdaspur, Gujranwala, Sialkot and Chenab Colony
Sahu 4,294 Multan and Muzaffargarh
Dosanjh 4,198 Kapurthala and Jalandhar
Sial 4,169 Rawalpindi and Mianwali
Jakhar 4,165 Hissar, Firuzpur, Bahawalpur, Mianwali, Montgomery, and Multan
Lak 3,971 Shahpur, Jhang, Chenab Colony, Muzaffargarh and Dera Ghazi Khan
Bhullar 3,905 Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Jalandhar and Lahore
Naij 3,894 Bahawalpur
Bohar 3,833 Bahawalpur and Dera Ghazi Khan
Khaki 3,801 Multan, Muzaffargarh and Bahawalpur
Khokhar 3,735 Gujranwala
Malana 3,609 Muzaffargarh and Dera Ghazi Khan
Dahya 3,602 Ambala, Bahawalpur, Hissar, Karnal, Rohtak and Delhi
Mohana 3,591 Dera Ghazi Khan
Deo / Dev 3,549 Ludhiana, Patiala, Amritsar, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Mianwali and Chenab Colony
Lodike 3,269 Gujranwala
Malak 3,264 Bahawalpur
Atwal 3,200 Jalandhar and Amritsar
Lali 3,137 Shahpur and Jhang
Samma 3,084 Bahawalpur
Kharal 3,046 Gujranwala
Kalru 2,956 Multan and Muzaffargarh
Kanyal 2,944 Rawalpindi and Jhelum
Khera or Khaira 2,942 Lahore, Amritsar and Sialkot
Sahotra 2,805 Hoshiarpur, Jalandhar and Chenab Colony
Maitla 2,765 Dera Ghazi Khan and Multan
Phor 2,738 Multan and Dera Ghazi Khan
Lakaul 2,675 Muzaffargarh and Dera Ghazi Khan
Dhotar 2,545 Gujranwala and Gujrat
Gondal 2,508 Jhelum, Rawalpindi and Chenab Colony
Bassi 2,449 Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Sohal 2,383 Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Patiala, Amritsar, Gurdaspur and Sialkot
Sangi 2,338 Dera Ghazi Khan, Bahawalpur, Firuzpur and Kapurthala
Naul 2,311 Jhang
Aura 2,329 Rawalpindi
Kalasra 2,284 Mianwali and Muzaffargarh
Bahiniwal / Wahiniwal 2,227 Montgomery, Hissar, Rohtak and Firuzpur
Daha 2,222 Muzaffargarh, Multan and Bahawalpur
Dhamial 2,209 Rawalpindi and Jhelum
Johal 2,199 Amritsar, Kapurthala, Jalandhar and Chenab Colony
Nonari 2,086 Multan, Muzaffargarh, Montgomery and Bahawalpur
Channar 1,959 Multan and Bahawalpur
Lang 1,873 Multan
Mahil 1,861 Ambala, Hoshiarpur and Amritsar
Nanwai 1,833 Bahawalpur
Uttera 1,817 Multan and Bahawalpur
Kalial 1,791 Rawalpindi
Sudhan 1,765 Rawalpindi
Pannun 1,752 Amritsar, Lahore, Gujranwala, Sialkot and Chenab Colony
Chhajra 1,648 Dera Ghazi Khan
Barra 1,597 Dera Ghazi Khan
Bhachar 1,588 Mianwali
Jakhlan 1,584 Dera Ghazi Khan
Kalwar 1,582 Bahawalpur
Khatreel 1,578 Rawalpindi
Rehan 1,573 Jhang and Shahpur
Hans 1,542 Multan, Muzaffargarh and Montgomery
Waseer 1,513 Chenab Colony
Jhammat 1,508 Mianwali and Jhelum
Turk 1,499 Mianwali
Kohawer 1,487 Mianwali
Kahka 1,453 Bahawalpur
Gandhi 1,452 Mianwali
Bal 1,439 Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Lahore, Jalandhar and Ludhiana
Marral or Marhal 1,434 Karnal, Patiala and Jhang
Sahmal 1,417 Jhang and Chenab Colony
Tulla 1,403 Sargodha
Asar 1,400 Mianwali
Sanda 1,398 Bahawalpur and Mianwali
Gilotar 1,394 Jhang
Dumra 1,357 Mianwali and Dera Ghazi Khan
Turkhel 1,344 Mianwali
Sekhon 1,335 Gujranwala
Kahu 1,331 Chenab Colony
Dahar / Dahiri 1,327 Bahawalpur
Kalu 1,301 Mianwali
Kalu 1,301 Mianwali
Jhullan 1,285 Bahawalpur
Lohanch 1,275 Mianwali and Muzaffargarh
Wagha 1,273 Chenab Colony
Rawn 1,213 Multan
Bhidwal 1,207 Mianwali
Hanbi 1,207 Dera Ghazi Khan
Bhangu 1,186 Amritsar, Gurdaspur and Chenab Colony
Khandoa 1,168 Mianwali
Chaudhari 1,162 Bahawalpur
Ser 1,144 Mianwali
Uttra 1,145 Mianwali
Kalyar 1,123 Multan
Rawn 1,212 Multan
Talokar 1,096 Mianwali
Jhawari 1,092 Shahpur
Mahe 1,050 Multan
Ganja 1,047 Bahawalpur
Tonwar / Tomar 1,038 Bahawalpur
Dhindsa 1,032 Jalandhar, Kapurthala, Ludhiana, Amritsar, Lahore, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Sialkot, and Chenab Colony
Kachela 1,010 Multan
Samtia 1,007 Mianwali
Joiya 993 Bahawalpur, Firuzpur and Mianwali
Duran 977 Bahawalpur
Panjootha 966 Shahpur
Grewal 965 Ludhiana
Dhudhi 965 Mianwali
Dhandla 929 Dera Ghazi Khan
Bhaya 923 Bahawalpur
Kajla 922 Dera Ghazi Khan
Hidan 915 Jhang
Dab 908 Jhang
Bar 899 Chenab Colony
Minhas 824 Jhelum
Dakah 823 Bahawalpur
Gorchhar 807 Mianwali
Shajra 796 Multan and Bahawlpur
Bhumla 793 Mianwali
Lar 778 Multan and Muzaffargarh
Mahaar 773 Dera Ghazi Khan and Bahawalpur
Kanera 765 Dera Ghazi Khan
Wahla 756 Chenab Colony
Kalhora 725 Bahawalpur
Panuhan 723 Multan
Jora 718 Shahpur
Jappa 706 Jhang
Jatal 703 Rawalpindi
Kolar 661 Bahawalpur
Burana 657 Shahpur
Khichi 651 Bahawalpur
Mahesar 648 Dera Ghazi Khan and Bahawalpur
Baghial 647 Rawalpindi
Dhandhu 643 Bahawalpur
Khombra 637 Bahawalpur
Dhamtal 635 Rawalpindi
Manela 628 Bahawalpur
Kanju 626 Multan
Raad 618 Multan
Khatti 612 Dera Ghazi Khan
Butta 610 Chenab Colony
Rajoke 607 Chenab Colony
Mial or Miyal 599 Rawalpindi
Maghial 596 Rawalpindi
Bhakral 585 Jhelum
Pawania 581 Karnal, Hissar and Firuzpur
Lodhra 580 Multan
Pawania 576 Hissar, Karnal and Rohtak
Bedha 572 Mianwali
Masson 563 Bahawalpur
Nissowana 560 Shahpur and Jhang
Ghatwala or Malik 556 Hissar, Karnal, Rohtak and Delhi
Marath 549 Shahpur
Sanghera 544 Jalandhar and Kapurthala
Basra 540 Gurdaspur and Sialkot
Thathaal 534 Rawalpindi, Jhelum and Sialkot
Murali 526 Jhang
Khal 512 Bahawalpur
Bipar 508 Bahawalpur
Dharal 499 Mianwali
Burara 498 Bahawalpur
Kohadar 496 Bahawalpur
Badhan 494 Rawalpindi, Jhelum and Sialkot
Magrial 486 Rawalpindi
Chan 479 Muzaffargarh
Bhutt 475 Bahawalpur
Makwal 473 Dera Ghazi Khan and Bahawalpur
Sutera 468 Bahawalpur
Sehwag 462 Karnal and Rohtak
Dasa 459 Bahawalpur
Nain 456 Karnal, Rohtak and Delhi
Jaam 448 Bahawalpur
Sagoo 445 Shahpur (Sargodha)
Rak 435 Multan
Khalne 412 Bahawalpur
Wattu 411 Chenab Colony
Sandi 410 Mianwali
Jhar 402 Dera Ghazi Khan
Deshwal / Deswal 400 Hissar, Gurgaon, Karnal, Rohtak and Delhi
Khar 389 Muzaffargarh
Jaj 382 Chenab Colony
Noon 377 Multan
Dhal 374 Shahpur
Mohal 373 Montgomery and Bahawalpur
Budhwana 366 Mianwali
Rathi 363 Karnal, Rohtak and Delhi
Chauhan 361 Lahore and Amritsar
Gahora 352 Bahawalpur
Gaun 349 Multan
Manais 332 Montgomery
Sahgra 331 Multan
Unnar 329 Bahawalpur
Toor 329 Patiala State
Gangal 325 Rawalpindi
Kathia 320 Montgomery
Matyal 314 Rawalpindi
Athangal 308 Multan
Sarah 300 Firuzpur,
Dona 290 Multan
Kont 288 Bahawalpur
Siroha 281 Rohtak
Mahota 277 Multan
Bucha 275 Multan
Bhagiara 270 Rawalpindi
Gawanis 262 Chenab Colony
Wawana 258 Mianwali
Kalasan 252 Jhang
Jhak 246 Bahawalpur
Hurgan 236 Shahpur
Chauhan-Hamshira 233 Bahawalpur
Tama 231 Jhelum
Hundal 230 Amritsar and Chenab Colony
Mangral 226 Rawalpindi
Hattial 222 Rawalpindi
Suddle 221 Multan
Khehi 219 Bahawalpur
Kudhan 216 Jhang
Kassar 216 Jhelum
Rawana 215 Mianwali
Salhal 215 Rawalpindi
Mangon 204 Jhang
Kasra 204 Jhang
Bhindar 194 Gujranwala
Harrial 194 Rawalpindi
Nehon 184 Bahawalpur
Atar Khel 181 Mianwali
Waghora 173 Mianwali
Godara 170 Karnal, Rohtak and Delhi
Phira 170 Rawalpindi
Pala Khel 169 Mianwali
Balani 167 Chenab Colony
Pandah 165 Multan
Des 158 Mianwali
Markhand 155 Bahawalpur
Hannial 155 Rawalpindi
Mundra 150 Rawalpindi
Targar 150 Jhang
Matmal 149 Jhang
Dagur 148 Gurgaon, Rohtak and Delhi
Kalu Khel 147 Mianwali
Lidhar 141 Amritsar and Chenab Colony
Gallat 138 Rohtak
Phal 135 Rawalpindi
Walana 132 Rawalpindi
Sian 131 Chenab Colony
Birkan 130 Mianwali
Chal 123 Multan
Sangah 123 Bahawalpur
Tatla 117 Chenab Colony
Sahrawat 108 Karnal, Rohtak and Gurgaon
Hasnana 104 Jhang
Khalis 102 Rawalpindi
Narwal 101 Karnal
Dalal 97 Hissar, Gurgaon, Rohtak and Delhi
Bandecha 90 Lahore
Chandhran 76 Multan
Kookara 55 Jhang
Ahlawat 48 Rohtak
Baidwan 47 Ambala
Rohal 44 Karnal and Rohtak
Dhankar 42 Delhi and Rohtak
Sheoran 37 Hissar and Karnal
Salakhlan 25 Rohtak
Gulia 17 Rohtak and Delhi
Sethi 14 Ludhiana
Boparai 13 Ludhiana
Aujla Malerkotla 11
Kadian 11 Karnal

 

Population of Muslim Rajput Clans of British Punjab According to the 1911 Census of India

Below is a breakdown of the larger Rajput clans by population according to the 1911 Census of Punjab. Prior to 1947, Punjab consisted of the following territories:

Punjab (British India): British Territory and Princely States
Division Districts in British Territory / Princely States
Delhi Division
Jullundur Division
Lahore Division
Rawalpindi Division
Multan Division
Total area, British Territory 97,209 square miles
Native States
Total area, Native States 36,532 square miles
Total area, Punjab 133,741 square miles

Source Wikipedia

Punjab 1909.jpg

Map of British Punjab: Source Wikipedia

I would also ask the reader to look at my post on the Muslim Population of Muslim Jat Clans of British Punjab According to the 1911 Census of India, which shows the overlap of clans between the Muslim Jats and Muslim Rajputs of Punjab.

Tribe Population Distribution
Bhatti 319,860 Hisar, Karnal, Patiala, Nabha, Ambala, Kalsia,  Hoshiarpur, Jullundur, Kapurthala, Ludhiana, Firozpur, Faridkot, Lahore, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Shahpur, Jhelum, Rawalpindi, Attock, Mianwali, Montgomery, Lyallpur, Jhang, Multan, Muzaffargarh, Dera Ghazi Khan and Bahawalpur
Chauhan 109,533 Hisar, Rohtak, Gurgaon, Karnal, Patiala, Nabha, Ambala, Kalsia,  Hoshiarpur, Jullundur, Kapurthala, Ludhiana, Firozpur, Faridkot, Lahore, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Shahpur, Jhelum, Rawalpindi, Attock, Mianwali, Montgomery, Lyallpur, Jhang, Multan, Muzaffargarh, Dera Ghazi Khan and Bahawalpur
Khokhar 93,012 Hisar, Patiala, Nabha,   Hoshiarpur, Jullundur, Kapurthala, Ludhiana, Firozpur, Faridkot, Lahore, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Shahpur, Jhelum, Mianwali, Montgomery, Lyallpur, Jhang, Multan, Muzaffargarh, Dera Ghazi Khan and Bahawalpur
Sial 91,211 Hisar, Karnal, Hoshiarpur, Ludhiana, Firozpur, Faridkot, Amritsar, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Shahpur, Jhelum, Rawalpindi, Mianwali, Montgomery, Lyallpur, Jhang, Multan, Muzaffargarh, Dera Ghazi Khan and Bahawalpur
Joiya 49,486 Hisar, Ludhiana, Firozpur, Faridkot, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Shahpur, Mianwali, Montgomery, Lyallpur, Jhang, Multan, Muzaffargarh, Dera Ghazi Khan and Bahawalpur
Panwar 47,318 Hisar, Rohtak, Gurgaon, Karnal, Jind, Ambala, Jalandhar, Lahore, Sialkot, Shahpur, Jhelum,  Montgomery, Multan, Muzaffargarh and Bahawalpur
Wattu 34,696 Hisar, Firozpur, Faridkot, Lahore, Montgomery, Lyallpur and Bahawalpur
Naru 29,665 Hoshiarpur, Jalandhar, Kapurthala, Ludhiana, Firozpur, Amritsar, Lahore, Montgomery and Lyallpur
Bariah also pronounced as Varya 29,566 Karnal, Mandi, Patiala Ambala, Hoshiarpur, Jalandhar, and Ludhiana,
Tomar 26,363 Hisar, Gurgaon, Delhi, Karnal, Jind, Ambala, Kalsia, Patiala, Nabha, Jalandhar, Kapurthala, Firozpur, Montgomery, Multan and Bahawalpur
Ghorewaha 26,203 Hisar, Ambala, Patiala, Hoshiarpur, Jalandhar, Kapurthala, Ludhiana, Firozpur and Amritsar
Mandahar 25,724 Karnal, Jind, Patiala, Ambala, and Ludhiana,
Janjua 25,621 Ambala, Patiala, Hoshiarpur, Firozpur, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Shahpur, Jhelum, Rawalpindi, Attock and Mianwali
Taoni 25,116 Hisar, Rohtak, Hoshiarpur, Ludhiana, Faridkot and Patiala
Sulehri / Sulehria 25,512 Hoshiarpur, Ludhiana, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujrat and Jhelum
Manj 20,633 Hoshiarpur, Jalandhar, Kapurthala, Ludhiana, Malerkotla, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Firozpur, and Lahore
Kharal 16,010 Hisar, Jalandhar, Firozpur, Faridkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Shahpur, Jhang, Muzaffargarh, Lyallpur, Jhang, Dera Ghazi Khan and Bahawalpur
Mair-Minhas 15,094 Jhelum, Rawalpindi, and Attock
Jatu 14,442 Hisar, Rohtak, Delhi, Karnal, Loharu, Dujana, Pataudi and Firozpur
Chib 10,805 Gujrat, Jhelum, Shahpur, Rawalpindi and Attock
Manhas / Minhas 10,382 Hoshiarpur, Jalandhar, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Gujranwala, Sialkot, Gujrat, Jhelum, Rawalpindi and Attock
Awan 9.555 Delhi, Faridkot, Firuzpur, Gurdaspur, Lahore, Sialkot and Gujrat
Alpial 9,303 Jhelum, Rawalpindi and Attock
Dondal 8,843 Jhelum, Rawalpindi and Attock
Jodhra 8,821 Jhelum and Attock
Dhamial / Tamial 8,569 Gujrat, Jhelum, Rawalpindi and Attock
Dhanyal 7,909 Rawalpindi
Baghial 6,715 Rawalpindi
Dhudhi 6,730 Shahpur, Jhang, Lyallpur and Montgomery
Bhakral 6,626 Rawalpindi,  Jhelum and Attock
Kalial 5,084 Shahpur, Jhelum, Rawalpindi and Attock
Khichi 4,963 Hisar, Firozpur, Sialkot, Gujranwala, Shahpur, Jhelum, Jhang, Lyallpur, Montgomery, and Bahawalpur
Langrial 4,959 Jhelum, Shahpur, Montgomery and Multan
Raghubansi 4,590 Hisar, Karnal, Gurgaon, Jind, Ambala, Kalsia, Patiala and Ludhiana
Qaimkhani 4,225 Hisar, Rohtak, Gurgaon, Dujana and Jind
Chadhar 3,825 Shahpur, Jhelum, Mianwali, Montgomery, Lyallpur and Jhang
Khanzada 3,662 Gurgaon
Katwal 3,648 Lahore, Amritsar, Gurdaspur, Gujranwala and Shahpur
Dahya 3,620 Ambala and Hoshiarpur
Jhammat 3,483 Sialkot, Gujrat, Shahpur and Jhelum
Sudhan 3,345 Rawalpindi, Attock and Lyallpur
Sapal 2,950 Jalandhar, Ludhiana and Nabha
Kathia 2,900 Montgomery
Katil 2,726 Gurdaspur, Sialkot and Gujrat
Kanial 2,720 Gujrat, Shahpur, Jhelum, Rawalpindi and Attock
Jatal 2,498 Gujranwala, Jhelum and Rawalpindi
Mangral 2,424 Gujrat, Jhelum, Rawalpindi and Attock
Mayen 2,288 Patiala, Ludhiana, Multan and Bahawalpur
Tiwana 2,285 Shahpur and Lyallpur
Nagrial 2,220 Rawalpindi
Kalyar 2,177 Shahpur
Gaharwal 2,069 Rawalpindi
Nagyal 2,165 Gujrat,  Jhelum and Rawalpindi 
Rawat 1,971 Malerkotla
Baghial 1,965 Rawalpindi
Bhatia 1,913 Hisar, Lyallpur, Multan and Bahawalpur
Jaswal 1,890 Delhi, Kangra, Hoshiarpur, Jalandhar, Ludhiana, Gurdaspur and Sialkot
Gakhar 1,812 Gujranwala,Sialkot, Jhelum, Rawalpindi amd Attock
Grewal 1,778 Kangra, Ambala, Firozpur and Patiala
Gaurwa 1,740 Delhi and Gurgaon
Mekan 1,709 Shahpur, Jhang and Muzaffargarh
Thathaal 1,676 Jhelum and Rawalpindi
Bargujar 1,640 Hisar, Rohtak, Gurgaon and Dujana
Jhap 1,559 Jhang
Mahaar 1,527 Hisar, Patiala, Firozpur, Lahore, Montgomery and Bahawalpur
Rathore 1,516 Hisar, Rohtak, Karnal, Jind, Firozpur and Bahawalpur
Dogar 1,511 Hisar, Firozpur and Montgomery
Jamra 1,455 Dera Ghazi Khan
Talor 1,378 Hisar, Rohtak and Firozpur
Totar 1,372 Rohtak
Matyal 1,347 Rawalpindi
Bangyal 1,302 Gujrat and Rawalpindi
Khuhi 1,148 Multan
Warha 1,288 Hisar, Firozpur and Bahawalpur State
Waseer 1,257 Firozpur, Gujranwala, Lyallpur and Montgomery
Jalap 1,172 Jhelum
Nagrawal 1,143 Rawalpindi
Ramial 1,120 Rawalpindi
Todal 1,056 Firozpur
Ghangar 1,002 Rawalpindi
Jarala 992 Hoshiarpur and Gurdaspur
Daha 991 Multan and Montgomery
Badpyar 988 Delhi
Pundir 985 Ambala and Karnal
Targar 973 Jhang, Muzaffargarh and Multan
Atiras 965 Patiala State
Kural 961 Rawalpindi
Hon 958 Rawalpindi and Attock
Budhal 956 Gujranwala, Gujrat, Rawalpindi and Attock
Phularwan 935 Montgomery
Baghela 926 Montgomery
Kalu 918 Shahpur
Taru 901 Hisar, Karnak and Ambala
Mughal 897 Sialkot, Gujranwala, Gujrat, Jhelum and Rawalpindi
Noon 885 Shahpur, Jhang, Muzaffargarh and Multan
Barial 872 Gurdaspur, Hoshiarpur, Ludhiana and Kapurthala
Janjali 872 Gujtanwala
Lakhanpal 865 Firozpur, Gurdaspur, Sialkot and Lahore
Mukhmdal 852 Gujrat
Bhatti-Jat 851 Montgomery
Garial 849 Jhelum and Rawalpindi
Jndu 834 Patiala and Ludhiana
Jora 834 Hisar and Firozpur
Attar 823 Shahpur and Jhelum
Mial 817 Rawalpindi
Bains 812 Karnal, Sialkot, Gujrat, Jhelum, Rawalpindi, Muzaffargarh and Multan
Kalu Khokhar 809 Jalandhar
Hans 799 Hisar, Patiala, Firozpur, Gurdaspur, Montgomery, Gujrat and Shahapur
Chaughata 796 Hisar, Patiala, Firozpur, Faridkot, Montgomery and Multan
Adrah 792 Rawalpindi
Sangha Khokhar 776 Jalandhar
Gehlot (Sessodia) 775 Hisar, Gurgaon, Rohtak, Delhi and Karnal
Sangra 765 Hisar, Firozpur, Faridkot, Montgomery, Lahore and Lyallpur
Kala 747 Jhang
Sakhri 743 Hisar
Jabra 727 Gurdaspur and Sialkot
Satti 718 Rawalpindi
Halarie 716 Sialkot
Taraqar 710 Multan
Rath 708 Amritsar and Montgomery
Bhao 706 Gurdaspur and Sialkot
Bains 702 Jhelum, Rawalpindi and Attock
Sarral 698 Rawalpindi
Sahans 688 Ludhiana and Patiala
Pakhral 685 Rawalpindi
Mohal 682 Jalandhar, Firozpur and Sialkot
Luddu 680 Hoshiarpur
Jota 667 Firozpur, Montgomery, Jhang and Multan
Dhandi 667 Firozpur and Montgomery
Sohlan 648 Gujrat and Jhelum
Naipal 644 Ludhiana, Firozpur and Lahore
Kethwal 642 Rawalpindi
Doli 639 Montgomery
Naul 622 Lahore, Gujranwala and Sialkot
Chandel 696 Hisar, Karnal, Ambala, Jallandhar, Patiala and Ludhiana
Barai 589 Hisar
Chatha 582 Rawalpindi and Attock
Ranjha 579 Jhelum
Satraola 572 Hisar and Rohtak
Jaswan 579 Firozpur and Amritsar
Agan 569 Gurdaspur
Dhanwal 569 Montgomery
Jandran 551 Montgomery
Ratial 549 Rawalpindi
Matti 548 Ambala and Patiala
Tanwari 547 Shahpur
Langeh 528 Gurdaspur, Lahore, Sialkot, Gujrat, Jhelum and Rawalpindi
Kahut 527 Shahpur
Bhon 519 Shahpur, Jhelum and Attock
Jajja 514 Shahpur
Banj 503 Ambala and Jalandhar
Khagar 495 Patiala, Lyallpur and Montgomery
Bhatti Barial 484 Firozpur and Faridkot
Gondal 484 Hisar, Ambala, Firozpur, Gujranwala, and Shahpur
Mar 484 Hoshiarpur, Jalandhar, Ludhiana and Firozpur
Chachar 481 Gujrat
Narwan 481 Hisar and Karnal
Vahal 476 Montgomery
Rajoke 476 Jhang, Lyallpur and Montgomery
Tuhar 455 Hisar, Gurgaon and Ambala
Dhund 454 Jhelum, Rawalpindi and Attock
Dharsi 453 Rawalpindi
Luddu 450 Hoshiarpur and Jalandhar
Hari 447 Lyallpur, Jhang and Montgomery
Rehan 447 Shahpur, Jhang and Montgomery
Koth 446 Gurdaspur
Dhawan 439 Jhelum
Darnage 432 Jalandhar
Dawana 431 Multan
Jadaun 431 Hisar, Gurgaon and Karnal
Karhwal 422 Rawalpindi
Chatha 420 Rawalpindi
Naran 420 Hoshiarpur
Laker 413 Hisar and Firozpur
Kalian 408 Lahore
Saroi 407 Hisar, Gurgaon, Rohtak and Firozpur
Sandhu 406 Firozpur, Amritsar, Gurdaspur and Rawalpindi
Kaleke 399 Hisar, Firozpur, and Montgomery
Bomi 397 Hisar
Dhillon 391 Patiala, Firozpur and Lahore
Sahwal 388 Attock
Sajoka 384 Jhang
Kalas 376 Hoshiarpur,Gurdaspur and Sialkot
Gori 376 Hisar, Jalandhar, Ludhiana and Hoshiarpur
Kangra 360 Jalandhar
Dohya 357 Patiala
Jakhar 350 Lyallpur, Montgomery and Bahawalpur
Dogra 346 Gurdaspur, Sialkot and Rawalpindi
Dadwal 343 Hoshiarpur and Gurdaspur
Thethia 342 Shahpur
Bhara 341 Karnal
Marral 335 Multan
Walana 323 Sialkot, Gujrat and Jhelum
Mahal 321 Hoshiarpur
Kachhwaha 314 Hisar, Rohtak, Karnal and Firozpur
Giaru 311 Multan
Jonia 307 Firozpur and Lahore
Thakri 302 Kangra, Gurdaspur, Sialkot and Gujrat
Hargan 291 Gujranwala and Shahpur
Naoli 290 Firozpur
Chhina 289 Gujrat
Parihar 280 Hisar, Patiala, Firozpur, Montgomery and Shahpur
Valiar 279 Montgomery
Jhandu 279 Hisar and Firozpur
Ganjial 278 Shahpur and Rawalpindi
Hataria 276 Shahpur
Kanju 274 Hisar, Firozpur, Multan and Shahpur
Gaur 270 Karnal, Patiala and Jind
Goria 269 Delhi, Rohtak and Karnal
Mewati 265 Hisar and Karnal
Khilji 262 Hisar, Patiala and Jind
Behlim 262 Gujranwala and Jhang
Virk 258 Sialkot, Gujranwala and Jhelum
Karchhi 256 Gurdaspur
Thakkar 253 Gurdaspur and Sialkot
Khorial 249 Gujranwala
Jamral 248 Gujrat
Solgi 247 Lahore
Malana 244 Jhang and Multan
Bansi 242 Hisar
Chastani 239 Multan
Dhori 239 Gujranwala and Gujrat
Charak 232 Sialkot
Bhutta 232 Gujranwala and Shahpur
Lon 229 Karnal and Ludhiana
Maan 220 Ambala, Hoshiarpur, Jalandhar, Ludhiana and Gurdaspur
Adhari 219 Rawalpindi
Jaral 218 Kangra, Gurdaspur, Sialkot, Gujrat and Rawalpindi
Hanjra 218 Hisar and Firozpur
Barzah 212 Ambala
Daal 210 Hisar amd Rohtak
Ghanwan 210 Jalandhar
Ahir 206 Hisar
Mahial 205 Rawalpindi and Attock
Rupyal 204 Jhelum and Rawalpindi
Bohra 204 Hisar and Gurgaon
Dariyah 203 Hoshiarpur and Jalandhar
Surajbansi 202 Jalandhar and Lahore
Jasgam 200 Rawalpindi
Harchand 200 Hoshiarpur and Gurdaspur
Thaheem 200 Ludhiana, Firozpur, Lahore, Montgomery and Jhang
Daneri 193 Delhi
Mathras 192 Ambala, Ludhiana and Jalandhar
Dhadi 191 Amritsar and Lahore
Devta 191 Sialkot
Gohra 178 Sialkot, Gujrat and Jhelum
Marrar 176 Jalandhar, Gujrat and Shahpur
Sardia 176 Hisar
Jagarya 175 Rawalpindi
Khingar 174 Rawalpindi
Dhakar 174 Jhang
Mandal / Marhal 173 Rohtak and Karnal
Bakhar 173 Amritsar
Garhal 166 Rawalpindi
Mandial 165 Shahpur and Rawalpindi
Bhangu 163 Gurdaspur and Gujrat
Pandal 163 Lahore, Sialkot and Gujranwala
Khokhar Sial 162 Ambala and Hoshiarpur
Marial 162 Rawalpindi and Attock
Kakaria 162 Hisar and Firozpur
Nonari 161 Firozpur and Lahore
Puri 161 Lyallpur
Saronch 160 Sialkot
Daria Sial 159 Gujrat
Shalili 159 Shahpur
Lidhar 159 Jalanhar and Lahore
Sanwal 154 Karnal
Bhadauria 152 Hisar and Gurgaon
Nanare 150 Lahore
Warriach 149 Shahpur, Jhelum and Rawalpindi
Rattol 149 Karnal and Ambala
Pathania 146 Kangra, Gurdaspur and Sialkot
Gill 145 Firozpur and Amritsar
Chahal 141 Hisar and Patiala
Sarial 138 Rawalpindi and Attock
Bajju 137 Sialkot
Bargala 136 Delhi
Sewal 135 Rawalpindi
Hanjoiya 134 Hisar
Lodhra 134 Shahpur and Rawalpindi
Sakral 134 Ambala
Sabadhu 133 Rawalpindi
Bhon 133 Jhang
Arar 133 Firozpur
Sarodh 129 Patiala and Ludhiana
Jiwar 128 Lahore, Sialkot and Gujranwala
Godara 128 Hisar
Tatri 126 Shahpur and Jhang
Jaspal 126 Gujrat
Varbhu 126 Jhang
Hajua 125 Jhang
Sodana 125 Lahore
Makral 124 Rawalpindi
Kheri 126 Firozpur and Bahawalpur
Makwal 124 Muzaffargarh and Multan
Rachpal 121 Bahawalpur
Sabana 120 Jhang, Lyallpur and Montgomery
Sardha 120 Gurgaon
Amnbral 119 Gujrat
Mone 117 Jalandhar and Firozpur
Khatreel 117 Rawalpindi
Malamta 116 Karnal
Badhan 115 Rawalpindi
Satrawe 114 Karnal
Chandar 113 Ambala
Chanda 112 Hisar
Tangral 112 Rawalpindi
Deta 110 Jalandhar
Deora 109 Ambala and Hoshiarpur
Sagoo 109 Jalandhar and Firozpur
Bosan 108 Multan
Dhad 108 Firozpur
Manesar 108 Shahpur
Madhwal 108 Sialkot
Cheema 107 Jhelum
Tammar 103 Firozpur
Hastial 101 Rawalpindi
Sameja 101 Multan
Narbans 102 Gurgaon
Sambial 101 Gurgaon
Nagra 99 Lahore
Bhardwaj 97 Gurgaon and Lyallpur
Pathial 95 Sialkot
Indauria 87 Kangra
Guleria 85 Kangra
Marath 84 Jhelum
Doad 83 Hoshiarpur
Shaikhawat 82 Hisar